Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Cambyses


Related Topics

In the News (Tue 23 Jul 19)

  
  History of Iran: Cambyses (Kamboujyeh)
Cambyses successfully managed the crossing of the hostile Sinai Desert, traditionally Egypt's first and strongest line of defense, and brought the Egyptians under Psamtik III, son and successor of Ahmose, to battle at Pelusium.
In 522 BCE news reached Cambyses of a revolt in Iran led by an impostor claiming to be Bardiya, Cambyses' brother.
Cambyses has been rather mistreated in the sources, thanks partly to the prejudices of Herodotus' Egyptian informers and partly to the propaganda motives of Darius I. Cambyses is reported to have ruled the Egyptians harshly and to have desecrated the irreligious ceremonies and shrines.
www.iranchamber.com /history/cambyses/cambyses.php   (380 words)

  
  Cambyses - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cambyses (or Cambese) is the Greek version of the name of several monarchs of Achaemenid line of ancient Persia.
Cambyses II (Kambujiya II) was a son of Cyrus I, and ruled Anshan from 600 to 559 BCE.
Cambyses III (Kambujiya III) was son and successor of Cyrus II the Great and ruled Persia from 530 to 522 BCE.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cambyses   (290 words)

  
 Cambyses II of Persia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cambyses wants to marry a daughter of Amasis, who sends him a daughter of Apries instead of his own daughter, and by her Cambyses is induced to begin the war.
His great crime is the killing of the Apis bull, for which he is punished by madness, in which he commits many other crimes, kills his brother and his sister, and at last loses his empire and dies from a wound in the hip, at the same place where he had wounded the sacred animal.
According to Herodotus, Cambyses sent an army to threaten the Oracle of Amun at the Siwa Oasis.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cambyses_II   (1027 words)

  
 CAMBYSES - LoveToKnow Article on CAMBYSES
In the Persian tradition the crime of Cambyses is the murder of his brother; he is further accused of drunkenness, in which he commits many crimes, and thus accelerates his ruin.
It is impossible from these sources to form a correct picture of Cambyses character; but it seems certain that he was a wild despot and that he was led by drunkenness to many atrocious deeds.
Cambyses had prepared for the march through the desert by an alliance with Arabian chieftains, who brought a large supply of water to the stations.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /C/CA/CAMBYSES.htm   (748 words)

  
 Cambyses Essay   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
On specific points his claims that Cambyses are totally unfounded and are purely Egyptian propaganda, as are the stories of the destruction of Amasis's body and the Apis bull.
Cambyses also says that he has a biological link to Egypt as he says that his mother was Egyptian, again this is similar to Cyrus who although was a Persian claimed to be a Mede by blood as well.
In conclusion it is reasonable to say that Cambyses was very similar to his father in attitudes towards newly conquered empire and Herodotus would have agreed if he had had more reliable sources when he received the information.
www.herodotuswebsite.co.uk /essays/cambyses.htm   (762 words)

  
 Cambyses (part one)
Cambyses was the oldest son of Cyrus the Great, the first king of the Achaemenid empire (559-530).
It is possible that Cambyses was now made satrap of Bactria; in the next two generations, every crown prince served in that region.
Without the knowledge of the Samians, Polycrates sent an envoy to Cambyses the son of Cyrus (who was gathering an army to attack Egypt) and asked him to send a messenger to him in Samos to ask for an armed force.
www.livius.org /caa-can/cambyses_ii/cambyses_ii.html   (1851 words)

  
 Herodotus on Cambyses
Cambyses received in all kindness the gifts of the Libyans; but he seized what came from Cyrene and, displeased, I think, because it was so little--for the Cyrenaeans had sent five hundred silver minae--cast it with his own hands among his army.
The Greeks say that Cambyses had set a lion cub to fight a puppy, and that this woman was watching too; and that as the puppy was losing, its brother broke its leash and came to help, and the two dogs together got the better of the cub.
Cambyses perceiving it asked why she wept, and she said that when she saw the puppy help its brother she had wept, recalling Smerdis and knowing that there would be no avenger for him.
nefertiti.iwebland.com /herodotus/cambyses.htm   (3390 words)

  
 Iranica.com - HERODOTUS
Cambyses, the son of Cyrus, is first described by Herodotus at a time when his father's reign was already about to end.
Cambyses was blind enough to consider the religious ceremonies as a celebration of the failure of the Ethiopian campaign.
Cambyses' punishment of the corrupt judge Sisamnes, whom he skinned and with whose skin he covered the judge's bench, on which the latter's son was to take his place as judge (5.25), splendidly fits into a character image which sees Cambyses as a despo‚te@s (3.89.3).
www.iranica.com /articles/v12f3/v12f3016e.html   (2494 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | The History of Herodotus by Herodotus
Cambyses, by the advice of a certain Egyptian, who was angry with Amasis for having torn him from his wife and children and given him over to the Persians, had sent a herald to Amasis to ask his daughter in marriage.
Even Cambyses himself was touched with pity, and he forthwith gave an order that the son of Psammenitus should be spared from the number of those appointed to die, and Psammenitus himself brought from the suburb into his presence.
If then, at this time, Cambyses, seeing what was happening, had confessed himself in the wrong, and led his army back, he would have done the wisest thing that he could after the mistake made at the outset; but as it was, he took no manner of heed, but continued to march forwards.
classics.mit.edu /Herodotus/history.3.iii.html   (10656 words)

  
 Cambyses II - OnlineEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
After the death of his father in the spring of 528 BCE, Cambyses became sole king.
Cambyses had prepared for the march through the desert by an alliance with Arab chieftains, who brought a large supply of water to the stations.
Meanwhile in Persia a usurper, the Magian Gaumata, arose in the spring of 522 BCE, who pretended to be the murdered Bardiya (Smerdis) and was acknowledged throughout Asia.
www.neareasternarchaeology.com /encyclopedia/index.php/Kambujiya_II   (980 words)

  
 History of Iran: Cambyses (Kamboujyeh)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Cambyses successfully managed the crossing of the hostile Sinai Desert, traditionally Egypt's first and strongest line of defense, and brought the Egyptians under Psamtik III, son and successor of Ahmose, to battle at Pelusium.
In 522 BCE news reached Cambyses of a revolt in Iran led by an impostor claiming to be Bardiya, Cambyses' brother.
Cambyses has been rather mistreated in the sources, thanks partly to the prejudices of Herodotus' Egyptian informers and partly to the propaganda motives of Darius I. Cambyses is reported to have ruled the Egyptians harshly and to have desecrated the irreligious ceremonies and shrines.
iranchamber.com /history/cambyses/cambyses.php   (380 words)

  
 Catholic Biblical Quarterly, The: Daniel's Portrait of Antiochus IV: Echoes of a Persian King   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Herodotus states that Cambyses dies in Ecbatana of Syria, not to be confused with Ecbatana of Media (3.64).
Earlier in Herodotus's account of Cambyses, the Persian king has a dream in which a messenger comes to him with the news that his brother Smerdis is sitting on the royal throne with his head touching the heavens (3.30).
Cambyses realizes that he was deceived by his dream and that he has killed the wrong Smerdis.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3679/is_200407/ai_n9442410/pg_3   (1448 words)

  
 Cambyses
Cambyses was the son and successor of Cyrus the Great.
But he had a repute of madness and despotism which led to palace struggles for the succession and, despite what Herodotus says, it is possible that he was in fact assassinated upon order of one of his brothers, Smerdis, which he himself tried to have assassinated.
The story of Cambyses is told by Herodotus in the first part of book III of his Histories (III, 1-38 and 61-66).
plato-dialogues.org /tools/char/cambyses.htm   (479 words)

  
 A Commentary on Cambyses   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The one major achievement of Cambyses in the conquest of Egypt which was fantastically wealthy.
Cambyses does his best to rule as an Egyptian pharaoh according to archaeological evidence, which is again a similar tactic used by his father, but again Herodotus does not mention this.
Udjahorresne was also in charge of the navy, so as a result the navy did not attack Cambyses at all, yet Herodotus does not even mention the name of Udjahorresne as he would be seen as a traitor by the Egyptians and they would have not given Herodotus any information about him.
www.herodotuswebsite.co.uk /cambyses.htm   (1226 words)

  
 Egypt: Cambyses II, the First Persian Ruler of Egypt And His Lost Army
In one, Cambyses II had requested an Egyptian princess for a wife, or actually a concubine, and was angered when he found that he had been sent a lady of second rate standing.
Cambyses II had also planned a military campaign against Carthage, but this too was aborted because, on this occasion, the king's Phoenician sea captains refused to attack their kinfolk who had founded the Carthagian colony towards the end of the 8th century BC.
Yet if true, Cambyses II probably sent his army to Siwa Oasis in the Western Desert to seek (or seize) legitimization of his rule from the oracle of Amun, much as Alexander the Great would do in the 4th century BC.
touregypt.net /featurestories/cambyses2.htm   (2395 words)

  
 Cambyses - International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
It is variously said that she was Cassandane, a Persian princess, Amytis, a Median princess, or Nititis, a daughter of Apries king of Egypt.
Cambyses organized an expedition for the conquest of Egypt, which was rendered successful by internal treachery and by the aid of the Phoenician, Cyprian and Greek fleets.
Shortly after this, Cambyses heard that a certain Magian, who claimed to be his brother Smerdes whom he had secretly put to death, had set himself up as king of Persia, and that almost the whole of his Asiatic dominions had acknowledged him as king.
www.studylight.org /enc/isb/view.cgi?number=T1815   (713 words)

  
 Dynasty 27 - Cambyses, Darius The Great
Having skillfully and successfully led his army across the deserts which separate the two continents, Cambyses met and defeated the Egyptians in front of their city at Pelusium in 525 BC just a few weeks after the death of Pharaoh Amasis of the 19th/26th Dynasty when Psammetichus II was king.
Cambyses II had thought that the Persian summer capital of Ecbatana had been meant and that he would therefore die in old age.
Later Darius was in Egypt with Cambyses II, the son of Cyrus and heir to his kingdom, as a member of the royal bodyguard.
www.crystalinks.com /dynasty27.html   (3833 words)

  
 Egypt: Cambyses II, the First Persian Ruler of Egypt And His Lost Army
In one, Cambyses II had requested an Egyptian princess for a wife, or actually a concubine, and was angered when he found that he had been sent a lady of second rate standing.
Cambyses II had also planned a military campaign against Carthage, but this too was aborted because, on this occasion, the king's Phoenician sea captains refused to attack their kinfolk who had founded the Carthagian colony towards the end of the 8th century BC.
Yet if true, Cambyses II probably sent his army to Siwa Oasis in the Western Desert to seek (or seize) legitimization of his rule from the oracle of Amun, much as Alexander the Great would do in the 4th century BC.
www.touregypt.net /featurestories/cambyses2.htm   (2395 words)

  
 Who is Cambyses?
Cambyses had a younger brother, Smerdis, who either headed a revolt or was suspected of planning one.
So Cambyses, when setting out with his army for the Egyptian war, left Smerdis, who was the only heir to his throne, safe in imprisonment-or so the empire believed.
Only Cambyses himself knew that this report could not be true, since Smerdis was dead; and even Cambyses, shaken by guilt and despair, wavered in his belief.
www.publicbookshelf.com /public_html/The_Story_of_the_Greatest_Nations_and_the_Worlds_Famous_Events_Vol_1/whoisca_bac.html   (1220 words)

  
 Cambyses I
Cambyses (Old Persian Kambujiya): son of king Cyrus of Anšan, member of the Achaemenid dynasty, ruling as king in Anšan, the central part of Persia.
According to the Greek researcher Herodotus, Cambyses was married to Mandane, the daughter of the
This boy was born in or about 576 BCE, which leads to the conclusion that Cambyses was born somewhere c.600.
www.livius.org /caa-can/cambyses_I/cambyses_I.html   (200 words)

  
 Cambyses 2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Cambyses greatest achievement was the conquest of Egypt, which had been planned by his father, Cyrus 2 the Great.
Cambyses 2 was said to suffer from mental illness, being involved in many atrocities, killing a brother and a sister and finally committing suicide.
The Lost Army of Cambyses relates to the account that Cambyses had 50,000 troops sent out to cross the Western Desert and conquer the oasis of Siwa.
i-cias.com /e.o/cambyses2.htm   (300 words)

  
 Cambyses I of Anshan -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
According to (The ancient Greek known as the father of history; his accounts of the wars between the Greeks and Persians are the first known examples of historical writing (425-485 BC)) Herodotus, Cambyses was "a man of good family and quiet habits".
According to (The ancient Greek known as the father of history; his accounts of the wars between the Greeks and Persians are the first known examples of historical writing (425-485 BC)) Herodotus, Cyaxares chose Cambyses as a son-in-law because he considered him to pose no threat to the Medean throne.
This was not the case with Cyrus II who would grow to depose his grandfather.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/c/ca/cambyses_i_of_anshan.htm   (301 words)

  
 Persian History
Cambyses desecrated the body of Amasis, in his frustration that Amasis died before Cambyses arrived.
Cambyses once asked Prexaspes (who was a message carrier) what the people thought of their king.
Cambyses, on his death bed, told the Persians that he had killed his brother, but this was not believed at first.
mcadams.posc.mu.edu /txt/ah/Herodotus/Persia.html   (2986 words)

  
 Military Trivia
Cambyses II, Emperor of Persia, conquered Egypt in 525 B.C. and installed his family as the ruling 27th Dynasty, having rid himself of Psamtek (bless you!) III, the last truly Egyptian ruler of Egypt until the 20th Century.
There are some disputes as to why Cambyses decided to invade Egypt, but all of them revolved around women.
The soldiers of Cambyses were well-armed with swords, spears, chariots and other weapons which represented the cutting edge (pardon?) of the military technology of the time.
www.angelfire.com /tx4/bustersbattery/MILITRIVIA.html   (405 words)

  
 Aurelian's Archives   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Cambyses led his army upriver beyond the cataracts of Aswan without making adequate provisions for supplies, and his army was soon reduced to such desperate straits in the Nubian wilderness that the campaign had to be abandoned.
Herodotus further reports that Cambyses was later angered when he saw Egyptians celebrating at a festival as he was making his way back up the Nile, because he thought they were celebrating his recent disasters — the kind of concrete detail that has a real ring of verisimilitude.
Cambyses plainly did meditate further conquests, as his Nubian expedition demonstrates; conversely, the failure of the Nubian expedition meant that there was no need to invent a disaster to account for the end of Cambyses’ further efforts, for one such disaster had in fact occurred.
www.ancientworlds.net /aw/Journals/Journal/172631   (2571 words)

  
 Cambyses II --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Cambyses was the son of Cyrus I and succeeded his father in Anshan (northwest of Susa in Elam) as a vassal of King Astyages of Media.
According to the 5th-century-BC Greek historian Herodotus, Cambyses married a daughter of Astyages, by whom he became the father of Cyrus II the Great.
There may have been some degree of unrest throughout the empire at the time of Cyrus's death, for Cambyses apparently felt it necessary to secretly kill his brother, Bardiya (Smerdis), in order to protect his rear while leading the campaign against Egypt in 525.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9018784?tocId=9018784   (886 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Cambyses II   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Encyclopedia: Cambyses II Updated 277 days 2 hours 29 minutes ago.
Cambyses II (Persian Kambujiya), was the name borne by the son of Cyrus the Great.
 (http://touregypt.net/featurestories/cambyses2.htm) A 2002 novel by Paul Sussman The Lost Army Of Cambyses (ISBN 0593048768) recounts the story of rival archaeological expeditions searching for the remains.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Cambyses-II   (904 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.