Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Carl Woese


Related Topics
RNA

In the News (Mon 25 Mar 19)

  
  Carl Woese - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carl Woese (born July 15, 1928) is an American microbiologist famous for defining the Archaea (a new domain or kingdom of life) in 1977 by phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA, a technique pioneered by Woese and which is now standard practice.
Woese was a MacArthur Fellow in 1984, was made a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1988, received the Leeuwenhoek medal (microbiology's highest honor) in 1992, and was a National Medal of Science recipient in 2000.
Woese is currently a professor of Microbiology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Carl_Woese   (265 words)

  
  Carl Woese - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Carl Richard Woese (born July 15, 1928) is an American microbiologist famous for defining the Archaea (a new domain or kingdom of life) in 1976 by phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA, a technique pioneered by Woese and which is now standard practice.
Woese was a MacArthur Fellow in 1984, was made a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1988, received the Leeuwenhoek medal (microbiology's highest honor) in 1992, and was a National Medal of Science recipient in 2000.
Woese is currently a professor of Microbiology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Carl_Woese   (361 words)

  
 Microbiologist Carl R. Woese named winner of National Medal of Science
Carl R. Woese, a University of Illinois microbiologist whose identification of the archaea changed the way life is classified on Earth, is among 12 U.S. scientists and engineers named today (Nov. 13) by President Clinton as winners of the National Medal of Science.
Woese, who holds the UI Stanley O. Ikenberry Endowed Chair, said: "This award represents a recognition by peers and public alike that the incredible diversity of life on this planet, most of which is microbial, can only be understood in an evolutionary framework.
Woese's molecular studies of RNA sequences led to the realization that the archaea were distinct from the two accepted classifications.
www.news.uiuc.edu /news/00/1113woese.html   (524 words)

  
 Carl Woese - Palaeos   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carl Richard Woese (born July 15, 1928) is an American microbiologist famous for defining the Archaea (a new domain or kingdom of life) in 1977 by phylogenetic taxonomy of 16S ribosomal RNA, a technique pioneered by Woese and which is now standard practice.
Woese also conjectured an era in which there was a considerable amount of lateral transfer of genes between organisms.
Woese's work is also significant in terms of its implications for the search for life on other planets.
www.palaeos.org /Carl_Woese   (487 words)

  
 Amherst Magazine Fall 2002: Darwin's Dsciple
And so began what for Woese would be several decades of analyzing cellular RNA in order to compare one type of microorganism against another, en route to his over-arching accomplishment: the establishment of a phylogenetic map, or “tree of life,” which allows biologists everywhere to understand the ancestral links among everything that lives on earth.
Carl Woese ’50 has received this year’s Crafoord Prize in Biosciences, given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
Woese's paper, "Towards a natural system of organisms: proposal for the domains Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya," is available as a PDF from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science Website
www.amherst.edu /magazine/issues/02fall/features/woese3.html   (1006 words)

  
 Theory Challenges Darwin Doctrine Of Common Descent
This is the theory of Carl Woese, a microbiologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
In the late 1970s, Woese identified the Archaea, a group of microorganisms that thrive primarily in extremely harsh environments, as a separate life form from the planet's two long-accepted lines -- the typical bacteria and the eukaryotes (creatures like animals, plants, fungi and certain unicellular organisms, whose cells have a visible nucleus).
He rejects the widely-held notion that endosymbiosis (which led to chloroplasts and mitochondria) was the driving force in the evolution of the eukaryotic cell itself or that it was a determining factor in cellular evolution, because that approach assumes a beginning with fully evolved cells.
unisci.com /stories/20022/0618021.htm   (831 words)

  
 New Theory Fills In The Gap Before Darwin
A new theory by leading evolutionary microbiologist Carl Woese, which may revolutionize notions on the origin of life, suggests that life really began with at least three primitive cell-like structures engaged in a promiscuous gene-swapping free-for-all more than 3 billion years ago.
Woese proposes a form of horizontal evolution in which genes are passed around more like soccer balls from one player to the next without causing any significant changes in the basic structure of the pre-cellular organisms.
But Woese says horizontal gene transfer was the initial driving force of evolution that led life from the organic chemical muck to bacteria, eukaryotes and archaea upon which Darwin's evolution has done its more elaborate work.
www.rense.com /general26/newtheoryfillsin.htm   (550 words)

  
 The Darwinian Interlude   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carl Woese published a provocative and illuminating article, “A New Biology for a New Century,” in the June 2004 issue of Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews.
Carl Woese is the world’s greatest expert in the field of microbial taxonomy.
Woese is postulating a golden age of pre-Darwinian life, during which horizontal gene transfer was universal and separate species did not exist.
www.technologyreview.com /articles/05/03/issue/magaphone.asp   (885 words)

  
 A Tale of Woese   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Woese declared the microorganisms whose RNA he had been studying for years alone in the red brick microbiology lab on the third floor of Morrill Hall on the campus of the University of Illinois deserved a branch of life all to themselves.
Woese was telling biology it had overlooked or misclassified one third of all life, that their spectrum was missing a primary color.
Woese began in the late 60s with the intent of discovering the evolutionary history of microbes, whose evolution covers most of Earth's 4.5 billion year history.
home.earthlink.net /~douglaspage/id30.html   (2440 words)

  
 New cellular evolution theory rejects Darwinian assumptions
Woese presents his theory of cellular evolution, which challenges long-held traditions and beliefs of biologists, in the June 18 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
In the late 1970s Woese identified the Archaea, a group of microorganisms that thrive primarily in extremely harsh environments, as a separate life form from the planet's two long-accepted lines — the typical bacteria and the eukaryotes (creatures like animals, plants, fungi and certain unicellular organisms, whose cells have a visible nucleus).
This, Woese said, is exactly what would be expected had they individually begun as distinct entities, but during their subsequent evolutions they had engaged in genetic cross-talk — they had indulged in a commerce of genes.
www.eurekalert.org /pub_releases/2002-06/uoia-nce061402.php   (822 words)

  
 Carl WOESE - Vikipedio
Carl WOESE (1928-) [karl vos] estas Usona mikrobisto kiu famiĝis pro la eltrovo de la Arkioj (nova "regno" de vivularo) en 1977 tra filogenetika analizo de 16S ribosoma RNA, metodon kiun Woese inventis, sed estas nun tre ofte uzata.
Woese estis tre kuraĝa kaj ne forĵetis sian revolucian ideon.
Woese estis elektita al la (usona) Nacia Akademio de Sciencoj en 1988, gajnis la Leeuwenhoek-Medalon (la plej alta honoro en mikrobiologio) en 1992, kaj gajnis la (usonan) Nacian Medalon de Scienco en 2000.
eo.wikipedia.org /wiki/Carl_WOESE   (177 words)

  
 Extended Phenotype: Carl Woese, Common Descent, and "Intelligent Design"   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
This isn't exactly news, but their twisting of Carl Woese' views on common descent is particularly indicative of the unscientific nature of Intelligent Design, and its status as a political rather than scientific effort.
Woese is something of an icon within modern evolutionary biology, having spent his career probing the mysteries of the earliest phylogeny of life.
Instead, Woese is saying something much more subtle: horizontal gene transfer in the early history of acellular and cellular life may account equally well for the ubiquity of a common biochemical basis for life and strong homology among coding and transcription mechanisms.
blog.mmadsen.org /2004/09/carl_woese_comm.html   (1117 words)

  
 ScienceDaily: New Cellular Evolution Theory Rejects Darwinian Assumptions
Woese presents his theory of cellular evolution, which challenges long-held traditions and beliefs of biologists, in the June 18 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
In the late 1970s Woese identified the Archaea, a group of microorganisms that thrive primarily in extremely harsh environments, as a separate life form from the planet's two long-accepted lines the typical bacteria and the eukaryotes (creatures like animals, plants, fungi and certain unicellular organisms, whose cells have a visible nucleus).
This, Woese said, is exactly what would be expected had they individually begun as distinct entities, but during their subsequent evolutions they had engaged in genetic cross-talk they had indulged in a commerce of genes.
www.sciencedaily.com /releases/2002/06/020618072709.htm   (1259 words)

  
 Carl R. Woese
Woese, C. (2004) A New Biology for a New Century.
Woese, C.R. (2002) On the evolution of cells.
Woese, C.R., Olsen, G.J., Ibba, M., and Soll, D. (2000) Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, the genetic code, and the evolutionary process.
www.life.uiuc.edu /micro/faculty/faculty_woese.htm   (338 words)

  
 Carl Woese
Carl Woese (born July 15, 1928) is an American microbiologist famous for discovering the Archaea (a new domain or kingdom of life) in 1977 by phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA, a technique pioneered by Woese but which is now standard practice.
The acceptance of the validity of the Archaea, which are prokaryotes but not Bacteria was a slow and painful process.
The text of this article is licensed under the GFDL.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ca/Carl_Woese.html   (197 words)

  
 The Hindu : Fresh light on cellular theory
The driving force in evolving cellular life on Earth, says Carl Woese, a microbiologist at the University of Illinois, has been horizontal gene transfer, in which acquisition of alien cell components, including genes and proteins, work to promote evolution of recipient cellular entities.
Woese argues that these three life forms evolved separately but exchanged genes, which he refers to as inventions, along the way.
Woese calls this critical point in a cell's evolutionary course, the Darwinian Threshold, a time when a genealogical trail, or the origin of a species, begins.
www.hinduonnet.com /thehindu/seta/2002/08/15/stories/2002081500030200.htm   (463 words)

  
 NAI: News Stories   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Woese is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and he had previously received a Macarthur “genius” award and the National Medal of Science, among many other honors.
More than perhaps any other scientist, Carl Woese has focused our attention on the invisible but pervasive microbial world, a realm that extends far beyond the pathogenic bacteria that are studied in medical science.
Based on these discoveries, Woese in 1990 proposed the now-accepted division of life in a paper entitled “Towards a natural system of organisms: Proposals for the domains of Archeae, Bacteria, and Eucarya.” In spite of their name, the archaea are not older than the bacteria.
nai.arc.nasa.gov /news_stories/news_detail.cfm?ID=274   (1181 words)

  
 Evolutionists have it all figured out (again)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
A new theory by leading evolutionary microbiologist Carl Woese of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, which could revolutionize notions on the origin of life, suggests that life really began with at least three primitive cell-like structures engaged in a promiscuous gene-swapping free-for-all more than 3 billion years ago.
But Woese says that an even earlier form of evolution took place during that unknown period under a completely different set of rules.
Woese has not even proved that such structures ever existed, let alone gave rise to the origin of life as we know it.
www.bookchapterverse.com /bookchapterverse/news/news062002.htm   (747 words)

  
 MacArthur Foundation's 25th Anniversary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Carl R. Woese offers a plainspoken explanation for his accomplishments, which include the discovery of a third kingdom of life, the formulation of a revolutionary molecular-based taxonomy, and, most recently, the development of a far-reaching theory that reconceptualizes how life on the planet began.
Woese's studies of ribosomal RNA sequences in microorganisms changed everything.
With the old paradigm upended and Woese's molecular-based methods in hand, researchers saw breakthroughs ranging from the diagnosis of pathogens to the discovery of new life forms.
www.macfdn.org /anniv/nurturing_individual_creativity/lifes_meaning_on_molecular_level.htm   (295 words)

  
 Arkae
Woese bu grupların canlıların temel düzeyde birbirinden farklı birer kolu sayılması gerektiğini savunmuştur.
Carl Woese, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Woese, Carl R.; Fox, George E. Phylogenetic Structure of the Prokaryotic Domain: The Primary Kingdoms.
www.birseyogren.com /hakkinda/archaea   (1165 words)

  
 Carl Woese
As an undergraduate, Carl Woese (1928-) was excited by math and physics.
As Woese puts it "…microbiologists couldn’t tell in general whether two bacterial strains were as closely related as rats and mice or as distantly related as birds and elephants." Instead of the familiar classification scheme using families and phyla, microbiologists had invented Bergey’s manual.
In the 1980s, Woese and his colleagues appalled many microbiologists by suggesting that instead of two basic divisions of life, bacteria and eukaryotes, there were three: bacteria, eukaryotes and these extreme organisms which they called the archaea.
www.mhhe.com /biosci/cellmicro/nester/graphics/nester3ehp/common/woese.html   (515 words)

  
 LAS Alumni: News About LAS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences honored Carl Woese, 75, for his discovery of a third domain of life.
Woese and Wolfe showed that there was a third lineage, which they labeled the archaea.
In 1989, Woese was appointed to the Center for Advanced Study, the highest faculty recognition of the Urbana campus.
wwwtest2.las.uiuc.edu /alumni/news/03spring_microbiologist.html   (341 words)

  
 Illinois researchers to play key roles in study of emergence of life
The polar requirement, Woese said, is a measure of chemical properties centering on the chromatographic mobility of amino acids.
Goldenfeld and Woese's preliminary research for the FIBR project has shown how the genetic code could have evolved along with the community of organisms that was the precursor of all life on Earth.
Woese is famous for his celebrated construction of the first Tree of Life -- the family history of all life on Earth -- that has contributed to major revisions in how biology is taught and practiced around the world.
www.eurekalert.org /pub_releases/2005-09/uoia-irt092805.php   (1246 words)

  
 ARCHAIC GENOME
The project to sequence M. jannaschii is part of the Department of Energy's Microbial Genome Program, which was launched in 1994 as a spinoff from the DOE's Human Genome Program to provide a complete analysis of the DNA of several microorganisms.
In terms of microbiology, Woese and Olsen said, microbial genomics will help to make sense of microbial diversity, providing an understanding of the microbial underpinnings of the biosphere that are essential to the maintenance of all life on Earth.
Woese's development of the use of ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons has revolutionized the process of identifying life forms, Olsen said.
www.accessexcellence.org /WN/SUA08/arch896.html   (803 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.