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Topic: Cathedral diagram


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In the News (Tue 29 Jul 14)

  
  Cathedral - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Anglican, Roman Catholic and some Lutheran churches, which serves as the central church of a diocese, and thus as a bishop's seat.
In 1542 the abbey was declared a cathedral by Henry VIII.
The Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, the cathedral church of Rome, alone in Western Europe possesses a patriarchal character among Roman Catholics, since the Pope is the Patriarch of the Latin Rite church.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Cathedral   (2846 words)

  
 Gothic Field Guide to Architectural Terms
The main body, or nave, of the cathedral is usually divided into one main and two side aisles.
- the recesses on the sides of aisles in cathedrals and abbey churches.
- in cathedral architecture, the north and south projections or "arms" of the cross.
www.newyorkcarver.com /Glossary.htm   (1042 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Notre Dame   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Cathedral of Chartres The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles (80 km) from Paris, is considered one of the finest examples in all France of the Gothic style of architecture.
Notre-Dame Cathedral Basilica at 385 Sussex Drive The Notre-Dame Cathedral Basilica is the oldest church in Ottawa and the seat of the citys Catholic archbishop.
Organ Gallery and Stained Glass Notre-Dame Cathedral is the Catholic cathedral of the City of Luxembourg.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Notre-Dame   (1497 words)

  
  Floor plan of an English Gothic Cathedral   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Cathedrals took the general shape of a cross or crucifix.
The chapter-house, here to the north of the north transept, was used for the more formal gatherings of the "chapter", the group of monks that lived in the cathedral and formed its governing body.
It contained an altar to her and was usually at the eastern-most point of the cathedral.
members.tripod.com /~gothic_architecture/floorplan.html   (166 words)

  
  Cathedral   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
A Cathedral is a large imposing Christian church, technically the central church of a bishopric.
John Lateran, the cathedral church of the Pope as bishop of Rome and patriarch of the West, alone in Western Europe possesses potentially a patriarchal character.
In Germany and in Scandinavia, and in a few of the cathedral churches in the south of France, the provost was the ordinary head of the cathedral chapter, but the office was not common elsewhere.
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/c/ca/cathedral.html   (2373 words)

  
 Cathedral diagram - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The end with the altar in it is normally at the east (right in the diagrams), for symbolic religious reasons, though frequently the building cannot be disposed in such a way as to make that orientation very precise.
When cathedrals are enlarged, the nave may be extended and a narthex added, the choir may be rebuilt with an ambulatory and chapels, but most usually the consecrated place that is the sanctuary remains at the same place.
Outside the cathedral there is often a "chapter house" where the monks or priests whose church it was would hold their meetings about church business; chapter houses are often round and are usually connected to the church building.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cathedral_diagram   (866 words)

  
 Cathedral diagram   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The diagram below represents the floor plan of the Abbey of St.-Denis, showing the parts of a Gothic church.
The apse did not last long as an architectural fashion; in Europe it was replaced by the rounded "chevet," and in England by squared-off east ends, and as the cathedrals were rebuilt or repaired, their apses were remodeled into the newer shapes.
There was also usually a "cloister," a rectangular colonnade around a grass lawn, where the monks could walk, and their work or study cubicles often opened onto it.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/cathedral_diagram   (782 words)

  
 Search Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
cathedral cathedral, church in which a bishop presides.
Hertzsprung-Russell diagram Hertzsprung-Russell diagram [for Ejnar Hertzsprung and H. Russell], graph (see illustration) showing the luminosity of a star as a function of its surface temperature.
phase diagram phase diagram, graph that shows the relation between the solid, liquid, and gaseous states of a substance (see states of matter) as a function of the temperature and pressure.
www.encyclopedia.com /searchpool.asp?target=Cathedral+diagram   (550 words)

  
 Cathedral Architecture Encyclopedia Article, Definition, History, Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The essential element of a cathedral is the cathedra, the throne of the bishop.
In the cathedrals of the southwest of France, where the naves are covered with a series of domes - as at Cahors, Angoulême and St Front de Périgueux - the immense piers required to carry them made it necessary to dispense with aisles.
Returning to the great cathedrals in the north of France, Amiens cathedral shows the disposition of a cathedral, with its nave-arches, triforium, clerestory windows and vault, the flying buttresses which were required to carry the thrust of the vault to the outer buttresses which flanked the aisle walls, and the lofty pinnacles which surmounted them.
encyclopedia.localcolorart.com /encyclopedia/Cathedral_architecture   (1745 words)

  
 > Cathedral abcworld.net   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Lutheran or Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric.
In this sense therefore, the word cathedral, though grammatically used as a noun, is originally the adjective in the phrase cathedral church, from the Latin ecclesia cathedralis.
Although a cathedral may be amongst the grandest of churches in the diocese (and country), especially in the medieval and Renaissance times, this has never been a requirement and (especially in modern times, where functionality rather than grandeur is the foremost consideration) a cathedral church may be modest in structure.
www.abcworld.net /Cathedral.html   (2822 words)

  
 St. Anne\'s Cathedral Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
This parish serves as the Cathedral parish for the Archdiocese of Dubuque
The word ''cathedral'' is derived from the Greek languageGreek noun '''''καθηρα''''' (''cathedra'') which translates as ''seat'' and refers to the presence of the bishop's (or archbishop's) chair or throne.
The removal of a bishop's ''cathedra'' from a church deprives that church of its cathedral dignity, although often the name clings in common speech, as for example at Antwerp (city)Antwerp, which was deprived of its bishop at the French Revolution.
www.echostatic.com /St._Anne's_Cathedral.html   (2573 words)

  
 BBC Education - History 2000   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
At Salisbury Cathedral, it is possible to see that the piers have been slightly bent out of shape by the weight of the tower.
The cathedrals of Britain span the millennium - from the cathedrals that date to the 1100's to the modern cathedrals which are found in Liverpool and Coventry.
Cathedrals were brightly coloured and decorated in the Middle Ages before much of the interior decoration and medieval art was destroyed in the Reformation as well the Civil War in the 1600's.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/programmes/cathedral/primer.shtml   (474 words)

  
 Cathedral diagram -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
At the ends of the transept were doors, too, and outside them were (A structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance) porches that were used for various rituals.
The end with the (A raised structure on which gifts or sacrifices to a god are made) altar in it was normally at the east (left in the diagrams), for symbolic religious reasons, though frequently the building could not be disposed in such a way as to make that orientation very precise.
Outside the cathedral would be the " (Click link for more info and facts about chapter house) chapter house" where the monks or priests whose church it was would hold their meetings about church business; chapter houses were often round and were always connected to the church building.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/c/ca/cathedral_diagram.htm   (628 words)

  
 gothic cathedral and church construction | France zone at abelard.org
When you reach Britain, the cathedrals are generally lower and with lower-pitched roofs [1], in part because of the higher wind speeds.
The main weight of the cathedral structure is carried downwards by the tall pillars that march along the nave and the side aisles.
The French cathedrals were, in general, serving towns and were a matter of civic pride; there was even the equivalent of a race to build bigger and taller [see Beauvais - in preparation], just as with modern skyscrapers.
www.abelard.org /france/cathedral-construction.php   (2298 words)

  
 wikien.info: Main_Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
A Cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an Episcopal hierarchy, which serves as the central church of a bishopric.
Although a cathedral may be amongst the grandest of churches in the diocese (and country), especially in the medieval and rennaisance times, this has never been a requirement and (especially in modern times, where functionality rather than grandure are the foremost consideration) a cathedral church may be modest in structure.
Cathedral is the name of a British heavy metal band.
pardus.info /index.php?title=Cathedral   (2634 words)

  
 The Nave & Labyrinth Floor Tapestry
The Labyrinth (2007) is based on the sacred diagram in the nave pavement of Chartres Cathedral, France.
Cathedral labyrinths were originally used by townspeople to reenact or substitute for the pilgrimage to the site of Christ's Crucifixion and Resurrection in Jerusalem.
This labyrinth is in use as a devotional tool for spiritual growth and inner healing and was revived at Grace Cathedral in 1991 under the guidance of Canon Lauren Artress.
www.gracecathedral.org /church/tour/tour_5.shtml   (149 words)

  
 Cathedral diagram: Encyclopedia - Cathedral diagram
Many abbey churches have floorplans that are comparable to cathedrals, though sometimes with more emphasis on the sanctuary and choir spaces that are reserved for the religious community.
The semi-circular end of the church around the high altar, which corresponds to the apse in Romanesque and Roman architecture, is often expanded into a passage called an ambulatory (from the Latin to walk), with radiating chapels disposed around the outer wall of the ambulatory.
Aisle, Bourges, Canterbury Cathedral, Cathedral architecture, Chantries, Lady Chapel, Latin, Mary, the mother of Jesus, Mass, Nave, Notre-Dame de Paris, Romanesque, aisle, altar, ambulatory, apse, cathedral, chapels, chapter house, chevet, clerestory, cloister, crypt, high altar, narthex, nave, patron saint, porches, prayers, presbytery, rood screen, rose window, sanctuary, shrines, stained glass, transept, vaulting
www.experiencefestival.com /a/Cathedral_diagram/id/1948562   (1134 words)

  
 List of Illustrations - Section 3
This iconographical image of Mary presenting the Christ Child to the world is particularly associated with the Cathedral of Chartres.
Royal Portal, the central three doorways on the facade of Charters Cathedral, *photographed by Dr. Robert Prestiano (c).
former Cathedral of “Holy Wisdom" in the former Christian capitol of Constantinople, architects Anthemius of Tralles and Isidorus of Melitus, presently used as a museum; Istanbul, Turkey, 532-37 CE.
www.angelo.edu /faculty/rprestia/1301/list_of_illustrations3.htm   (2279 words)

  
 cathedrals - introduction: reading stained glass | France zone at abelard.org
While I shall be telling you about gothic cathedrals and stained glass from many points of view, and with varying detail, it is well that I start by introducing you to my prejudices.
When you have left the cathedral and are several miles down the road, you will remember that you meant to take a particular photograph or some note.
“This cathedral was destroyed at the beginning of the nineteenth century, but by an extraordinary piece of luck, and thanks to a photograph of a no longer existing model of Cambrai, we can admire the choir which was built at the time of Villard, perhaps by the master himself.
www.abelard.org /france/cathedrals-intro.php   (2604 words)

  
 Cathedral   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
A cathedral is a ChristianityChristian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishop/ric.
The cathedral church of St. John Lateran, the cathedral church of the Pope as bishop of Rome and patriarch of the West, alone in Western Europe/ possesses potentially a patriarchal character.
Vistor numbers at Coventry Cathedral are plummeting as coaches loaded with tourists bypass the city because of lack of parking.
www.infothis.com /find/Cathedral   (2783 words)

  
 nave   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
In Romanesque and Gothic Christian abbey, cathedral and church architecture, the nave (Medieval Latin navis, "ship," probably from the keel shape of its vaulting) is the central and principal part of a church, extending from the entry narthex to the chancel and flanked by lower aisles outside the nave area (plan, right).
The nave, ecclesiastically considered, was the area reserved for the non-clergy (the "laity"), while the chancel or choir were reserved for the clergy, and a rood screen separated the sanctuary from the nave (see Cathedral diagram for details).
Highest vaulted nave: Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, 124 feet (Beauvais is 150 feet high in the choir.)
www.yourencyclopedia.net /nave.html   (405 words)

  
 Rosslyn Chapel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Construction of the chapel began in 1440, and the chapel was officially founded in 1446.
In September 2005 a musical cipher hidden in mystical symbols carved into the stone ceiling of Rosslyn Chapel was reported as being unravelled by Scottish composer Stuart Mitchell.
These chambers are filled with pure white Arabic sand-- rumoured to have been brought to the chapel by the Knights Templar from the Dome of the Rock -- and ultrasonic scans have revealed six leaden vaults within the sand.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Rosslyn_Chapel   (964 words)

  
 Station Information - Cathedral diagram
For comparison, here is the plan of Tewkesbury Abbey with the corresponding parts highlighted in the same colors.
This area was also where criminals seeking the right of sanctuary were safe from the law.
This picture shows the inside of Salisbury Cathedral, looking west from behind the high altar.
www.stationinformation.com /encyclopedia/c/ca/cathedral_diagram.html   (632 words)

  
 Apse
The apse is coloured gray (ambulatory and radiating chapels) and green (sanctuary).]] In Romanesque and Gothic Christian abbey, cathedral and church architecture, the apse (Latin absis "arch, vault"; sometimes written apsis; plural apses) is the semi-circular or polygonal section of the sanctuary at the liturgical east end beyond the altar (plan, right).
The semicircular projection (which may be polygonal on the exterior, or reveal the radiating projections of chapels) may be roofed with a half-dome or with radiating vaulting.
Such radiating chapels are found in England in Norwich and Canterbury cathedrals, but the fully-developed feature is essentially French, though the Francophil connoisseur Henry III introduced it into Westminster Abbey.
pedia.newsfilter.co.uk /wikipedia/a/ap/apse.html   (454 words)

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