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Topic: Cavaliers (royalists)


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In the News (Wed 17 Jul 19)

  
 Roundhead - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Royalists, on the other side, were the nicknamed Cavaliers.
The Roundheads were so nicknamed because of the relatively short plain page boy style haircuts favoured by Puritans, rather than the long ringlets of the fashionable courtly Cavaliers.
Some historians think that the Roundheads had more supporters than the cavaliers.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Roundhead   (173 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
The Cavaliers evolved into the Tory Party, royalists intent on preserving the king's authority over Parliament, while the Roundheads transformed into the Whig Party, men of property dedicated to expanding trade abroad and maintaining Parliament's supremacy in the political field.
This moment was a turning point in English political history, as Parliament maintained a superior position to that of the king, and the modern concept of political parties formed from the ashes of the Cavaliers and Roundheads.
www.britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon49.html   (173 words)

  
 ipedia.com: University of Virginia Article
The University's sports teams are called the Cavaliers; this mascot is a mounted swordsman referring to a time when Virginia earned its name, the "Old Dominion." The Commonwealth was a hotbed for royalists to the crown, called cavaliers in the days of the English Civil War.
The traditional band at UVA, or more precisely, the Virginia Pep Band, operates under the same ideals of student governance, choosing a director from the student body to head the mischievous scramble band.
In 1951 Walter N. Ridley left his position as a psychology professor at Virginia State University and soon became the first African-American graduate of the University, receiving a doctorate in education in 1953.
www.ipedia.com /university_of_virginia.html   (1165 words)

  
 Lynch, Literary Terms — Cavalier Poetry
They get their name from the supporters of King Charles I in the seventeenth century: the Cavaliers were Royalists during the Civil Wars.
Whereas the Metaphysical poets were fond of abstruse imagery and complicated metaphors, the Cavaliers preferred more straightforward expression.
It's traditional to oppose the Cavalier poets to the
newark.rutgers.edu /~jlynch/Terms/cavalier.html   (165 words)

  
 Cavalier Poets: An Introduction.
In fact the common factor that binds the cavaliers together is their use of direct and colloquial language expressive of a highly individual personality, and their enjoyment of the casual, the amateur, the affectionate poem written by the way.
They are 'cavalier' in the sense, not only of being Royalists (though Waller changed sides twice), but in the sense that they distrust the over-earnest, the too intense.
It may all sound rather trivial, and much of it no doubt is; but the Cavaliers made one great contribution to the English Lyrical Tradition.
www.luminarium.org /sevenlit/cavintro.htm   (480 words)

  
 Cavaliers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
However "Cavalier" is chiefly associated with the Royalists, the supporters of King Charles I in his struggle with Parliament in the English Civil War.
Cavaliers was the name used by Parliamentarians for the Royalist supporters of King Charles I during the English Civil War (1642–1651).
It is this image which has survived and many Royalists, for example Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl of Rochester, fitted this description to a tee.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cavaliers   (582 words)

  
 January 25: Debut of the opera I Puritani
The opera, I Puritani, by Vincenzo Bellini, was set in England, against the backdrop of the English civil war of the 1640s that divided the nation between the largely Puritan supporters of Parliament under Oliver Cromwell (the Roundheads) and the Anglican and Catholic Royalists faithful to the Stuart monarchy (the Cavaliers).
January 25: Debut of the opera I Puritani
January 25, 1835 • Debut of I Puritani, an Opera about Puritans.
chi.gospelcom.net /DAILYF/2002/01/daily-01-25-2002.shtml   (490 words)

  
 January 25: Debut of the opera I Puritani
The opera, I Puritani, by Vincenzo Bellini, was set in England, against the backdrop of the English civil war of the 1640s that divided the nation between the largely Puritan supporters of Parliament under Oliver Cromwell (the Roundheads) and the Anglican and Catholic Royalists faithful to the Stuart monarchy (the Cavaliers).
Bellini's Puritans were simply a handy post for the librettist to hang his arias on.
Although the music is superb, composer Vincenzo Bellini completely lost sight of faith.
chi.gospelcom.net /DAILYF/2002/01/daily-01-25-2002.shtml   (455 words)

  
 David Leslie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
He routed the main Royalist force under the Marquis of Montrose at the battle of Philiphaugh and afterwards mopped up the remaining Royalists in Kyntyre in the west of Scotland.
Leslie was second in command of the Scottish armies who were sent to fight for the English Parliament from 1644 and had won the day at the critical Battle of Marston Moor, west of York, for a wounded Oliver Cromwell, leading a cavalry charge that defeated the Royalist Cavaliers.
By refusing battle, Leslie withstood a siege at Edinburgh and when the English were forced to retreat in August 1650 he pursued them down the east coast, eventually trapping 11,000 English soldiers south of Dunbar with an army of 23,000 Scottish.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/David_Leslie   (527 words)

  
 John Lambert 1619-84
On the outbreak of the Second Civil War in 1648, he held Parliament's position in the north against Sir Marmaduke Langdale's cavaliers and the Scottish Engagers until he was joined by Cromwell after the defeat of the Royalists in Wales.
Lambert was second-in-command to Cromwell at the battle of Preston in August 1648.
He fought at the siege of Hull in 1643, and was with Sir Thomas Fairfax at the battle of Nantwich in January 1644.
www.british-civil-wars.co.uk /biog/lambert.htm   (527 words)

  
 PPE - General Information E2
The war had a religious element: the Royalists or "Cavaliers", represented Anglicanism, and Parliament, or the "Roundheads", represented the Church's Puritan wing.
In 1840 the British crown ignores the Declaration of Independence (1835) by Maori chiefs and annexes New Zealand.
Religious wars in Europe had ended, but a new type of conflict, between governor and governed, was preceded by civil war in England.
www.embassy.org.nz /encycl/e2encyc.htm   (527 words)

  
 Royalist - Psychology Central
Cavaliers, a group of English gentlemen royalists during the English Civil War.
A supporter of Ferdinand VII of Spain during the South American Wars of Independence.
A supporter of King Charles I during the English Civil War.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Royalist   (195 words)

  
 SBPL Book Review
Amber is the love child of a young aristocratic couple caught in the conflict between the Puritans and the Royalists during England's civil war of 1642 -1652.
A group of Cavaliers passes through Amber's village.
She is only able to tell her hostess that she wants to name her baby daughter Amber, "for the colour of her father's eyes." The father too appears to have been killed in the war for he never returns to the village to seek out his beloved and their child.
www.mscomm.com /~sbpl/sept_28_03.html   (999 words)

  
 IngentaConnect Kin, cash, Catholics and Cavaliers: the role of kinship in the fi...
This article considers Lambert's financial activities in respect of Catholics and royalists amongst his kin during the Interregnum.
Kin, cash, Catholics and Cavaliers: the role of kinship in the financial management of Major-General John Lambert
It argues that his assistance to them was based on kinship links established prior to 1642, and demonstrates how Lambert's aid was reciprocated by his royalist kin during his long post-Restoration imprisonment.
www.ingentaconnect.com /content/bpl/hisr/2001/00000074/00000183/art00115   (187 words)

  
 Pepys' Diary: Wednesday 20 March 1660/61
Then there are the Agrarians,Anabaptists, Baptists, the Anti- Clerics, Antinominians,Arians, Arminianians,Atheists,Agnostics,Astrologers,Barrowists, Behmentists, Brownists, Calvanists, Cavaliers, Royalists, Clubmen, Comenians, Diggers, Familists, Fifth-Monarchists, etc. They are now just keeping their own counsel.
Fox:” but we had reasonings with all the other sects, Presbyterians, Independents, Seekers, Baptists, Episcopal men, Socinians, Brownists, Lutherans, Calvinists, Arminians, Fifth-monarchy men, Familists, Muggletonians, and Ranters; ” What a cross to bear, to give witness as a ‘Muggletonian”.
The Ranters, Seekers,Levellers,Quakers all shaken up, all try to explain who should be at first base.
www.pepysdiary.com /archive/1661/03/20/index.php   (187 words)

  
 Marston Moor
On 2nd July the Royalists confronted the Parliamentarians at Marston Moor.
In June 1644 Prince Rupert and his Cavaliers set out to rescue the Earl of Newcastle and his forces.
and Thomas Fairfax, the leaders of the Parliamentary forces, decided to withdraw from Marston Moor towards Tadcaster in order to cut off any attempt by the Earl of Newcastle to escape.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /STUmarstonmoor.htm   (270 words)

  
 University of Virginia - Open Encyclopedia
The mascot is a mounted swordsman referring to the time when Virginia earned its nickname, the "Old Dominion." The Commonwealth was a hotbed for royalists to the crown, called cavaliers in the days of the English Civil War.
In an even more heated rivalry, the team faces off with in-state foe Virginia Tech each Thanksgiving Saturday for the Commonwealth Cup, annually given to the winner of this game played 85 times and every year since 1970.
The University's team shares the "Oldest Rivalry in the South" with UNC (University of North Carolina), and the schools have played 110 times, including every year since 1919.
open-encyclopedia.com /University_of_Virginia   (2769 words)

  
 Grenadier Guards - Regimental Origins
The Regiment raised by the King while abroad in Flanders was composed of a band of English Royalists and, on its formation at Bruges, was commanded by Thomas, Lord Wentworth.
The first captains in this regiment were old Cavaliers who had received commissions from Charles I to raise regiments during the Civil War.
On the death of Lord Wentworth in 1665 the two regiments were amalgamated thereby constituting one regiment of 24 companies under Colonel Russell.
www.medwaygrenadiers.org /regorigins.htm   (300 words)

  
 England's Civil War
During the next years, the struggle for supremacy continued and, in 1642, war was declared between the two factions -- Civil War between the king's faction, Royalists or Cavaliers, and the Parliamentary faction, the Roundheads.
Parliament was determined to control finances, the king equally determined that he could raise money on his own power, outside of Parliament.
In Charles' first Parliament of 1625, there were 100 lords in the Upper House and 500 men, three-quarters of whom were Puritans, in the Commons.
www.bio.umass.edu /biology/conn.river/regicide.html   (300 words)

  
 Call to the Derby Post: A History of Horse Racing
Royalists and Cavaliers were either forced out of England or in retreat to their country estates where they could do two things: maintain their records of horses bred for staghunting and racing, and wait for the end of Cromwell's repressive religious throne.
While certainly a landmark philosophy in horse racing, Henry was unable to apply its practice; his Master of the Horse, the title of Henry's racing stable director, was not a professional horseman and recklessly crossbred the entire stable.
Henry's Hobbys, as they were called, raced against horses owned by other nobility, leading the word "hobby" to mean a "costly pastime indulged in by the idle rich." It also lends credibility to horse racing being labeled as the Sport of Kings, although this phrase's orgination comes later, as found in Part II.
www.derbypost.com /history1.html   (578 words)

  
 Sample Chapter for Scodel, J.: Excess and the Mean in Early Modern English Literature.
His younger contemporaries Charles Cotton and Alexander Brome travesty classical motifs by celebrating mindless drunken and erotic excess as survival mechanisms for defeated Royalists.
In two sonnets of the 1650s Milton disputes the identification of party poetry with the Cavaliers: he celebrates a temperate pleasure appropriate for supporters rather than opponents of the Parliamentary-Puritan revolution.
Yet with mounting despair among Cavalier poets that they could do no more than ignobly survive, a nonclassical vulgarity also infects the drinking poetry of Lovelace and his contemporaries.
www.pup.princeton.edu /chapters/i7270.html   (578 words)

  
 AUGUST
1642: In Nottingham, Charles I erected his standard in front of a few hundred Royalists (Cavaliers), beginning the Civil War against the pro-parliament Roundheads in the south.
On the king’s death in 1774, she was dismissed from the court, and later died at the guillotine when the Revolutionary Tribunal found her guilty of squandering state treasures.
Charles coated the balloon’s skin with varnish, preventing gas from permeating it.
www.camelotintl.com /365_days/august.html   (7955 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
The Cavaliers evolved into the Tory Party, royalists intent on preserving the king's authority over Parliament, while the Roundheads transformed into the Whig Party, men of property dedicated to expanding trade abroad and maintaining Parliament's supremacy in the political field.
Charles II, second son of Charles I and Henrietta Marie of France, was born in 1630.
The Whigs used Catholicism to undermine Charles; England was in the throes of yet another wave of anti-Catholicism, with the Whigs employing this paranoia in an attempt to unseat the heir apparent, Charles' Catholic brother James, from succeeding to the throne.
www.britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon49.html   (826 words)

  
 The Civil War around Birmingham 1642-1648
A group of parliamentary horsemen led by Captain Richard Graves (grevis/greves) squire of Kings Norton /Moseley of Moseley Hall (still exists), (parliamentary/roundhead) were chased by royalists towards Cape Hill Smethwick Staffordshire.
She had an escort of cavaliers, 3,000 horsemen and 30 companies of foot soldiers.
July 1643 Henrietta Maria Charles I wife marched from Walsall to Kings Norton (cavalier/royalist) She stayed at the Saracen’s Head (still exists) on the green at Kings Norton.
www.virtualbrum.co.uk /history/civilwar.htm   (1585 words)

  
 August's Scottish Anniversaries
King Charles I raised his standard at Nottingham, initiating a Civil War in England between the Royalists (also known as Cavaliers) and Parliament (Roundheads).
James Stewart, Earl of Moray and a half-brother of Mary Queen of Scots, proclaimed Regent of Scotland.
James VI abducted and taken to the Castle of Ruthven by the Earls of Mar and Gowrie - the so-called "Ruthven Raid".
www.rampantscotland.com /SCM/august.htm   (1107 words)

  
 John Lambert
On the outbreak of the Second Civil War in 1648, Lambert held Parliament's position in the North against Sir Marmaduke Langdale's cavaliers and the Engagers until he was joined by Cromwell after the defeat of the Royalists in Wales.
He refused to take the oath of loyalty when Cromwell was installed as Lord Protector for life and resigned his commissions, retiring to his house in Wimbledon with his wife and ten children, where he devoted himself to painting and gardening.
When the Second Protectorate Parliament refused to grant taxes to finance the government of the Major-Generals, Lambert urged Cromwell to dispense with Parliament and allow the Major-Generals to raise taxes by force.
blacktom.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk /html/john_lambert.html   (1107 words)

  
 US Constitution, English Origins, PS201H-4D
On August 22, 1642, open military conflict commenced between the Parliamentarians, or" Roundheads," and the Royalists, or " Cavaliers." Major outcomes of the seven-year English Civil War were victory for the army of the Parliamentarians, the trial and execution of Charles I, and the abolition of the monarchy and the House of Lords.
The Crown's abrupt response was to dissolve Parliament.
The Rump Parliament was not representative of a majority of the English electorate, since the assembly's sitting members (1) comprised only a small fraction of the total number of members originally elected to the Commons in 1640 and (2) had not had to stand for reelection and face their constituents during the last nine years.
www.proconservative.net /CUNAPolSci201PartFourD.shtml   (1107 words)

  
 John Lambert
On the outbreak of the Second Civil War in 1648, Lambert held Parliament's position in the North against Sir Marmaduke Langdale's cavaliers and the Engagers until he was joined by Cromwell after the defeat of the Royalists in Wales.
When the Second Protectorate Parliament refused to grant taxes to finance the government of the Major-Generals, Lambert urged Cromwell to dispense with Parliament and allow the Major-Generals to raise taxes by force.
He refused to take the oath of loyalty when Cromwell was installed as Lord Protector for life and resigned his commissions, retiring to his house in Wimbledon with his wife and ten children, where he devoted himself to painting and gardening.
blacktom.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk /whitehorse/html/john_lambert.html   (1107 words)

  
 Parliamentarian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In this context, parliamentarians (especially New Model Army soldiers) are often referred to as Roundheads, as opposed to Royalist Cavaliers.
In English history a parliamentarian is a supporter of the Parliament, as opposed to the Royalists.
The proper noun Parliamentarian is a Member of Parliament, especially one who is particularly adept in the chamber, or an officer of a legislature charged with advising the presiding officer or members on rules and parliamentary procedure.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Parliamentarian   (203 words)

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