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Topic: Canadian Confederation


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  Confederation College - Homepage. Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
As a component of the committee’s action plan, a one week camp was designed to introduce the region’s Aboriginal youth to the exciting world of aviation.
Highway was on-hand to launch the program at Confederation College today as part of an initiative to take the material to First Nations across Canada.
Our main campus (with 6 regional campuses) is situated on 130 acres of park-like property located in the heart of the city of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
www.confederationc.on.ca   (340 words)

  
  Road to Canadian Confederation quiz -- free game
"Confederation in Canada was the result of a combination of circumstances.
Bearing in mind that an assassination is for political reasons and a murder is for personal reasons, one of the Fathers of Confederation was assassinated and one murdered.
The governor of the Province of Canada was instrumental in encouraging the success of Confederation, so much so that his term was extended so that he could be the Governor General of the new Dominion.
www.funtrivia.com /playquiz.cfm?qid=184179&origin=   (339 words)

  
 Canadian Red Ensign - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Canadian Red Ensign is the former Flag of Canada, though it was never adopted as official by the Parliament of Canada.
From 1865 until Canadian Confederation in 1867, the United Province of Canada could also have used a blue ensign, but there is little evidence such a flag was ever used.
Today, two Canadian provincial flags are Red Ensigns, the flag of Ontario and the flag of Manitoba, both of which were introduced when the Canadian Red Ensign was replaced by the Maple Leaf Flag.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Canadian_Red_Ensign   (823 words)

  
 Canadian Confederation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Canadian Confederation, or the Confederation of Canada, was the process by which a federal dominion – called the Dominion of Canada – was formed beginning 1 July 1867 among the provinces, colonies, and territories of British North America.
In a Canadian context, Confederation generally describes the political process that united the colonies in the 1860s and related events, and the subsequent incorporation of other colonies and territories.
The original "confederation" gathering was by delegates of the four Atlantic region colonies at Charlottetown in September 1864, with the agenda being a discussion of a Maritime Union (or Atlantic Union).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Canadian_Confederation   (1576 words)

  
 Canadian Genealogy Resources
Canadian Genealogy is the Host for AHGP Canada
Few passages of history are more striking than those which record the efforts of the earlier French Jesuits to convert the Indians.
The Dawn of Canadian History, A Chronicle of Aboriginal Canada
www.canadiangenealogy.net   (691 words)

  
 Confederation Rejected: Newfoundland and the Canadian Confederation, 1864-1869: Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage
Confederation Rejected: Newfoundland and the Canadian Confederation, 1864-1869: Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage
However, the opposition to confederation was so vocal that the government decided against asking the House of Assembly to vote on the Quebec resolutions in the 1865 session.
Nor was confederation made a central issue in the general election that year.
www.heritage.nf.ca /law/debate.html   (815 words)

  
 Confederation of National Trade Unions
Confederation of National Trade Unions (CNTU, or Confédération des syndicats nationaux, CSN) was called the Canadian Catholic Confederation of Labour (CCCL) from its beginnings in 1921 until 1960, when the organization abandoned its religious identity.
Anxious to unite their forces, they jointly formed the Canadian Catholic Confederation of Labour in 1921 with about 17 600 members.
In 1960 the confederation dropped "Catholic" from its title (it became the Confederation of National Trade Unions) and dropped references to the SOCIAL DOCTRINE of the church from its statement of principles.
www.canadianencyclopedia.ca /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0001844   (701 words)

  
 confed
One was Confederation itself, the constitutional arrangements which created a central government and an economic union strong enough to pursue a course of economic development independent of the United States.
The Confederation Debates indicate that some of the proponents of a federal union of the British North American colonies were mainly concerned with the Maritimes and central Canada per se.
When Canadian overtures to Washington were rebuffed, and with the onset of the severe recession of the early 1870s, protectionist sentiment grew in Canada and the federal election of 1874 was contested largely around this issue.
www.chass.utoronto.ca /~reak/ssc/confed.htm   (3412 words)

  
 Canadian dollar at AllExperts
The Canadian dollar is the monetary basis for the Canadian economy, with all coins manufactured by the Royal Canadian Mint and all bills manufactured by the Canadian Bank Note Company.
The standard set of faces has Canadian symbols (primarily wildlife) on the reverse, and an effigy of Elizabeth II on the obverse.
From 1952 to 1960, the Canadian dollar traded at a slight premium over the US dollar, reaching a high of US$1.0614 on 20 August 1957 (the all-time high of US$2.78 was reached on 11 July 1864 after the United States had temporarily abandoned the gold standard).
en.allexperts.com /e/c/ca/canadian_dollar.htm   (1451 words)

  
 John A. Macdonald, Confederation and Canadian Federalism - Studies on the Canadian Constitution and Canadian Federalism ...
Canadian politician, statesman and Father of Confederation (1815-1891).
His role in the several conferences prior to Confederation was vital and he emerged easily as the political leader of the scattered colonies of British North America.
The history of the first 25 years of Confederation under Macdonald is but one long attempt to implement his program of strengthening the federal government at the expense of local autonomy.
www2.marianopolis.edu /quebechistory/federal/johna.htm   (757 words)

  
 Confederation and Canadian National Policy
Confederation, Dominion Status, transcontinentalization and the First and Second National Policies were North American elements in the general evolution of the British Empire.
It was a central Canadian regional policy, adopted nationally in a period in which Imperial policy, continental North American entanglements, and the policy aspirations of the other regions of Canada did not stand in the way.
This allowed Innis, in his concern with a later period of development, to associate the tariff of 1878 with subsequent transcontinental railway construction and the export of wheat from the Prairies; and, incidentally, to suggest that there was a continuous development from the tariff of 1858 to the early twentieth century western wheat economy.
www.upei.ca /~rneill/canechist/topic_14.html   (8361 words)

  
 Canadian Confederation Web Resources for Students
Confederation was the response of British North America (BNA) to a vast range of challenges and opportunities above and beyond the influence of the American Civil War.
However, such Civil War-related incidents as the Trent Affair, the Chesapeake Incident, the St. Albans Raid, abrogation of the Reciprocity Treaty, the Alabama Claims, the Fenian War, and the ever-present Fear of Annexation all contributed to the ultimate union.
The most concrete BNA steps on the path to Confederation were the Charlottetown Conference and the Quebec Conference of 1864.
www.cdli.ca /CITE/canada8.htm   (227 words)

  
 On Canadian Confederation by Sir John Alexander Macdonald. Great Britain: III. (1865-1906). Vol. V. Bryan, William ...
The subject, however, tho looked upon with favor by the country, and tho there were no distinct expressions of opposition to it from any party, did not begin to assume its present proportions until the last session.
In the proposed constitution all matters of general interest are to be dealt with by the general legislature; while the local legislatures will deal with matters of local interest which do not affect the confederation as a whole, but are of the greatest importance to their particular sections.
The whole scheme of confederation as propounded by the conference as agreed to and sanctioned by the Canadian government, and as now presented for the consideration of the people and the legislature, bears upon its face the marks of compromise.
www.bartleby.com /268/5/1.html   (1884 words)

  
 Canadian Confederation information - Search.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Canadian Confederation, or the Confederation of Canada, was the process by which a federal dominion – called the Dominion of Canada – was formed as of July 1, 1867, from the various provinces, colonies, and territories of British North America.
In a Canadian context, Confederation generally describes the political process that united the colonies in the 1860s and related events, and the subsequent incorporation of other colonies and territories.
The original "confederation" gathering was by delegates of the four Atlantic region colonies at Charlottetown in September 1864, with the agenda being a discussion of a Maritime Union (or Atlantic Union).
www.search.com /reference/Canadian_Confederation   (1511 words)

  
 INTERPROVINCIAL BARRIERS ARE UNDERMINING THE CANADIAN CONFEDERATION
Most Canadians will be able to understand the harmful effects the US lumber tariff will have on communities located in the lumber producing regions of the country, all because of high-handed protectionist political behaviour.
The other group is composed of Canadian citizens living in other regions of the country, the producers, who will have to suffer denial of economic opportunity or hardship as a result of expedient political behaviour occuring elsewhere in Canada.
The possible slow breakdown of confederation would be in marked contrast to the possibility of a rapid break-up of confederation that would follow a majority pro-sovereignty vote taken in a Quebec-style independence referendum.
www.quebecoislibre.org /020831-10.htm   (1730 words)

  
 The Confounding Fathers of Canadian Confederation
If they did, then Ontario and Quebec are two distinct societies with complete control over their own internal affairs, but agreeing to show a united front to the world, (for the 'world', read USA) by acting as a league of two nations.
The colonies in the Confederation have dwindled in status to become mere provinces, or regional divisions, of a country for  administrative purposes.
They joined a Confederation of self-governing colonies, (although some were never real colonies) but became provinces in a Federal Canada.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Crete/4182/EA09.html   (687 words)

  
 Dean's World: Ameri-Canadian Confederation?
Canadian Mark Steyn mentions some of the reasons why I think this sort of thing unlikely.
Canadians mock Americans for not knowing anything about Canada, but while Canadians tend to know some American geography, most have no grasp on the American mindset.
For Canadians who want the same gun rights that I enjoy, if they cannot get rid of their Euro-focused socialist national government or some of the provincial governments of similar mind cast, then let them migrate down here as individuals and live under the Constitution of the United States.
www.deanesmay.com /archives/000693.html   (1469 words)

  
 Confederation of Canadian Unions
Founded in 1969 on the initiative of veteran labour organizers Kent ROWLEY and Madeleine PARENT, the Confederation of Canadian Unions (originally the Council of Canadian Unions 1969-73) is dedicated to the establishment of a democratic, independent Canadian labour movement free of the influence of American-based international unions.
The CCU has been a progressive leader in the struggle for workers' rights and social justice for all Canadians and was the first labour federation in Canada to call for equal pay for work of equal value.
Although the CCU accounts for only a tiny percentage of organized labour in Canada, its appeals for independence and new members have influenced the creation of autonomy guidelines within many international unions and encouraged some independent breakaways.
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0001843   (176 words)

  
 Michael Suddard's Homepage - The French Canadians and the Birth of Confederation
This interest in the Confederation era may be due to the fact of his interest in the study of law.
The historians who have written about the birth of Confederation have taken into account the participation of the French Canadians in the events and have briefly analysed their attitudes, but no thorough study has been devoted to his subject as a whole.
The Canadian Historical Association, when choosing the articles for their booklet series, seeks to convey to the average Canadian the events that have helped to shape the current Canadian nation state.
www.michaelsuddard.com /frenchcanadians.html   (2060 words)

  
 The Canadian Senate In Focus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The Fathers of Confederation chose not to apply the principle of equal provincial representation in the Senate due to Canada's singular situation whereby one of its largest and most populous provinces also embodied a cultural and linguistic minority in the country.
The Fathers of Confederation were perhaps predisposed to the idea of an appointed upper chamber due to the experience of many of the provinces.
In the first sixty years after Confederation (1867 - 1927), approximately 180 bills were passed by the House of Commons and sent to the Senate that subsequently did not receive Royal Assent either because they were rejected by the Senate or were passed by the Senate with amendments that were not accepted by the Commons.
www.parl.gc.ca /information/about/process/senate/legisfocus/focus-e.htm   (10822 words)

  
 Causes of Confederation
Creighton states that the building of the Intercolonial Railway, pressure from the United States and especially the Fenians, the quest for westward expansion, "deadlock" in the Canadian Legislature, and intervention from the imperial government, are the causes of Confederation.
Martin believes that the roots of Confederation came long before the pivotal year of 1864, however it was the ambition of Upper Canadian politicians that helped push it through to become an act of the British parliament in early 1867.
Martin also believes that Confederation was fought in not necessarily the colonies' best interests', but possibly in the interests of some of the so called "Fathers of Confederation".
members.tripod.com /pikarob/confederation.html   (915 words)

  
 Bambooweb: Canadian Confederation
Canadian Confederation, or the Confederation of Canada, was the process that ultimately brought together a union among the provinces, colonies and territories of British North America to form a Dominion of the British Empire, which today is a federal
In Quebec, the idea that the new confederal Canada was a pact between two founding peoples dominated the political discourse for almost a century (1867 to 1960s).
Confederation was first agreed upon at the Charlottetown Conference in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island in 1864, although Prince Edward Island did not actually join Confederation until 1873.
www.bambooweb.com /articles/c/a/Canadian_Confederation.html   (936 words)

  
 Horton Journal of Canadian History
The Canadian Confederation was established in 1867 under the promise, of Sir John A. Macdonald, that a railway would be built stretching from coast to coast.
Prince Edward Island saw Confederation as burdensome and would probably have "stayed out of the Confederation for many years, if it had not decided to build it’s own railway." (Bliss, 65) The cost of a railway was far more than predicted.
Whereas the other provinces that had joined the Confederation had to be pleaded with, it was now a province’s turn to plead to be allowed to join.
www.angelfire.com /ns2/hjch2001/Faulkenham.htm   (1539 words)

  
 Canadian Confederation at opensource encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
In light of the evolution of Canada, the term confederation is today perceived as mostly a ruse by John A. Macdonald and others to encourage French Canada and the maritime colonies to come to the talks.
Canada thus became a federation, but certainly not a confederation, such as Switzerland.
Meanwhile, the idea that the new confederal Canada was a pact between two founding peoples dominated the political discourse for almost in century in Quebec.
www.wiki.tatet.com /Canadian_Confederation.html   (764 words)

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