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Topic: Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics


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In the News (Sun 21 Jul 19)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
Canadian Aboriginal syllabic writing (often "syllabics" for short) is a family of abugidas used to write a number of Aboriginal Canadian languages of the Algonquian, Athabaskan, and Inuit language families.
Canadian syllabics are presently used to write all of the Cree dialects from Naskapi (spoken in Quebec) to the Rocky Mountains, including Eastern Cree, James Bay Cree, Swampy Cree and Plains Cree.
Syllabics are also used to write other Algonquian languages, such as the major Ojibwe dialects in Western Canada and Blackfoot, and to write Inuktitut in the eastern Canadian Arctic.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Canadian_Aboriginal_Syllabics   (4315 words)

  
  tScholars.com | Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Canadian Aboriginal syllabic writing (often "syllabics" for short) is a family of abugidas used to write a number of Aboriginal Canadian languages of the Algonquian, Athabaskan, and Inuit language families.
Canadian syllabics are presently used to write all of the Cree dialects from Naskapi (spoken in Quebec) to the Rocky Mountains, including Eastern Cree, James Bay Cree, Swampy Cree and Plains Cree.
Syllabics are also used to write other Algonquian languages, such as the major Ojibwe dialects in Western Canada and Blackfoot, and to write Inuktitut in the eastern Canadian arctic.
www.tscholars.com /encyclopedia/Unified_Canadian_Aboriginal_Syllabics   (4350 words)

  
 Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Canadian aboriginal syllabic writing (often "syllabics" for short) is a family of writing schemes which are used to write a number of aboriginal Canadian languages from the Algonquian, Athabaskan and Inuit language families.
Canadian syllabics are presently used to write all of the Cree dialects from Naskapi (spoken in Quebec) west to the Rocky Mountains, including Eastern Cree, James Bay Cree, Swampy Cree and Plains Cree.
Syllabics are occasionally used in the United States by Native communities that straddle the border, but are principally a Canadian phenomena.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/c/ca/canadian_aboriginal_syllabics.html   (3775 words)

  
 Syllabics
The syllabics were originally designed for Ojibwe by the Reverend James Evans, who was refused permission to print in them by his missionary society.
The Déné Syllabics are part of the Canadian aboriginal syllabics range in the international UNICODE standard.
Syllabics are not very widely used anymore, but there has been a resurgence in interest.
www.ydli.org /dakinfo/dulkwah.htm   (1016 words)

  
 Inuktitut Sylabics
The syllabic writing system was meant to be mechanically printed right from the onset, and Evans actually produced crude letterpress forms with the scant materials he had available.
The font is also the first syllabic design that rejects not only the word-recognition evolution of western typography, but the poorly adapted designs of previous Inuktitut syllabic fonts as well.
Standardization of many aspects of syllabics are needed, including sorting methods, text processing tools as well as transcoders for the vast majority of computers that can't use Unicode and for Inuit in other regions that do not read syllabics.
www.itk.ca /communications/technology-syllabics.php   (1880 words)

  
 Definition of Cree syllabics
Cree syllabics are the variations on Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics that are used to write Cree language dialects.
Eastern Cree syllabics are used by Cree dialects east of the Manitoba-Ontario border, and Western Cree syllabics are used by Cree speakers west of that line.
Not all eastern Cree dialects are written with syllabics - the dialects of eastern Quebec use the Roman alphabet.
www.wordiq.com /definition/Cree_syllabics   (361 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
[3] By then, both Protestant and Catholic missionaries were using and actively propagating syllabic writing.
In order to accommodate 6 different vowels, Dakelh and Sekani use all four vowel orientations and indicate the two additional vowels by placing a dot or a horizontal line into the rightward pointing form.
Among Dakelh and Sekani users, a well developed Roman alphabet has effectively replaced syllabics, which are now understood almost exclusively by elderly members of the community.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Canadian_Aboriginal_Syllabics   (3915 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
Aboriginal peoples in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit.
Eskimo-Aleut languages Eskimo-Aleut is a language family native to Greenland, the Canadian Arctic, Alaska, and parts of Siberia.
Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut).
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Canadian-Aboriginal-Syllabics   (1496 words)

  
 2002-11: Repertoire Expansion in the Universal Character Set for Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
The impetus behind this proposal is based on a current difficulty in Canadian cataloging--the use of Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics (CAS), which is a writing system used for the Cree and Inuktitut languages.
The Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics (CAS) writing system was created by James Evans, a Wesleyan missionary in what is now Manitoba in 1840.
Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics can be found at: Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics.
www.loc.gov /marc/marbi/2002/2002-11.html   (696 words)

  
 Inuit: Canadian Inuit
In Greenland and the Canadian Arctic semi-permanent sod and whalebone dwellings were replaced by what has now become the symbol of the Inuit in many minds: temporary snow houses known as igloos.
Canadian Inuit struggle with some of the highest rates of alcoholism and drug abuse in the nation.
Inuit infant mortality rates are two to three times higher than the Canadian national average, life expectancy is about five to seven years shorter, and the suicide rate is six times higher.
www.lycos.com /info/inuit--canadian-inuit.html?page=2   (571 words)

  
 Proposed pDAM for Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
This proposal is being presented by the Canadian Standards Association with full support from the Canadian Government, CASEC (Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics Encoding Committee), as well as from coding and script experts in Ireland and the United Kingdom.
Syllabics text is in common use for aboriginal items such as newspapers, magazines, books, educational materials etc.; the BMP is the appropriate plane for the Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics repertoire to be encoded.
Syllabics were first invented in the late 1830's by James Evans for Algonquian languages and, as other communities and linguistic groups adopted the script, the main structural principles described above were adopted as well.
www.evertype.com /standards/sl/n1441-en.html   (2557 words)

  
 Canadian_Aboriginal_Syllabics
Chipewyan and Slavey use the final "?" before syllables and lowered to the midline to indicate the complex consontant cluser at the beginning of a syllable.
The early developers of Inuktitut syllabics were English speakers who could not clearly distinguish between the Inuktitut sound and the glottal consonant, and did not adequately recognise the difference between the and sounds.
Naskapi, unlike other Cree variants, has a small number of syllables that start with complex consonant clusters -,, and - which must be treated separately from the rest of the syllabary.
www.printpromotionguide.com /article.php?t=Canadian_Aboriginal_Syllabics   (2812 words)

  
 Monotype: Non Latin Font
The core of the script now known as “Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics” was first conceived in the mind of one James Evans in the early 1800s.
Eventually, this system of writing came to be known as “Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics”.
In the recently declared (1999) Canadian region known as the Nunavut Territory, Canadian Syllabics shares the title of “Official Script” with the Latin script, and is used for the writing of the Inuit language.
www.monotypefonts.com /Library/Non-Latin-Library.asp?show=info&lan=cansyllabic   (279 words)

  
 2002-DP06: Repertoire Expansion in the Universal Character Set for Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
The desirability of eventual expansion in a UCS framework, however, was recognized even when DP73 was written, and repeated in Proposal 98-18 (section 1.1), which considered the restriction temporary until expansion proposals were prepared and approved.
The impetus behind this discussion paper is based on a current difficulty in Canadian cataloging--the use of Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics (CAS), which is a writing system used for the Cree and Inuktitut languages.
The adoption of the expanded CAS set is required based on whatever policy decision is made by a particular library about the use of Model A (transliteration plus parallel vernacular 880 fields) or Model B (simple multiscript records with no parallel fields) for multiscript records.
www.loc.gov /marc/marbi/2002/2002-dp06.html   (1483 words)

  
 Is the Syllabics orthography an Abugida?
Syllabics could also be analysed as an alphabetic system with syllabic elements, although support for this would be fairly weak; the syllabic characters make up the majority of symbols in the orthography, and glyphs in a text.
Syllabics is a unique writing system, and should not be grouped as an alphabet, syllabary, or abugida.
Yet under the current guidelines, I do not believe that syllabics fits anywhere; it certainly breaks (or stretches to breaking point) most of the abugida rules, and syllabics is not alphabetic.
www.languagegeek.com /syl/abugida.html   (1589 words)

  
 Canadian Syllabics Unicode Fonts
Note: Extensive coverage of Latin and Cyrillic characters with diacritics as well as Canadian Syllabic characters that were omitted from the Unicode Standard (encoded in the private use area).
The Unicode implementation of Canadian Syllabics is described in chapter 13 (Additional Modern Scripts) of The Unicode Standard, Version 5.0.
Names, images, properties and additional background/non-technical information about the Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics Unicode block and its characters can be found on decodeunicode's Canadian Syllabics block page (in English and German/Deutsch).
www.wazu.jp /gallery/Fonts_Canadian.html   (836 words)

  
 Inuktitut syllabics - Definition, explanation
It is one variation on Canadian aboriginal syllabic writing, and can be digitally encoded using the Unicode standard.
The Unicode block for Inuktitut characters is called Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics.
Other missionaries, and later linguists in the employ of the Canadian and American governments, adapted the Latin alphabet to the dialects of the Mackenzie River delta, the western Arctic islands and Alaska.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/i/in/inuktitut_syllabics.php   (534 words)

  
 Universal Syllabic Translator - Introduction
If they (the native people) need to write a text in aboriginal language or a dialect, write a text in the transliteration in "Roman character orthography", instead of using aboriginal syllabic glyphs, because it is easier, and no knowledge of syllabic glyphs is necessary.
Loss of native languages, especially dialects in the written form (syllabic orthography) is de facto done (except of Nunavut, where the new government language program is in force).
To this translation system can be added practically any aboriginal language (and their main and local dialects), which is using syllabic orthography for written expression of language.
pisimoyapi.com /ust   (861 words)

  
 Cree syllabics at AllExperts
Cree syllabics are the variations on Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics that are used to write Cree language dialects.
Eastern Cree syllabics are used by Cree dialects east of the Manitoba-Ontario border, and Western Cree syllabics are used by Cree speakers west of that line.
The two syllabic writing systems diverge primarily in the way they indicate consonants appearing at the ends of syllables, the way they mark the semi-consonant /w/, and in order to reflect the phonological differences between Cree dialects.
en.allexperts.com /e/c/cr/cree_syllabics.htm   (487 words)

  
 WATS.ca - web accessibility technical services | Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
Evans, a Wesleyan (Methodist) missionary stationed on the western shore of Hudson's Bay in the mid 1800's, wanted to give the local Ojibwe population the ability to read the Bible in their own language.
Ronald Ogawa of St. Catherines Ontario has also created an Aboriginal Syllabics TTF font - Ballymun RO - which may be downloaded from http://nexus.brocku.ca/rogawa/ucas/install.html.
It offers a fallback behaviour for characters no glyph can be found for by displaying a glyph which represents the Unicode block it came from - which at least gives you a clue in finding an appropriate font to display it properly.
www.wats.ca /show.php?contentid=41   (803 words)

  
 The glory of instant celebrity: Toki Pona in Canadian Aboriginal syllabics
As it turned out, Canadian syllabics isn't optimal for the native languages.
Not surprisingly, Code2000 features all the Canadian syllabic signs - which is a quite staggering amount, as a matter of fact, and Unicode doesn't even include them all (Great Lake Aboriginal Syllabics are missing, for instance).
There is however a straight-forward workaround available, as Canadian syllabics can note long vowels as well (a feature not all of the indigenous languages use).
www.deadlybrain.org /projects/tokipona/canadian.php   (399 words)

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