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Topic: Canadian and American health care systems compared


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In the News (Fri 22 Mar 19)

  
 Perspectives on the European Health Care Systems: Some Lessons for America
Indeed, with the current systems in place, and with the current sources of funding, and given the aging of the population, there is an enormous shortfall in health care funding which is constantly growing.
If health care is rationed and patients' access to a treatment or a drug they need is blocked because of budget limits, it is hardly relevant to them whether the rationing authority is the government, a sickness fund, a health maintenance organization, or an insurance company.
A health care organization that is truly based on competence could serve its clients without having to recruit between 20 and 30 million new employees (the number that was considered necessary to meet the health care needs of Western Europe in the next generation).
www.heritage.org /Research/HealthCare/HL711.cfm   (14744 words)

  
 Socialized Medicine: The Canadian Experience   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
This extensive national health system was begun in the late 1950s with a system of publicly funded hospital insurance, and completed in the late 1960s and early 1970s when comprehensive health insurance was put into place.
Indeed, the purpose of a public health system is to relieve this artificial shortage by supplying the missing quantities.
Health care has to be rationed either by the market or by political and bureaucratic processes.
www.self-gov.org /freeman/8903lemi.html   (3049 words)

  
 American University Library - Health and Fitness Mediagraphy
Examines the lack of health care on the Navajo reservation and the struggles of Navajo health care workers.
Explores the ethical dilemmas in neonatal and pediatric medicine faced by health care professionals and the emotional process experienced by the parents of critically ill infants.
In the intensive care units the nurses discuss decision-making in the medical hierarchy, describe their frustration with clinical responsibilities that are not matched with authority and relate the agonizing dilemma of bringing pain to children who may not heal.
www.library.american.edu /subject/media/health.html   (3618 words)

  
 American Health -- Recommendations and Resources   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The comparison of the health care systems of Canada and the United States is of great importance to both nations.
In the United States, meanwhile, Canada's monopsonistic health system is seen by different sides of the ideological spectrum as either a model to be followed or avoided.
Health can be defined negatively, as the absence of illness, functionally, as the ability to cope with everyday activities, or positively, as fitness and well-being.
www.becomingapediatrician.com /health/4/american-health.html   (1685 words)

  
 American Exceptionalism in the Health Sector
American attitudes about equity with regard to health care were formed in the nineteenth century as large numbers of immigrants settled in the country's urban centers.
Following directly from the first characteristic of the American policy response is the absence of institutional structures in the United States for negotiating between major groups of health care providers and the government or an NHI board of directors, or both.
Comparative analysts of health systems have produced a large literature that provides profiles of health care systems abroad.(9) There is even a two-volume bibliographic manual with appropriate taxonomies and summaries of relevant research (Elling 1980).
www.nyu.edu /projects/rodwin/american.html   (11607 words)

  
 The best Information on Cost Of American Health Care at Health Care Cost   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
It is the managed care mission at American Health Canadian and American health care systems compared cost of American health care it did not fundamentally change the system.
Canadian and American health care systems compared cost of American health care it did not fundamentally change the system.
Richardson said details of his health care and minimum wage proposals are still being fine-tuned but those issues will be part of his agenda for the 2007 Legislature if he wins re-election.
fluvirusnews.com /health-care-cost/cost-of-american-health-care.php   (1043 words)

  
 "Health Care Forum" by Adam Gopnik and Malcolm Gladwell
Canadians will argue until they're blue in the face that, in fact, the sacrifices in quality care are not that great.
When you say the Canadian system is good for women, what you mean is that it's designed to be a system of care, that is, it's a non-heroic system, and its emphasis is on non-heroic medicine.
The American system is one of those systems that looks horrible from the outside, but to those who actually participate in it, they begin to appreciate what is specific and wonderful about the system.
www.washingtonmonthly.com /features/2000/0003.gladwellgopnik.html   (7759 words)

  
 Cloning Canadian Health Care, by Robert W. Lee
Heritage Foundation health care policy analyst Edmund F. Haislmaier contends that the pattern emerging in Canada is "eerily similar to that found in other nationalized health care systems.
Health policy analyst Edmund Haislmaier observes: "The perceived lower rate of Canadian spending results from differences in the economies and demographics of the two countries, and not from differences in the efficiency of their health care financing systems.
The study speculated that the new taxes required to fund such a system would entail raising the combined employer-employee payroll tax from 15 percent to 29 percent, or raising income tax rates for everyone by 14 percent, or imposing a new national sales tax of 10 percent.
reformed-theology.org /jbs/html/cloning_canadian_health_care.htm   (1093 words)

  
 U.S. lobbies notwithstanding, Canada's health care is superior   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Canadian workers aren’t trapped in dead-end or unsatisfactory jobs because they are afraid of losing company-provided health benefits.
The workers’ compensation premium for a Canadian autoworker in London, Ontario, is 4.56 percent of his or her wages; for an American autoworker in Minneapolis, it is 9.07 percent, according to the KPMG comparative report.
And as American health care costs outpace economic growth and the country’s population ages, a dose of Canadian medicine may cure what ails it.
www.worldpolicy.org /globalrights/econrights/canada-health.html   (832 words)

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