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Topic: Caracalla


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  Caracalla - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Caracalla (April 4, 186–April 8, 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from AD Born in Lugdunum in the province of Gaul in 186, he was the son of the future emperor Septimius Severus and Julia Domna.
Caracalla responded to this insult savagely in 215 by slaughtering the deputation of leading citizens who had unsuspectingly assembled before the city to greet his arrival, then unleashed his troops for several days of looting and plunder of Alexandria.
On the reverse, Circus Maximus, with the obelisk and the spinae, restored by the emperor.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Caracalla   (490 words)

  
 Roman Emperors - DIR Caracalla
Caracalla was born 4 April 188 in Lyon, where his father was serving as governor of the province of Gallia Lugdunensis under the emperor Commodus.
Caracalla was involved in directing the army's campaigns, while Geta was given civilian authority and a promotion to joint emperor with his father and brother.
Caracalla was being advised to have Geta murdered, and after at least one unsuccessful attempt, Geta was killed in late December 211.
www.roman-emperors.org /caracala.htm   (1252 words)

  
 Caracalla
Caracalla was born on 4 April AD 188 in Lugdunum (Lyons), being named Lucius Septimius Bassianus.
The nickname Caracalla was given to him, as he tended to wear a long Gallic cloak of that name.
Caracalla was 23, Geta 22, when their father died.
www.roman-empire.net /decline/caracalla.html   (1754 words)

  
 Caracalla Biography / Biography of Caracalla Biography Biography
Caracalla (188-217) was a Roman emperor whose reign was characterized by cruelty in his private life and irresponsibility in his public life.
Caracalla thereupon made a trip to Alexandria, where, in his resentment at the citizens' traditional liberty of speech, he assembled the city's youth and had them massacred by the army.
Caracalla is best known for the baths he built in Rome, which carry his name, and for an edict in 212/213 which granted full Roman citizenship to nearly all the free inhabitants of the empire, thus fulfilling centuries of legal progress.
www.bookrags.com /biography-caracalla   (545 words)

  
 CARACALLA - LoveToKnow Article on CARACALLA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In order to secure the sole authority, Caracalla barbarously murdered his brother in his mothers arms, and at the same time put to death some 20,000 persons, who were suspected of favoring him, amongst them the jurist Papinianus.
An important act of his reign (212) was the bestowal of the rights of Roman citizenship upon all free inhabitants of the empire, although the main object of Caracalla was doubtless to increase the amount of revenue derived from the tax on inheritances or legacies to which only Roman citizens were liable.
Amongst the numerous buildings with which Caracalla adorned the city, the most famous are the thermae, and the triumphal arch of Septimius Severus in the forum.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /C/CA/CARACALLA.htm   (449 words)

  
 Caracalla   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Caracalla (April 4, 186 - 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from 211-217 AD.
Born in Lyons in the province of Gaul in 176, he was the son of the future emperor Septimius Severus.
Caracalla had effectively become a military dictator, and was consequently very unpopular.
www.city-search.org /ca/caracalla.html   (471 words)

  
 Caracalla - Portrait Gallery of Roman Emperors on Coins
Caracalla was born at Lugdunum, now Lyons, in AD 188 to Septimius Severus and Julia Domna.
Caracalla became an object of universal hatred and contempt.
Caracalla introduced a new coin denomination, the antoninianus, which was named after him.
www.24carat.co.uk /caracalla.html   (663 words)

  
 Spartianus: "Life of Caracalla"
Immediately after Severus' death in Britain on 4 Feb., 211, Caracalla and Geta patched up a peace with the rebels and returned to Rome, where they arrived in May. The period of their joint rule, extending from their arrival to the murder of Geta about 26 Feb., 212, is omitted by the biographer.
Caracalla planned to kill him but refrained because he was very ill. -- DM Here he saw Geta's mother and some other women weeping for his brother's death, and he thereupon resolved to kill them; but he was deterred by thinking how this would merely add to the cruelty of having slain his brother.
The fabrication of an incestuous relationship between Caracalla and Julia Domna, and the equally false statement that Julia was the Emperor's stepmother, appear together in a definite historical tradition.
members.aol.com /heliogabby/bio/caracall.htm   (3653 words)

  
 Caracalla Paper
Since Caracalla was in a direct line to the descent of the throne, the statue was constructed to win the public’s respect and admiration, the same respect and admiration that they felt for Alexander the Great.
Behind Caracalla’s left leg, is the head of a horse that is suppose to represent Helios’ chariot that he rode across the sky.
In Emperor Caracalla in the Guise of Helios the statue has a light value because it is light gray in color and while Caracalla is dark in value because not much light is reflected from the statue’s surface.
www.unc.edu /~sfox/caracalla.html   (1394 words)

  
 Roman Emperors - DIR Geta
As Caracalla was increasingly being treated as the "heir," Geta was being treated as the "spare." Geta was given the title Caesar and publicly promoted as part of a close-knit, imperial family.
Caracalla might well have been satisfied had Geta behaved like Verus, whose authority was more official than real and who deferred to his older sibling in political matters.
Caracalla said the murder came in response to his brother's plottings, and the death started a bloody and violent purge of Caracalla's suspected enemies.
www.roman-emperors.org /geta.htm   (768 words)

  
 Geta - Roman Emperor   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Caracalla was increasingly being treated as the successor, while Geta was being treated as the spare.
Caracalla might well have been satisfied with this situation had Geta behaved like Verus, whose authority was more official than real and who deferred to his older sibling in political matters.
Caracalla's critics looked back wistfully at the murdered prince, who came to be described as a lamb devoured by his ferocious, lion-like brother.
www.unrv.com /emperors/geta.php   (709 words)

  
 Caracalla - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Caracalla (April 4, 186–April 8, 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from AD 211–217.
Born in Lugdunum in the province of Gaul in 186, he was the son of the future emperor Septimius Severus and Julia Domna.
His given name was Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, but he adopted the name Caracalla, which referred to the hooded tunic worn by his fellow-countrymen.
www.butte-silverbow.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Caracalla   (525 words)

  
 Caracalla Biography
Caracalla (April 4, 186 - April 8, 217) was emperor of the Roman Empire from AD 211 - 217.
Caracalla killed Geta and carried out a vendetta against Geta's supporters, in order to strengthen his own hold on power.
It never states that Caracalla was killed in this battle but it does say that Caracalla fled from it.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Caracalla.html   (444 words)

  
 Caracalla and Geta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
He headed east, where the Parthians were in disarray due to a civil war between Vologases V and Artabanos V; Caracalla pretended to ally himself with Artabanos, going so far as to promise to marry his sister, but then turned around and attacked him when he was unprepared.
In Mesopotamia, Caracalla fell victim to a conspiracy that probably included his Praetorian Prefect, Macrinus, and definitely included at least one of the Imperial bodyguards.
The guard stuck a knife into Caracalla while he was relieving his bowels, then tried to escape on horseback; but another of Caracalla's guards nailed him with a javelin.
www.electriciti.com /garstang/emperors/carandgeta.htm   (758 words)

  
 Antoninus (Caracalla, A.D. 211-217)
Next he marched against Parthia; in early 216, Caracalla assembled a substantial force (at least eight legions) along the Syrian frontier, for what would prove to be his final triumph.
Caracalla leveraged this division by allying with Artabanus, even proposing marriage with Artabanus' daughter.
Caracalla no doubt would also have assumed the title Parthicus and celebrated a 4th acclamation of imperator had his life not been suddenly cut short on April 8, 217, when he was assassinated and replaced by his Praetorian commander, Marcus Opellius Macrinus, who continued these empty "victory" issues, despite severe military reverses.
www.parthia.com /rome_caracalla.htm   (686 words)

  
 Macrinus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Regardless, Caracalla's mom played on the soldiers' love for her son to make sure his reign was short and unpleasant.
He was the Praetorian commander at the time of the assassination; with Caracalla childless and not having named an heir, he was one of the obvious candidates.
When Macrinus learned that she was attempting (with some success) to undermine his support with the troops, he ordered her to leave Syria; instead, being already at the advanced stages of breast cancer, she chose to make a martyr of herself and starved herself to death.
www.electriciti.com /garstang/emperors/macrinus.htm   (417 words)

  
 Caracalla, Roman Imperial Coins of, at WildWinds.com
Caracalla AE 30 mm of Augusta Trajana, Thrace.
Caracalla, as Caesar, Æ 28mm of Bizya in Thrace.
Caracalla Æ 21mm of Caesarea Panias, Trachonitis, Syria.
www.wildwinds.com /coins/ric/caracalla/i.html   (8388 words)

  
 Caracalla on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
After Septimius Severus died, leaving the empire to his two sons, Caracalla murdered (212) the more popular Geta and ordered a general massacre of Geta's followers and sympathizers (including the jurist Papinian).
When leading an expedition in Asia, Caracalla was murdered by Macrinus, who succeeded him.
The famous Baths of Caracalla were erected in his reign.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/c/caracall.asp   (498 words)

  
 Caracalla   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Caracalla had Geta assasinated and carried out a vendetta against Geta's supporters, in order to strengthen his own hold on power.
When the inhabitants of Alexandria, EgyptAlexandria heard Caracalla's claims that he had killed Geta in self-defense, they produced a satire mocking this claim, as well as Caracalla's other pretensions.
Colin McEvedy was interested in mass movements of people, whether as a psychiatrist, historian, or demographer, but it was his analysis of a mystery illness at the Royal Free Hospital in London that made his name in psychiatry.
www.infothis.com /find/Caracalla   (465 words)

  
 ANS: The Rivalry of Caracalla and Geta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Caracalla and Geta were 23 and 22 respectively when their father died.
Caracalla, seemingly the more audacious of the two, finally achieved his goal of sole-rule by having his brother murdered in December of 211, perhaps by centurions who cut down Geta at their mother's apartment.
This victory was not by itself enough so that Caracalla further ordered that all images of his brother, including those on coins, be erased.
www.amnumsoc.org /exhibits/featured/getacaracalla.html   (268 words)

  
 Caracalla - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Born in Lyons in the province of Gaul in 186, he was the son of the future emperor Septimius Severus and Julia Domna.
This is partially true as Geta was established as emperor more strongly in the west and when he was killed, Caracalla probably exerted his power of the Britons as well.
The text goes on to say that a warrior named Carausius was given ships to defend the British coastline and instead he rose up and defeated Caracalla.
www.medicaliterature.com /Caracalla.wik   (458 words)

  
 Plautilla
Caracalla apparently hated her for her imperious and snobby ways and warned her that the only reason she was with him in the first place was in deference to his father's wishes.
Alarmed at what Caracalla might do to her, Plautianus then set up a hasty plot to kill his friend Severus but the plot was revealed and he was executed.
Shortly after Severus's death Caracalla made good on his threats and exiled her to an island.
www.dirtyoldcoins.com /natto/id/plautil.htm   (581 words)

  
 Bust of Emperor Caracalla (Getty Museum)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Caracalla, one of the bold and brutal Roman emperors who ruled in the early 200s A.D., murdered his brother in his ascent to power and later was himself assassinated.
In the 1700s, Caracalla's likeness was known from a bust in the Farnese collection in Rome and then Naples, believed to date from the 200s.
He demonstrated his familiarity with classicism through his skillful drillwork in the antique manner, seen in the handling of Caracalla's beard and hair.
www.getty.edu /art/collections/objects/o1472.html   (196 words)

  
 Caracalla
Within a year, Caracalla stabbed his brother to death in the presence of their mother.
Caracalla enjoyed being a soldier and he let his mother, Julia Domna rule in Rome.
Caracalla is famous for making the Baths of Caracalla in Rome.
www.sfusd.k12.ca.us /schwww/sch618/RomanLinks/caracalla.htm   (512 words)

  
 Caracalla   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Caracalla was the youngest son of the Emperor Severus and Julia Domna.
Caracalla put on a good show for Roman society and the government, by getting along with Geta through the taking of Severus' ashes back to Rome and their initial acceptance as Rome's leaders.
Once power was established, Geta was murdered by Caracalla and began his brief reign from 211-221.
www.vroma.org /~bcoates/carac.html   (76 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 1998.11.41
Originally, when DeLaine began to work on the Baths of Caracalla in 1981 for a doctoral dissertation at the University of Adelaide, she envisioned a study of large-scale construction in imperial Rome and of the Roman building industry.
Her second objective (Part III 8-9) is to place the Baths of Caracalla (and the act of large-scale imperial building in the heart of Rome) in a wider context.
As of the summer of 1997 the grand sculptures (Farnese collection) from the Baths of Caracalla which are in the Museo Archeologico Nazionale of Naples, had been newly cleaned and arranged with splendid descriptions and up-to-date discussion of their placement in their original settings.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/1998/1998-11-41.html   (2734 words)

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