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Topic: Carbon monoxide


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  Carbon Monoxide | Basic Information | Indoor Air Quality | Air | US EPA
Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas.
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, practically odorless, and tasteless gas or liquid.
Discusses carbon monoxide (CO) hazards; and prevention and detection of dangerous CO levels.
www.epa.gov /iaq/co.html   (1550 words)

  
  Carbon monoxide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Carbon monoxide from automobile and industrial emissions is a dangerous pollutant that may contribute to the greenhouse effect and global warming.
Carbon monoxide is dangerous and life-threatening to humans and other forms of air-breathing life, as inhaling even relatively small amounts of it can lead to hypoxic injury, neurological damage, and possibly death.
Carbon monoxide and methanol react in the presence of a homogeneous rhodium catalyst and HI to give acetic acid in the Monsanto process, which is responsible for most of the industrial production of acetic acid.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Carbon_monoxide   (1483 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide - ninemsn Encarta
Carbon Monoxide, chemical compound of carbon and oxygen with the formula CO. It is a colourless, odourless gas, about 3 per cent lighter than air, and is poisonous to all warm-blooded animals and to many other forms of life.
Carbon monoxide is a major ingredient of the air pollution in urban areas.
In smelting iron ore carbon monoxide formed from coke used in the process acts as a reducing agent, that is, it removes oxygen from the ore. Carbon monoxide combines actively with chlorine to form carbonyl chloride, or phosgene, and it combines with hydrogen, when heated in the presence of a catalyst, to form methyl alcohol.
au.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761551907/Carbon_Monoxide.html   (400 words)

  
 Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Carbon monoxide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carbon monoxide was first prepared by the French chemist de Lassone in 1776 by heating zinc oxide with coke but thought it to be hydrogen by mistake as it burned with a blue flame.
In this case carbon monoxide is regarded as a the carbonyl ligand.
Carbon monoxide and methanol are reacted together using a homogenous rhodium catalyst to form acetic acid in the Monsanto process, which is responsible for most of the industrial production of acetic acid.
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Carbon_monoxide   (785 words)

  
 Carbon monoxide poisoning - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of combustion of organic matter under conditions of restricted oxygen supply, which prevents complete oxidation to carbon dioxide.
Carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common type of fatal poisoning in France and the United States.
Carbon monoxide binds to hemoglobin (reducing oxygen transportation), myoglobin (decreasing its oxygen carrying capacity), and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (inhibiting cellular respiration).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning   (2459 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Encyclopedia of Children's Health
Carbon monoxide, sometimes called coal gas, has been known as a toxic substance since the third century B.C. It was used for executions and suicides in early Rome.
Carbon monoxide is the leading cause of accidental poisoning in the United States.
The speed and degree of recovery from CO poisoning depends on the length of exposure to the gas and the concentration of carbon monoxide.
health.enotes.com /childrens-health-encyclopedia/carbon-monoxide-poisoning   (1733 words)

  
 Postgraduate Medicine: Carbon monoxide poisoning
The body produces carbon monoxide as a by-product of hemoglobin degradation, but the gas does not reach toxic concentrations unless it is inhaled from exogenous sources, such as the incomplete combustion of any carbonaceous fossil fuel.
The acute symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are reflected in the susceptibility of the brain and heart to hypoxia (table 1: not shown).
Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas that causes vague flulike symptoms which are often misinterpreted by both patients and physicians.
www.postgradmed.com /issues/1999/01_99/tomaszewski.htm   (3359 words)

  
 carbon monoxide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Because carbon monoxide is attracted to the hemoglobin about 210 times as strongly as is oxygen, it takes the place of oxygen in the blood, causing oxygen starvation throughout the body.
Carbon Monoxide, chemical compound of carbon and oxygen with the formula CO. It is a colorless, odorless gas, about 3 percent lighter than air, and is poisonous to all warm-blooded animals and to many other forms of life.
Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless and toxic gas produced as a by-product of combustion.
www.carbonmonoxidekills.org.uk /carbonmonoxidepoisoningdetector.htm   (4608 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Deaths, Injuries and Legal Resources
Carbon monoxide is a colorless and odorless gas given off during the burning of fuel.
The jury agreed that the cause of Nelson's death was carbon monoxide poisoning, caused by a defect with the truck.
Carbon monoxide is an invisible gas with no odor or taste that results from an incomplete combustion of natural gas and other materials containing carbon such as gasoline, kerosene, oil, propane, coal or wood.
www.carbon-monoxide-poisoning-injury.com /news-2004.htm   (4484 words)

  
 Carbon monoxide - EPA/QPWS
Emissions of carbon monoxide from motor vehicle usage in south-east Queensland has been estimated at 328,700 tonnes, or 83 percent of the total estimated carbon monoxide emissions for the region (South East Queensland Regional Air Quality Strategy, 1999).
When inhaled, the carbon monoxide bonds to the haemoglobin in the blood (and becomes carboxyhaemoglobin) in place of oxygen and is carried through the blood stream.
Although ambient carbon monoxide levels in urban residential areas are unlikely to cause significant health effects, indoor sources such as poorly ventilated gas appliances and wood heaters could pose a risk to human health.
www.epa.qld.gov.au /environmental_management/air/air_quality_monitoring/air_pollutants/carbon_monoxide   (445 words)

  
 Why is Carbon Monoxide so Poisonous?
Carbon monoxide (chemical formula CO) is a colorless, odorless, flammable and highly toxic gas.
Carbon monoxide binds very strongly to the iron atoms in hemoglobin, the principal oxygen-carrying compound in blood.
Carbon monoxide also binds coordinately to heme iron atoms in a manner similar to that of oxygen, but the binding of carbon monoxide to heme is much stronger than that of oxygen.
www.edinformatics.com /interactive_molecules/carbon_monoxide.htm   (417 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide Encyclopedia Article @ LaunchBase.org (Launch Base)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
According to officials, Lee was overcome by carbon monoxide poisoning.
Officials said that Lee was overcome by carbon monoxide poisoning.
Many other metals may form complexes containing covalently attached carbon monoxide, although many are not made directly from CO. For this reason, pure nickel tubing and parts must not come into prolonged contact with carbon monoxide (corrosion).
www.launchbase.org /encyclopedia/Carbon_monoxide   (1517 words)

  
 cohazard.html
Because the symptoms of prolonged, low-level carbon monoxide poisoning mimic the symptoms of common winter ailments (headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, even seasonal depression), many cases are not detected until permanent, subtle damage to the brain, heart and other organs and tissues has occurred.
The symptoms of low-level carbon monoxide poisoning are so easily mistaken for those of the common cold, flu or exhaustion that proper diagnosis can be delayed.
Carbon monoxide detectors are now readily available and no home should be without at least two, one near the furnace and one near the sleeping area of the home.
www.csia.org /homeowners/cohazard.htm   (1274 words)

  
 What you need to know about carbon monoxide
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless deadly gas.
Carbon monoxide is a by-product of combustion, present whenever fuel is burned.
Note: Because carbon monoxide accumulates in some detectors over time, as it does in the bloodstream, the source of CO may be appliances that were running before the alarm sounded.
www.extension.iastate.edu /Pages/communications/CO/co1.html   (1617 words)

  
 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH GUIDELINE FOR CARBON MONOXIDE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Effects on Animals: Carbon monoxide is an asphyxiant that exerts its toxic effects by combining with the hemoglobin of the blood, which decreases the amount of oxygen delivered to the tissues.
Carbon monoxide can be transported across the placental barrier, and exposure in utero constitutes a special risk to the fetus.
Carbon monoxide is not subject to EPA emergency planning requirements under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) (III) in USC 11022.
www.osha-slc.gov /SLTC/healthguidelines/carbonmonoxide/recognition.html   (3140 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide - NSC
Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that interferes with the delivery of oxygen in the blood to the rest of the body.
Carbon monoxide is produced as a result of incomplete burning of carbon-containing fuels including coal, wood, charcoal, natural gas, and fuel oil.
Carbon monoxide interferes with the distribution of oxygen in the blood to the rest of the body.
www.nsc.org /library/facts/carbmono.htm   (597 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carbon Monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, yet poisonous gas, resulting from incomplete fuel combustion.
Carbon Monoxide levels in Maricopa County are higher in the wintertime due to temperature inversions and the Valley's topography.
Carbon monoxide enters the bloodstream and reduces oxygen delivery to the body's organs and tissues.
www.cityofmesa.org /environ/Carbonmonoxide.asp   (270 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide Detector - carbon monoxide detectors, carbon monoxide smoke alarm, poisioning, smoke alarm detector   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carbon Monoxide Detectors are devices that detect the levels of carbon monoxide in a house or building, and alert you when the levels are too high.
A carbon monoxide detector is a device to alert the user that CO (carbon monoxide) is present at a predetermined level.
Carbon monoxide detectors are not truly designed to protect all of the public even though they meet state requirements: 70 ppm is a joke and testing to see if the buzzer works gives a false sense of security.
www.homeservicesguideonline.com /Carbon_Monoxide_Detector.html   (2569 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Injury: 2007 Lawsuits Update and Legal Resources
Carbon monoxide is a colorless and odorless gas given off during the burning of fuel.
Persons who have suffered carbon monoxide poisoning due to a faulty or defective product, such as a furnace, portable generator or gas heater, are welcome to contact a personal injury attorney at Lieff Cabraser by clicking here.
Carbon monoxide is a colorless and odorless gas that is produced by burning fuel, such as gasoline, wood, paper, natural gas, or kerosene.
www.carbon-monoxide-poisoning-injury.com   (847 words)

  
 Organic Chemistry at Penn State: Carbon Monoxide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carbon monoxide is a simple diatomic molecule that illustrates how two different atoms interact to form molecular orbitals (MO).
The molecular orbitals (MO) of carbon monoxide are formed by "mixing" of atomic orbitals (forming linear combinations of them, or in simplistic terms adding them to each other or subtracting them from each other).
The CO molecule has 10 valence electrons (4 from carbon, 6 from oxygen), filling the five lowest-in-energy orbitals (see the piture above; if you place the cursor above the orbital for one second you get some info on its nature and number of electrons in it).
courses.chem.psu.edu /chem38/mol-gallery/co/co.html   (970 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide Detectors Can Save Lives   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that is produced when any fuel is incompletely burned.
Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are similar to flu-like illnesses and include dizziness, fatigue, headaches, nausea, and irregular breathing.
Carbon monoxide can leak from faulty furnaces or fuel-fired heaters or can be trapped inside by a blocked chimney or flue.
www.cpsc.gov /cpscpub/pubs/5010.html   (311 words)

  
 PFD: CARBON MONOXIDE
Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless, deadly gas.
Carbon monoxide is a by-product of combustion of fossil fuels.
Measure the concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases.
www.ci.phoenix.az.us /FIRE/carbon.html   (604 words)

  
 Questions and Answers About Carbon Monoxide Detectors
Carbon monoxide detectors should not be placed within five feet of gas fueled appliances, or near cooking or bathing areas.
Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless and toxic gas produced as a by-product of combustion.
Carbon monoxide inhibits the blood's ability to carry oxygen to body tissues including vital organs such as the heart and brain.
www.aboutcarbonmonoxide.com /articles/volunteerfd.htm   (2193 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide
Carbon monoxide is a potentially serious hazard that must be addressed to ensure healthy housing.
Carbon monoxide poisoning can be fatal, and low levels of carbon monoxide can cause flu-like symptoms, headaches, dizziness, and make it difficult to think clearly.
Although the presence of a carbon monoxide detector can help identify problems, they should not be used in place of preventive efforts, nor should their silence be interpreted as unquestionable proof of the absence of carbon monoxide hazards.
www.afhh.org /dah/dah_carbon_monoxide.htm   (468 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carbon monoxide is one of two oxides of carbon, the other being carbon dioxide.
Carbon monoxide, CO, is prepared in the laboratory either
Carbon monoxide is an important industrial gas, which is widely used as a fuel.
www.ucc.ie /ucc/depts/chem/dolchem/html/comp/co.html   (188 words)

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