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Topic: Carcinoma in situ


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In the News (Mon 19 Aug 19)

  
  Carcinoma in situ definition - Cancer information on MedicineNet.com
Carcinoma in situ: Cancer that involves only the place in which it began and that has not spread.
For example, squamous cell carcinoma in situ (Bowen's disease) is an early cancer of the skin.
The term "in situ" (borrowed from the Romans) means "in the natural or normal place" and, in the case of cancer, it means that the tumor cells are still confined to the site where they originated and they have neither invaded neighboring tissues nor metastasized afar.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2627   (199 words)

  
  Discovery Health :: Diseases & Conditions :: carcinoma in situ
Carcinoma in situ of the breast may be found when a small change is noted on a mammogram.
Carcinoma in situ of the bladder may be found when the internal wall of the bladder is examined for other reasons.
Carcinoma in situ is diagnosed by taking a sample, called a biopsy, of the area.
health.discovery.com /encyclopedias/illnesses.html?article=2509   (463 words)

  
 Dr. Koop - Lobular Carcinoma In Situ- Health Encyclopedia and Reference
Noninvasive breast cancer, or carcinoma in situ, is defined as breast carcinoma limited to the ducts (ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS) or lobules (lobular carcinoma in situ, or LCIS) with no extension beyond the basement membrane into the surrounding tissue.
Ductal carcinoma in situ is the most common form of non-invasive carcinoma (making up 3 to 4 percent of symptomatic and 17 percent of screen detected cancers) and is characterized by ducts and ductules expanded by large irregular cells with large irregular nuclei.
In contrast, lobular carcinoma in situ is rare (0.5 percent of symptomatic and 1 percent of screen detected cancers) and shows as an expansion of the whole lobule by small regular cells with regular, round, or oval nuclei.
www.drkoop.com /encyclopedia/43/455.html   (861 words)

  
 Treatment Recurrence of Cervical Cancer
Frederick R. Jelovsek MD "I was recently diagnosed with carcinoma in situ or severe dysplasia of the cervix, I had a LEEP procedure and recently had a normal pap test.
In truth, pathologists cannot always differentiate between about 70% and 100% of the thickness so that severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ are often lumped together to bring attention to the seriousness of the lesion.
Rates of progression of carcinoma in situ of the cervix to frankly invasive cancer range from about 22% to 60% when followed more than 10 years (3, 4).
www.wdxcyber.com /ncanc11.htm   (926 words)

  
 Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS)
The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of basal-like ductal carcinoma in situ in a population-based series of cases using immunohistochemical surrogates.
The solid papillary variant of ductal carcinoma in situ is an uncommon entity, which usually presents in the seventh or eighth decade and may be associated with invasive mucinous carcinoma.
Residual infiltrating ductal carcinoma was present in 35% of cases, and residual ductal carcinoma in situ was present in 50%.
www.thedoctorsdoctor.com /diseases/dcis.htm   (12698 words)

  
 Carcinoma in Situ; Baltimore, Maryland MD   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-25)
The diagnosis of breast cancer in situ implies that the biopsy shows a non-invasive or pre-malignant condition that is not truly an invasive cancer.
Breast cancer in situ is classified as either ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), arising from ductal epithelium or lobular cancer in situ (LCIS), arising from the epithelium of the lobules.
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is the earliest possible clinical diagnosis of breast cancer and is frequently diagnosed with screening mammography that has detected small areas of calcification in the breast.
www.harborhospital.org /16111.cfm   (1594 words)

  
 Ductal Carcinoma, Lobular Carcinoma, Phyllodes Tumor & Types of Breast Cancer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-25)
In ductal carcinoma in situ, cancer cells are present inside the milk ducts but they have not yet spread through the walls of the ducts into the fatty tissue of the breast.
Lobular carcinoma in situ does not penetrate through the wall of the lobules, and most researchers believe it does not usually become an invasive breast cancer.
However, women who develop lobular carcinoma in situ have a higher future risk of developing invasive breast cancer in the same or opposite breast.
www.breastbiopsy.com /bioresults_typesofbreastcancer2.jsp   (960 words)

  
 Prevalence of carcinoma in situ of the testis in 207 oligozoospermic men from infertile couples: prospective study of ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-25)
The observed prevalence of carcinoma in situ was compared with the expected prevalence of testicular cancer in a corresponding age matched population of Danish men, assuming all untreated cases of carcinoma in situ progress to tumour stage.
To estimate the relative risk of carcinoma in situ in the population studied an expected number of cases of testicular cancer was calculated for a corresponding normal population adjusted for age at the time of biopsy and year of birth.
Firstly, testicular biopsy was assumed to be 100% sensitive in the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ.
www.mindfully.org /Health/Testis-Carcinoma-In-Situ.htm   (1693 words)

  
 ACS :: What Is Breast Cancer?
In situ: This term is used for the early stage of cancer, when it is confined to the immediate area where it began.
Specifically in breast cancer, in situ means that the cancer remains confined to ducts (ductal carcinoma in situ) or lobules (lobular carcinoma in situ).
Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS): Although not a true cancer, LCIS (also called lobular neoplasia) is sometimes classified as a type of noninvasive breast cancer, and this is why it is included here.
www.cancer.org /docroot/CRI/content/CRI_2_4_1X_What_is_breast_cancer_5.asp?sitearea=   (1936 words)

  
 16. What is carcinoma in situ?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-25)
Carcinoma in situ in other parts of the body, such as the prostate, cervix, or testicle, is thought to be a premalignantcondition, but in the bladder it is always malignant.
Carcinoma in situ itself is a flat (not papillary) lesion, and thus it can be more difficult to identify during a cystoscopy.
Carcinoma in situ tends to shed cells into the urine, which can usually be detected on a urine sample by a test called urine cytology(see Question33 for more details).
www.cancersource.com /Search/39,QABla16   (212 words)

  
 eMedicine - Carcinoma In Situ of the Urinary Bladder : Article by Stanley A Brosman, MD
Synonyms and related keywords: carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder, CIS of the urinary bladder, flat carcinoma of the urothelium, transitional cell carcinoma, TCC, papillary tumors, cystectomy, bacillus Calmette-Guérin, BCG, gross hematuria, microscopic hematuria, irritative bladder symptoms, bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine, BCG vaccine, bladder CIS, CIS of the bladder, urinary CIS, urothelial CIS
The initial surgical procedure involved with carcinoma in situ (CIS) is transurethral biopsy of the bladder.
Orsola A, Palou J, Xavier B, et al: Primary bladder carcinoma in situ: assessment of early BCG response as a prognostic factor.
www.emedicine.com /med/topic3022.htm   (8021 words)

  
 NGC - NGC Summary
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; intraductal carcinoma) is pathologically defined by the presence of carcinoma cells in well-defined ductal structures without penetration of the duct wall as seen by conventional light microscopic evaluation.
Ductal carcinoma in situ can be subdivided many different ways from a clinical and pathologic perspective: palpable versus mammographic detection, architectural pattern (comedo, papillary, micropapillary, cribriform, and solid subtypes), presence or absence of comedo necrosis, nuclear grade, size, and margin status.
Microinvasive carcinoma (ductal carcinoma in situ with microinvasion) is pathologically defined by the presence of early penetration of the duct wall by cancer cells beyond the basement membrane as seen by conventional light microscopic evaluation, with no focus measuring more than 0.1 cm.
www.guideline.gov /summary/summary.aspx?doc_id=9610&nbr=5130&ss=6&xl=999   (4958 words)

  
 The Cancer Council Victoria - Lobular carcinoma in situ
Lobular carcinoma in situ and the risk of breast cancer
Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is an uncommon condition where benign (non-cancer) change is seen within the lobules of the breast.
Although the term 'carcinoma in situ' can arouse anxiety and thoughts of cancer, LCIS is considered a benign condition that does not usually require treatment.
www.cancervic.org.au /cancer1/prevent/breasthealth/lcis.htm   (467 words)

  
 Carcinoma in Situ of the Penis in a 76-Year-Old Circumcised Man
Significant past medical history included nonrecurrent bladder carcinoma, left hemicolectomy in 1964 for colon adenocarcinoma, excision of a rectal tubovillous adenoma in 1994, benign prostatic hypertrophy status post-transuretharl resection of prostate, prostatourethritis in 1965, and hepatitis A with jaundice in 1942.
In a Danish study, men with localized squamous cell carcinoma of the penis were 7.81 times as likely to have been circumcised after the newborn period as the general population.
Carcinoma in situ of the penis in a 76-year-old circumcised man. J Fam Pract 1997;44:407-10.
www.cirp.org /library/disease/penile-cancer/vanhowe   (1909 words)

  
 Vascular density and phenotype around ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast
Up to 50% of recurrences of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast are associated with invasive carcinoma but no pathological or molecular features have yet been found to predict for the development of invasive disease.
Previous studies have described a vascular rim around ducts involved by ductal carcinoma in situ, raising the possibility that the characteristics of periductal vascularisation may be important in determining transformation from in situ to invasive disease.
vessels around ductal carcinoma in situ associated with invasive carcinoma could reflect a greater predisposition to invade but a direct effect of co-existent invasive carcinoma cannot entirely be ruled out in the present study.
www.nature.com /bjc/journal/v86/n6/abs/6600053a.html   (375 words)

  
 Breast Cancer - CancerConsultants.com
The most common type of breast cancer is called ductal carcinoma and begins in the lining of the ducts.
Carcinoma In Situ: Approximately 15-20% of breast cancers are very early in their development.
These are sometimes referred to as carcinoma in situ and consist of two types: ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which originates in the ducts and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), which originates in the lobules.
patient.cancerconsultants.com /breast_cancer_treatment.aspx?id=654   (1467 words)

  
 Medical Dictionary: Carcinoma in situ - WrongDiagnosis.com
Carcinoma in situ: General medical term meaning cancer that is still in its original cells without spreading to other local cell types.
Carcinoma in situ: Cancer that involves only cells in the tissue in which it began and that has not spread to nearby tissues.
Carcinoma in situ: a cluster of malignant cells that has not yet invaded the deeper epithelial tissue or spread to other parts of the body
www.wrongdiagnosis.com /medical/carcinoma_in_situ.htm   (286 words)

  
 : Carcinoma In-situ
This is regarded as a precursor to invasive carcinoma, at least in many cases [8].
This represents a significant change from a previously held view that in-situ carcinoma required that the full thickness of the epithelium contain cytologically malignant cells.
The nuclei are dark-staining and they vary markedly in their size and shape and involve the full thickness of the epithelium.
www.afip.org /cgi-bin/edu/coursepage.pl?code=&id=17   (337 words)

  
 Healthopedia.com - Carcinoma in Situ
Carcinoma in situ describes a cancer in the very earliest stage.
Cancers found in situ are the easiest to cure because they have not spread.
The risks for developing a particular type of carcinoma in situ are the same as the risks for developing that type of cancer.
www.healthopedia.com /carcinoma-in-situ   (336 words)

  
 Ductal carcinoma in situ - NBCC
Such recommendations should take into account what is feasible in current practice and recognise that results obtained in controlled clinical trials may not always be realised in routine practice.
The recommendations contained in this document address the management of the following conditions: ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH).
The clinical management of ductal carcinoma in situ, lobular carcinoma in situ and atypical hyperplasia of the breast
www.nbcc.org.au /bestpractice/dcis   (418 words)

  
 Imaginis - Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)
The American Cancer Society estimates that 41,000 news cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (also called DCIS or intraductal carcinoma) will be diagnosed in 2000, making DCIS the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer in women.
An estimated 185,000 cases of invasive breast cancer are diagnosed each year, and approximately 20% to 30% of breast cancers detected by mammography are carcinoma in situ.
The term, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), refers to a family of cancers that occur in the breast ducts.
www.imaginis.com /breasthealth/dcis.asp   (999 words)

  
 The Cancer Council Victoria - Ductal carcinoma in situ
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a condition that can occur in several different forms.
These extra cells in the duct show some of the abnormalities of cancer cells, but they have not spread outside the duct (in situ means 'in place').
Ductal carcinoma in situ in New South Wales women in 1995 to 1997.
www.cancervic.org.au /cancer1/prevent/breasthealth/dcis.htm   (755 words)

  
 Carcinoma in situ
A tumor or group of cells that has the earmarks of carcinoma but is not yet malignant or cancerous, since it hasn't invaded the surrounding tissue.
In the case of intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, etc) the basement membrane under the squamous layer is still intact.
Anyone having questions about the application of information appearing here to a specific person or situation should obtain advice from a qualified physician.
www.baymoon.com /~hpvinfo/library/glossary/bldefinsitu.htm   (110 words)

  
 DCIS - Ductal Carcinoma In Situ
And it is sometimes called "pre-cancer." You may also hear it referred to as Tis, which means that the cancer is non-invasive.
The answer is yes, because DCIS is an uncontrolled growth of breast cells.
The "personality" of DCIS is judged by the cancer grade of dead cells in the tumor, pattern of growth, microinvasion, hormone-receptor status, and how the stage of the disease might change in certain situations.
www.breastcancer.org /dcis_ductal_carcinoma_in_situ.html   (1026 words)

  
 Imaginis - Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)
The American Cancer Society estimates that 41,000 news cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (also called DCIS or intraductal carcinoma) will be diagnosed in 2000, making DCIS the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer in women.
An estimated 185,000 cases of invasive breast cancer are diagnosed each year, and approximately 20% to 30% of breast cancers detected by mammography are carcinoma in situ.
The term, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), refers to a family of cancers that occur in the breast ducts.
imaginis.com /breasthealth/dcis.asp   (999 words)

  
 Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast
Ductal carcinoma in situ: a proposal for a new classification.
Cytological and architectural heterogeneity in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.
Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: reproducibility of histological subtype analysis.
www.moffitt.org /moffittapps/ccj/v6n3/article5.htm   (3977 words)

  
 Suburban Breast Center | Ductal Carcinoma In Situ   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-25)
Most ductal carcinomas in situ are found by mammography when microcalcifications are observed in a clustered pattern.
When a biopsy of the area confirms ductal carcinoma in situ, you have a pre-cancer that has potential to spread and threaten your life.
Very rarely has carcinoma in situ been found to have metastasized to the lymph nodes under the arms.
www.suburbanhospital.org /breastcenter/0304-Ductal-Carcinoma-I-S.html   (335 words)

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