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Topic: Cardiac pacemaker


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  FDA Heart Health Online - Cardiac Pacemaker (implanted)
A pacemaker is a small, battery-powered device that is implanted permanently into the body.
The pacemaker is connected to the heart through one to three insulated wires (leads) that are attached directly to the heart's chambers.
A pacemaker should not be implanted in people who cannot tolerate the device or the surgical procedure, or who are sensitive (allergic) to the exposed parts of the pacing system.
www.fda.gov /hearthealth/treatments/medicaldevices/cardiacpacemakerimplanted.html   (524 words)

  
  Pacemaker for bradycardia
A pacemaker is a battery-powered device about the size of a pocket watch that sends weak electrical impulses to “set a pace” so that the heart is able to maintain a regular heartbeat.
This type of pacemaker varies its rate to cause the heart to beat faster when you are exercising to meet your body's increased needs or slower when you are at rest.
Temporary pacemakers are worn outside the body and attached to the heart by a wire threaded through a neck vein or leg vein or through the chest wall.
www.webmd.com /heart-disease/Pacemaker-for-bradycardia   (690 words)

  
 USNews.com: Health: Cardiomyopathy: Cardiac Pacemaker Implantation
Cardiac pacemakers are sometimes used in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy to help maintain a stable heart rhythm.
The most commonly used pacemaker for cardiomyopathy is a dual chamber pacemaker, which attaches to the heart in two different places using tiny wires known as leads.
The pacemaker leads are then inserted into a vein under the collarbone and guided into the heart; X-rays are used to help guide the placement of the pacemaker leads.
health.usnews.com /usnews/health/heart/cardiomyopathy/cm.treat.pacemaker.htm   (655 words)

  
 Company history of Medtronic, creator of the first cardiac pacemaker
Since developing the first wearable external cardiac pacemaker in 1957 and manufacturing the first reliable long-term implantable pacing system in 1960, Medtronic has been the world's leading producer of pacing technology.
Today, Medtronic is the world's leading medical technology company, providing lifelong solutions for people with chronic disease.
Medtronic's stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol MDT.
www.medtronic.com /corporate/history.html   (125 words)

  
  OHSU Health - Overview of Pacemakers   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A permanent pacemaker may be used to make the heartbeat if the heart's natural pacemaker (the SA node) is not functioning properly and has developed an abnormal heart rate or rhythm, or if the electrical pathways are blocked.
Pacemaker leads may be positioned in the atrium or ventricle or both, depending on the condition requiring the pacemaker to be inserted.
Pacemakers that pace both the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart and require two pacing leads are called "dual-chamber" pacemakers.
www.ohsuhealth.com /htaz/cardiac/conditions_diseases/arrhythmias/pacemakers/overview_of_pacemakers.cfm   (1287 words)

  
 Cardiac muscle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cardiac muscle is a type of involuntary mononucleated, or uninucleated, striated muscle found exclusively within the heart.
Cardiac muscle exhibits cross striations formed by alternation segments of thick and thin protein filaments which are anchored by segments called Z-lines.
Cardiac muscle can be distinguished from skeletal muscle because cardiac muscle nuclei are centrally located among the myofibrils, unlike the peripheral nuclei of skeletal muscle.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cardiac_muscle   (801 words)

  
 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cardiac pacemakers are generally implanted to alleviate symptoms of decreased cardiac output related to abnormal heart rate and/or rhythm.
Cardiac pacemakers are commonly accepted by the medical community as reasonable and necessary to treat many serious medical conditions.
The purpose of this NCD is to determine the appropriateness of removing implantation of pacemakers as the issue for which a reasonable and necessary determination is made for use of cardiac pacing.
www.cms.hhs.gov /mcd/viewdecisionmemo.asp?id=106   (1319 words)

  
 Child Health Library - Cardiovascular Disorders - Living With a Pacemaker
In the past, people with pacemakers risked interference with the proper functioning of their pacemakers if they were too close to many items common in the everyday environment.
Pacemakers currently being manufactured should not be affected by these security devices, as long as its wearer moves through and away from the detector at a normal speed.
Once the pacemaker has been implanted, children with pacemakers should be able to do the same activities everyone else in their age group is doing: living normally.
www.chp.edu /greystone/cardiac/lwp.php   (1321 words)

  
 Cardiovascular Disorders - Living With a Pacemaker
In the past, people with pacemakers risked interference with the proper functioning of their pacemakers if they were too close to many items common in the everyday environment.
Pacemakers currently being manufactured should not be affected by these security devices, as long as its wearer moves through and away from the detector at a normal speed.
Once the pacemaker has been implanted, children with pacemakers should be able to do the same activities everyone else in their age group is doing: living normally.
www.musckids.com /health_library/cardiac/lwp.htm   (1302 words)

  
 USNews.com: Health: HCM: Cardiac pacemaker implantation
Cardiac pacemakers are not the first choice for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but they can be used in those who are not candidates for--or don't want to pursue--other treatment options.
Dual chamber pacemakers, which have two leads that attach to the heart, are used to help relieve the symptoms of HOCM.
The pacemaker leads are then inserted into a vein under your collarbone and then into your heart; X-rays are used to help guide the placement of the leads.
health.usnews.com /usnews/health/heart/hcm/hcm.treat.pacemaker.htm   (643 words)

  
 Cardiac Services - Pacemaker & Defibrillators   (Site not responding. Last check: )
PACEMAKERS In patients who experience fatigue, dizziness, or fainting with a slow heartbeat, a mechanical generator is necessary to pace the heart to allow normal blood flow.
After a pacemaker is placed, there are virtually no limitations for the patient, other than decreased movement of the arm on the side where the pacemaker was placed for 1-2 weeks.
As with pacemakers, the strong magnetic fields in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit is dangerous to implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.
www.cardiacspecialists.com /pacemakerdefibrillators.htm   (801 words)

  
 Pacemaker - Page 1
Pacemakers are most commonly used to correct an abnormally slow heartbeat by sending electrical impulses to one or more chambers of the heart.
A permanent pacemaker is implanted into a patient’s chest during a minor surgical procedure.
Temporary pacemakers are often used in emergency settings, or in the case of severely symptomatic bradycardia or tachycardia.
heart.healthcentersonline.com /pacemaker/pacemaker.cfm   (588 words)

  
 Cardiac Pacemaker - Medgadget Wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Although all of the heart's cells possess the ability to generate these electrical impulses (or action potentials), a specialised portion of the heart, called the sinoatrial node, is responsible for the whole heart's beat.
As in all other cells, the resting potential of a pacemaker cell (-60mV to -70mV) is caused by a continuous outflow or "leak" of potassium ions through ion channel proteins in the membrane that surrounds the cells.
Acetylcholine (ACh) is released from the vagus nerve endings, and binds to muscarinic receptors on the pacemaker cells.
www.medgadget.com /wiki/wiki/Cardiac_Pacemaker   (939 words)

  
 ARRLWeb: Interference: Its Potential Effect on Pacemaker Systems
Most pacemaker circuitry uses filters to attenuate electromagnetic interference (EMI) outside the normal intracardiac range and, whereas this design is effective when the interference characteristics are quite different from detected signals associated with cardiac activity, some EMI can produce signals that are similar enough to normal intracardiac activity to cause problems.
The presence of a cardiac pacemaker is considered a contraindication to extracorporeal electrohydraulic shock wave Lithotripsy, due to the possibility of electrical interference from the spark gap used to produce the shock waves, or damage to the pulse generator from the shock waves.
We suggest that pacemaker patients, particularly those who wish to continue working in potentially interference-rich environments, be counseled by their cardiologist on the effects of environmental interference and the likely response of their pacemaker system to the interference, as well as to the most effective ways of avoiding interference in their specific environment.
www.arrl.org /tis/info/pcmkr.html   (3182 words)

  
 Cardiac Pacemakers - MC
Cardiac Pacemakers - MC Cardiac Pacemakers - MC A cardiac pacemaker is a prosthetic device that helps to set the heartbeat rhythm when a heart is unable to maintain a consistent rhythm on its own.
Patients with a history of Pacemaker Syndrome (atrial ventricular asynchrony), with significant symptoms with a previous pacemaker.
Dual-chamber pacemakers may also be covered for the conditions as listed for single-chamber implanted permanent cardiac pacemakers, if the medical necessity is sufficiently justified through adequate claims development.
www.healthpartners.com:747 /medicare/cardiac_pacemakers_mc.html   (892 words)

  
 Cardiac Pacemaker
pacemakers can be used after damage to the body's intrinsic conduction system to produce these impulses synthetically.
The reason the SA node controls the whole heart, is that its action potentials are released most often, this triggers other cells to generate their own action potentials.
The action potential generated by the SA node, passes down the cardiac conduction system, and arrives before the other cells have had a chance to generate their own spontaneous action potential.
www.edinformatics.com /inventions_inventors/pacemaker_cardiac.htm   (880 words)

  
 USNews.com: Health: HCM: Cardiac pacemaker implantation
Cardiac pacemakers are not the first choice for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but they can be used in those who are not candidates for--or don't want to pursue--other treatment options.
Though nearly all patients say they feel better soon after the pacemaker is implanted, many patients report improvements in their symptoms even with the pacemaker turned off, indicating a significant placebo effect.
After the leads are in place, the pacemaker is slipped into a small, surgically created pocket under the skin in the upper part of the chest.
www.usnews.com /usnews/health/heart/hcm/hcm.treat.pacemaker.htm   (643 words)

  
 DAN Divers Alert Network : Pacemakers and Diving   (Site not responding. Last check: )
For military and commercial diving, a cardiac pacemaker is invariably considered a disqualification.
A cardiac pacemaker is implanted in the individual's subcutaneous tissue and will be exposed to the same ambient pressures as the diver.
For diving, an adequate pacemaker must be rated to perform at least a maximum depth of 130 feet / 40 meters and must operate satisfactorily during conditions of relatively rapid pressure changes - e.g., ascent and descent.
www.diversalertnetwork.org /medical/faq/faq.asp?faqid=143   (709 words)

  
 Overview of Pacemakers   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A permanent pacemaker may be used to make the heartbeat if the heart's natural pacemaker (the SA node) is not functioning properly and has developed an abnormally slow heart rate or rhythm, or if the electrical pathways are blocked.
A new type of pacemaker, called a biventricular pacemaker, is currently used in the treatment of heart failure.
Pacemaker leads may be positioned in the right atrium, right ventricle or both, depending on the condition requiring the pacemaker to be inserted.
www.healthsystem.virginia.edu /UVAHealth/adult_cardiac/paceover.cfm   (1409 words)

  
 Cardiac pacemaker - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Artificial devices also called pacemakers can be used after damage to the body's intrinsic conduction system to produce these impulses synthetically.
As in all other cells, the resting potential of a pacemaker cell (-60mV to -70mV) is caused by a continuous outflow or "leak" of potassium ions through ion channel proteins in the membrane that surrounds the cells.
Acetylcholine (ACh) is released from the vagus nerve endings, and binds to muscarinic receptors on the pacemaker cells.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cardiac_pacemaker   (1131 words)

  
 Cardiac Arrhythmia , Electrophysiology, and Pacemaker Services at Mass General Hospital in Boston, MA   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Established in 1978, the Electrophysiology (EP) and Pacemaker Laboratory at MGH is one of New England's premier diagnostic and treatment centers for cardiac arrhythmias.
Cardiac Arrhythmia can be diagnosed using two types of tests (often referred to as studies).
As the population continues to age and the prevalence of cardiac risk factors rises, the incidence of HF is expected to increase significantly over the ensuing decades.Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) or CRT-D (CRT with defibrillator therapy) is an innovative therapeutic option for patients with refractory HF.
www.massgeneral.org /cardiology/cardiology/arrhythmia.html   (2900 words)

  
 Cardiac Pacemakers From the Patient's Perspective -- Wood and Ellenbogen 105 (18): 2136 -- Circulation
Cardiac Pacemakers From the Patient's Perspective -- Wood and Ellenbogen 105 (18): 2136 -- Circulation
Wires are placed through the blood vessel beneath the collarbone to the heart and are connected to the pacemaker.
A dual chamber pacemaker is shown here that has wires to both the upper (atrium) and lower (ventricle) chambers of the right side of the heart.
circ.ahajournals.org /cgi/content/full/105/18/2136   (773 words)

  
 Biventricular pacemaker: Cardiac resynchronization therapy for heart failure - MayoClinic.com
The surgery to implant a biventricular pacemaker can be performed with local anesthetics and a sedative that puts you in a relaxed state but allows you to remain aware of your surroundings.
Although unlikely, your pacemaker could misinterpret the cell phone signal as a heartbeat and cause the pacemaker or defibrillator to function inappropriately.
Cardiac resynchronization therapy through the use of a biventricular pacemaker has proved to significantly improve quality of life and long-term outcomes for many people with heart failure that doesn't respond to the usual drug therapy.
www.mayoclinic.com /health/biventricular-pacemaker/HB00084/rss=1   (1271 words)

  
 Cardiac Pacemaker Module 2
Causes include a pacemaker sensitivity that is set to high, electromagnetic interference from an outside source that has altered the programming of the pacemaker, a sensing of the T-waves instead of the QRS, or sensing of skeletal muscle contractions.
Pacing at an altered rate occurs when the pacemaker spikes are not produced at the preset rate.
Pacemaker syndrome results in the loss of AV synchrony, which results in a decreased cardiac output.
www.ocalaregional.com /CustomPage.asp?guidCustomContentID={BB3C9F2D-2A0D-4FBB-BFCC-EA2DC784FAA7}   (1518 words)

  
 [No title]
A normal heartbeat is created by electrical impulses that are generated within a specialized area of the heart and travel down specific pathways to stimulate the cardiac muscle to contract.
In some cases, if this natural “pacemaker” is dysfunctional for some reason, a physician may opt to use an artificial electronic device called a pacemaker to stimulate the heart.
Pacemakers may stimulate either the upper chambers of the heart (atria), or both the upper and lower chambers (atria and ventricles).
www.limamemorial.org /AVP/Services/?id=104   (359 words)

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