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Topic: Cantonese (linguistics)


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  Cantonese (linguistics)
Cantonese is one of the major dialects of the Chinese language.
Cantonese is spoken by about 70 million people worldwide, less than for example Mandarin Chinese, but still a major language.
Cantonese -- which in Cantonese is pronounced gwongdungwah, or more formally, yuet yue (the Yuet language, yuet being a formal word for the region now known as Guangdong and Guangxi) -- is a language of seven tones spoken largely in Guangdong's cities (including Hong Kong and Macau), and in most Chinatowns around the world.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/c/ca/cantonese__linguistics_.html   (1181 words)

  
 Qwika - Cantonese (linguistics)
Standard Mandarin is mandatory through the state education system, but in Cantonese speaking households, the popularization of Cantonese-language media (Hong Kong films, television serials, and Cantopop, most notably), isolation from the other regions of China, local identity, and the healthy economy of the Cantonese diaspora ensure that the language has a life of its own.
Cantonese is generally considered to have 6 or 7 tones, the choice depending on whether a traditional distinction between a high-level and a high-falling tone is observed; the two tones in question have largely merged into a single, high-level tone, especially in Hong Kong Cantonese.
Colloquial Cantonese is rarely used in formal forms of writing; formal written communication is almost always in standardized Mandarin or hanyu, albeit still pronounced in Cantonese.
wikipedia.qwika.com /wiki/Cantonese_Pinyin   (2457 words)

  
 Cantonese
The origins of Cantonese are not known due to absence of reliable historical records, however, it is generally agreed that it had acquired linguistics traits distinguishing it from other Chinese dialects by the time of the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD).
Cantonese is considered to be a conservative dialect because its sound system has preserved the final consonants and tones of the Tang Dynasty literary standard.
Cantonese is considered to be a Category III language in terms of difficulty for speakers of English.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/may/Cantonese.html   (1137 words)

  
 Cantonese - TheBestLinks.com - Cantonese cuisine, Dialect, Guangzhou, Japanese language, ...
Cantonese, Cantonese cuisine, Canton, Dialect, Guangzhou, Japanese language...
The term "Cantonese" clearly derives its origin from "Canton", the old name given by Westerners to Guangzhou, the capital of Guangdong Province.
Most likely, it is a metonymic corruption of the Cantonese pronunciation Gwong Dung, the name of the province, which used to be romanized as Kwang Tung.
www.thebestlinks.com /Cantonese.html   (227 words)

  
  Standard Cantonese at AllExperts
Traditionally, Cantonese was the lingua franca of overseas Chinese communities in the Western world, although that situation has changed with the increasing importance of Mandarin in the Chinese-speaking world as well as immigration from other provinces.
One shift that affected Cantonese in the past was the loss of distinction between the alveolar and the alveolo-palatal (sometimes pronounced as postalveolar) sibilants, which occurred during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Regional/local dialects (including Cantonese) in mainland China and Taiwan tend to be used primarily between relatives and friends in informal situations, with Standard Mandarin being used for formal purposes, in the media, and as the language of education.
en.allexperts.com /e/s/st/standard_cantonese.htm   (2834 words)

  
  Cantonese - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Cantonese language/dialect, broadly, is the speech originally developed among populations of Guangdong and environs.
Standard Cantonese is the prestige and mainstream (sub)dialect of Cantonese, historically based on that of Guangzhou, also usually simply called Cantonese.
Cantonese cuisine: cuisine of the style historically popularized in Guangzhou, or broadly, among Chinese communities abroad with origins in Guangdong.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cantonese   (392 words)

  
 Cantonese (linguistics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cantonese is generally considered to have 6 or 7 tones, the choice depending on whether a traditional distinction between a high-level and a high-falling tone is observed; the two tones in question have largely merged into a single, high-level tone, especially in Hong Kong Cantonese.
Colloquial Cantonese is rarely used in formal forms of writing; formal written communication is almost always in standardized Mandarin or hanyu, albeit still pronounced in Cantonese.
However, written colloquial Cantonese does exist; it is used mostly for transcription of speech in tabloids, in some broadsheets, for some subtitles, for personal diary, and in other informal forms of communication such as BBS on internet or e-mails.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cantonese_(linguistics)   (2622 words)

  
 Cantonese (linguistics)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cantonese is generally considered to have 6 or 7 tones, the choice depending on whether a traditional distinction between a high-level and a high-falling tone is observed; the two tones in question have largely merged into a single, high-level tone, especially in Hong Kong Cantonese.
Colloquial Cantonese is rarely used in formal forms of writing; formal written communication is almost always in standardized Mandarin or hanyu, albeit still pronounced in Cantonese.
At least this is the case in Hong Kong, but in the Canton area of mainland China, Cantonese is written with the exact same characters as Mandarin, though the characters stand for words not actually used in Cantonese.
www.guideofpills.com /Cantonese_%28linguistics%29.html   (2277 words)

  
 Cantonese_language information. LANGUAGE SCHOOL EXPLORER
Cantonese is a major dialect group or language of the Chinese language, a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages.
Cantonese is spoken by 71 million[3] people, mainly in Guangdong and some parts of Guangxi in southern Mainland China; in Hong Kong and Macau; by Chinese minorities in Southeast Asia and by many overseas Chinese of Guangdong and Hong Kong origin worldwide.
Colloquial Cantonese is rarely used in formal forms of writing; formal written communication is almost always in standardized Mandarin or hanyu, albeit still pronounced in Cantonese by Cantonese speakers who do not speak Mandarin.
www.school-explorer.com /Cantonese   (3182 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Cantonese language   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cantonese is one of the major dialects of the Chinese language.
Cantonese -- which in Cantonese is pronounced gwongdungwah, or more formally, yuet yue (the Yuet language, yuet being a formal word for the region now known as Guangdong and Guangxi) -- is a language of seven tones spoken largely in Guangdong's cities (including Hong Kong and Macau), and in most Chinatowns around the world.
Despite the popularity of Cantonese, most universities in the US do not and have not historically taught Cantonese, but hanyu, language of the Han ethnic majority, which is shared by both regimes in Beijing and Taipei as the official language of the Chinese people.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Cantonese   (1210 words)

  
 Cantonese/Hakka linguistics
Historical linguistics of Cantonese also shows that the Cantonese accent spoken in Canton and Hong Kong is relatively new.
Cantonese should have been more similar to Hakka by the beginning of the Qing Dynasty, but because of language contact with foreigners and other minoriity races, it is diverging away.
If Cantonese and Hakka were just Tangren coming to the South at about the same time, then their similarity in language can be well interpreted.
www.asiawind.com /pub/forum/fhakka/mhonarc/msg00513.html   (832 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: Cantonese as Written Language: The Growth of a Written Chinese Vernacular: Don Snow: Books
Cantonese is the only dialect of Chinese which has developed a widely known and used written form.
Cantonese as Written Language examines this development in the broader context of diglossia, and also of the patterns by which spoken vernaculars have developed written forms in other societies.
Cantonese does not get a lot of attention, unlike Mandarin, which is of course understandable, even though 70-100 million people speak Cantonese!...but "Chinese" is a fascinating language group,and this is a welcome book on one of the other Chinese dialects.
www.amazon.co.uk /Cantonese-Written-Language-Chinese-Vernacular/dp/962209709X   (568 words)

  
 UC Davis: Linguistics : Past Colloquia: 2003-2007
Since Cantonese is a ʻdialect,ʻ it is often associated with less positive linguistic attitudes even by its own speakers.
Nonetheless, some linguists have asserted that there are indeed clitic phenomena where the relationship between the clitic and its host bears the hallmarks of a lexical process.
Isolda E. Carranza (Ph.D., Linguistics, Georgetown University) is the author of Two-Way Immersion Education (1997) and co-author of Conversacion y deixis de discurso (1998).
linguistics.ucdavis.edu /past-colloquia   (7495 words)

  
 Cantonese (linguistics) - guideofcasinos.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Like other major varieties of Chinese, Cantonese is often considered a dialect of a single Chinese Language for cultural or nationalistic reasons; most linguists consider Cantonese a separate language in the sense that they use the term, with notable exceptions in the People's Republic (see Is Chinese a language or a family of languages?
To Cantonese speakers, their own language is more expressive, and is better received among speakers of Cantonese.
As not all Cantonese words can be found in current encoding system, or the users simply don't know how to enter such characters on the computer, in very informal speech, Cantonese tends to use extremely simple romanization (e.g.
www.guideofcasinos.com /Cantonese_%28linguistics%29.html   (2158 words)

  
 Cantonese (linguistics) at AllExperts
Cantonese is generally considered to have 6 or 7 tones, the choice depending on whether a traditional distinction between a high-level and a high-falling tone is observed; the two tones in question have largely merged into a single, high-level tone, especially in Hong Kong Cantonese.
Sun Yat-sen (also a Cantonese) considered the difficulty faced should Cantonese be universalized, therefore he persuaded MPs to vote in favour of mandarin as the official language.
Finally Cantonese was lost by 1 vote (somebody suggested that it was 3), Mandarin became the official language of China.
en.allexperts.com /e/c/ca/cantonese_(linguistics).htm   (3045 words)

  
 Cantonese (linguistics) Info - Encyclopedia WikiWhat.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Despite the popularity of Cantonese, most universities in the US do not and have not historically taught Cantonese, but Mandarin, which is used officially by both the People's Republic of China and Republic of China, and formerly in Imperial China as the court dialect.
The current one advocated by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) is called jyutping, which solves many of the inconsistencies and problems of the older, favored, and more familiar system of Yale romanization, but departs considerably from it in a number of ways unfamiliar to Yale users.
At least this is the case in Hong Kong, but in mainland China, Cantonese is written with the exact same characters as Mandarin, though the characters stand for words not actually used in Cantonese.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/c/ca/cantonese__linguistics_.html   (1101 words)

  
 Cantonese (linguistics)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
They are written using very similar characters but in Mandarin their pronunciation is different ("wǒ" vs. "è") whereas in Cantonese are pronounced identically except for the respective (ngo5 vs ngo6 respectively).
Despite the popularity of Cantonese most universities the US do not and have not taught Cantonese but Mandarin which is used by both the People's Republic of China and Republic of China and formerly in Imperial China as the court dialect.
Colloquial Cantonese is rarely used in formal of writing; almost always formal written communication conducted in standardized hanyu albeit still pronounced in Cantonese.
www.freeglossary.com /Cantonese_Language   (1159 words)

  
 Cantonese (linguistics)
Cantonese or Yue (粵語) is a major dialect group or language of the Chinese language, a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages.
Cantonese "taam6" (譚) and "taan4" (壇) versus Mandarin tán, "yim4" (é¹½) and "yin4" (言) versus Mandarin yán, "tim1" (æ·») and "tin1" (天) versus Mandarin tiān, "hum4" (含) and "hon4" (寒) versus Mandarin hán.
An example of Cantonese using a different word and a different character to write it: the Mandarin word for "to be" is shì and is written as 是, but in Cantonese the word for "to be" is hai6 and 係 is used in written Cantonese (係 is xì in Mandarin).
www.radiofreeithaca.net /search/Cantonese_(linguistics)   (3511 words)

  
 supernaut ... i whore for art … puk gai and other cantonese words of love
Cantonese, a sharp, cackling dialect full of slang and exaggerated expressions, was never the dominant language of China.
Cantonese is said to be closer than Mandarin to ancient Chinese.
But many Cantonese speakers are finding out now that they have to learn Mandarin or risk being left behind in business or even within their families.
www.supernaut.info /2006/01/puk_gai_and_other_cantonese_wo.html   (2214 words)

  
 The Department of Linguistics: Degrees: Introduction
Other non-majors who wish to take Linguistics courses in their second and third years' studies will also be expected to have passed the first year course.
A variety of research projects are under way in the department, encompassing the fields of phonetics, speech recognition, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicology and lexicography, language typology, language and literacy, sociolinguistics and conversation analysis, corpus linguistics, child language acquisition, pyscholinguistics, language and the human brain.
A strong tradition of research in Cantonese linguistics continues with new tools such as corpus linguistics and language processing being brought to bear on the field.
www.hku.hk /linguist/pro   (556 words)

  
 CONTENTS
Readers interested in the linguistic history of Hong Kong, particularly in its education system, are referred to the Bickley and Sweeting publications for their extensive archival references.
Linguistic descriptions and analyses of Cantonese are excluded on the same basis as are those on the English language - a lack of social and educational relevance, and the fact that the literature is overwhelming.
Lin, L-H. (1964) A linguistic profile of the Chinese population in Hong Kong - a survey of Chinese dialects spoken in Hong Kong: Cantonese, Chaozhou, Amoy, Hakka, Szeyap, Shanghai and Mandarin.
ec.hku.hk /njbruce/LANGBIBF.htm   (13826 words)

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