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Topic: Cenozoic


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In the News (Tue 25 Jun 19)

  
  Earth Floor: Geologic Time
The Cenozoic period began about 65 million years ago with the extinction of the dinosaurs and continues through the present.
Mammals, which were small, mouse-like animals at the beginning of the Cenozoic, quickly spread out, diversified in kind, and grew in size.
There have been mass extinctions during the Cenozoic as there were during the Mesozoic and Paleozoic, but not as many animals and plants have disappeared.
www.cotf.edu /ete/modules/msese/earthsysflr/cenozoic.html   (490 words)

  
  Cenozoic era. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
In the late Cenozoic, the Cascade Range of volcanoes extended from southern British Columbia to N California, and represented a new volcanic arc superimposed on older structures.
The animal life of the Cenozoic was dominated by mammals, which were most numerous in the Tertiary period and declined, with the exception of a few specialized types, in the Quaternary period.
Cenozoic land mammals were never as large as the Mesozoic dinosaurs, but many were larger than today’s mammals, and included beavers that grew to lengths of more than 7 ft (2 m), sloths as large as elephants, and birds up to 7 ft (2 m) in height.
www.bartleby.com /65/ce/Cenozoic.html   (422 words)

  
  Cenozoic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Cenozoic Era (sen-oh-ZOH-ik; sometimes Caenozoic Era in the United Kingdom) meaning "new life" (Greek kainos = new + zoe = life) is the most recent of the three classic geological eras.
The Cenozoic is divided into two periods, the Palaeogene and Neogene, and they are in turn divided into epochs.
The Cenozoic is just as much the age of savannas, or the age of co-dependent flowering plants and insects.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cenozoic   (277 words)

  
 Introduction to the Cenozoic
The Cenozoic spans only about 65 million years, from the end of the Cretaceous and the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs to the present.
The Cenozoic is sometimes called the Age of Mammals, because the largest land animals have been mammals during that time.
The Cenozoic could have been called the "Age of Flowering Plants" or the "Age of Insects" or the "Age of Teleost Fish" or the "Age of Birds" just as accurately.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu /cenozoic/cenozoic.html   (307 words)

  
 Palaeos Cenozoic: The Cenozoic Era
Traditionally, the Cenozoic Era was divided into two very unequal periods, the Tertiary (which made up the bulk of the Cenozoic), and the Quaternary, which is only the last one and a half million years or so.
More than 95% of the Cenozoic era belongs to the Tertiary period, an unreasonable division which reflects the arbitrary manner in which the geological epochs were first named.
During the Cenozoic, the fragmentation of continental landmasses continued as the Earth's surface took on its present form.
www.palaeos.com /Cenozoic/Cenozoic.htm   (2112 words)

  
 Cenozoic Era
The KT Event set the stage for the Cenozoic Era Cenozoic Era that began 65 million years ago.
Species changed as the epochs of the Cenozoic Era rolled by, with the mammals eventually becoming the largest land animals of the Era, as the dinosaurs had been during the Mesozoic.
Those that could adapt to the changes in the environment survived; those that could not were doomed to extinction.
www.fossilmuseum.net /Paleobiology/Cenozoic_Paleobiology.htm   (1015 words)

  
 The Cenozoic Era   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In the late Cenozoic, the Cascade Range of volcanoes extended from southern British Columbia to Northern California, and represented a new volcanic arc superimposed on older structures.
Theories explaining the decline or extinction of mammals during the Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs of the Quaternary period have ranged from a change in climate to the predation of humans.
Cenozoic land mammals were never as large as the Mesozoic dinosaurs, but many were larger than today’s mammals, and included beavers that grew to lengths of more than 7 feet (2 meters), sloths as large as elephants, and birds up to 7 feet (2 meters) in height.
www.science501.com /PTCenozoic.html   (951 words)

  
 Geologic Time: The Cenozoic   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It was around the start of the Cenozoic that the first primates and other mammals evolved, hence the era's nickname, the Age of Mammals.
During the Cenozoic the breakup of the Pangea supercontinent was completed, bringing the continents into their present relative positions.
Continental drift and plate tectonics influenced Earth's oceans, climate, and atmosphere, and affected the migration of animals and the spread of plants.
www.mnh.si.edu /anthro/humanorigins/faq/gt/cenozoic/cenozoic.htm   (448 words)

  
 Cenozoic era
In the late Cenozoic, the Cascade Range of volcanoes extended from southern British Columbia to N California, and represented a new volcanic arc superimposed on older structures.
The animal life of the Cenozoic was dominated by mammals, which were most numerous in the
Rocky Mountains: Formation - Formation The Rockies were formed in the Mesozoic and Early Cenozoic eras during the Cordilleran...
www.infoplease.com /ce6/sci/A0811075.html   (484 words)

  
 Cenozoic Plate-Driving Forces   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Because the weight of slabs has increased during the Cenozoic, the slab pull force has increased from about 40% of the forces on slabs early in the Cenozoic, to about 60% today.
During the second half of the Cenozoic, the speed of the Pacific plate increased relative to the other plates, as shown by its orange and red arrows (Fig.
During the Cenozoic, the slab pull force increased its contributed to the total forces on plates from about 40% early in the Cenozoic to about 60% today (Fig.
www.jhu.edu /eps/faculty/conrad/resproj/cenozoic/cenozoic.html   (602 words)

  
 THE AGE OF MAMMALS(CENOZOIC): 65-0 M.Y.B.P.
CENOZOIC): 65-0 M.Y.B.P. Mammals appeared on the earth long before the extinction of the dinosaurs; in fact, they originated in the early Jurassic about 200 million years ago.
The period between the extinction of the dinosaurs and the present day (the last 65 million years) is called the Age of Mammals or Cenozoic.
During the Cenozoic there was also tremendous radiation in other groups including birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish, leading gradually up to the peak of biological diversity that occurred in the recent past.
darwin.bio.uci.edu /~sustain/bio65/lec03/b65lec03.htm   (1587 words)

  
 The Cenozoic Era.
The Cenozoic Era spans some 65 million years, beginning 65 million years ago with the Palaeocene epoch.
It is also the longest epoch of the Cenozoic Era, spanning 20 million years.
It is the first epoch of the Cenozoic Era (and also the first epoch of the Palaeogene period) and marks the beginning of the "Age of the Mammals".
www.bobainsworth.com /fossil/cenozoic.htm   (783 words)

  
 Happenings During the Cenozoic (65 Million Years Ago to Present)
Early Cenozoic climate was warm and humid and the climate cooled gradually during the Cenozoic.
New mammal species evolved and were able to live in areas and eat foods that had been used by dinosaurs during the Mesozoic.
Grass evolved and was well adapted to the cooler climates of the late Cenozoic.
www.windows.ucar.edu /tour/link=/earth/geology/hist_cenozoic.html   (376 words)

  
 Abstract 50977: DIFFERENCES IN PALEOZOIC AND CENOZOIC DIVERSITY-ABUNDANCE STRUCTURE
A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test that the mean Paleozoic and mean Cenozoic curve are different was statistically significant (n = 90, D = 0.21, p < 0.001).
Paleozoic assemblages were dominated by few genera, each with high relative abundance: on average, 3.2 genera account for 80% of the abundance in the Paleozoic.
In contrast, Cenozoic assemblages were dominated by several genera that were more equally abundant: on average, 6.7 genera account for 80% of the abundance.
www.geol.vt.edu /paleo/gsa2000powell.htm   (513 words)

  
 Cenozoic - EvoWiki
The Cenozoic is an era of earth history, referring to the period of time from 64 million years ago, to present day.
A more familiar but obsolete dating system divided the Cenozoic into Quaternary and Tertiary Periods.
This has been replaced by the current but less familiar dating system that divides the Cenozoid into Neogene and Palaeogene Periods.
wiki.cotch.net /wiki.phtml?title=Cenozoic   (92 words)

  
 cenozoic era   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This was an era in which there was a great radiation of mammals: the mass extinction at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary left many niches open for the evolution new organisms (WGBH 2001).
The Cenozoic Era is the most modern geologic era: the beginning was marked by the K-T extinction, and the era continues to the present.
From the earliest to the most recent, the Cenozoic Era is divided into the Tertiary Period, which is subdivided into the Paleocene, Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene Epochs, and the Quaternary Period, which is subdivided into the Pleistocene and Holocene Epochs (Kazlev 2002).
hoopermuseum.earthsci.carleton.ca /evolution/equidae/cenozoicera.html   (138 words)

  
 CVO Menu - The Geologic Time Scale
The first period of the Cenozoic era (after the Mesozoic era and before the Quaternary period).
The name is derived from the Latin word for chalk ("creta") and was first applied to extensive deposits of this age that form white cliffs along the English Channel between Great Britain and France.
Swanson, et.al., 1989, Cenozoic vulcanism in the Cascade Range and Columbia Plateau, Southern Washington and Northermost Oregon, AGU Field Trip Guidebook T106
vulcan.wr.usgs.gov /Glossary/geo_time_scale.html   (910 words)

  
 Cenozoic Megafauna
This Age of the Mammals, known as the Cenozoic era, has lasted until the present day.
Many of the mammals that have evolved during the Cenozoic era are now extinct, the victims of changing climates and stronger competition.
Most of the surviving mammal evolved during the Cenozoic Era, although their ancestors may not have closely resembled their modern counterparts.
hiddenway.tripod.com /hero/cenozoic.html   (3678 words)

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