Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Cenred of Mercia


Related Topics

In the News (Tue 16 Jul 19)

  
  Cenred of Mercia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cenred (or Coenred, Coinred, Kenred) ruled the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia.
According to Bede, Cenred abdicated in favor of Aethelred's son Ceolred after four years, went with Offa (an East Saxon ruler) to Rome and was made a monk by Pope Constantine.
Cenred's name appears on several charters granting land, including ones to Waldshere the Bishop of London, Cuthswith the Abbess of Worcester, and to the Abbey of Evesham.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cenred_of_Mercia   (156 words)

  
 Mercia - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Mercia, sometimes spelled Mierce, was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy, in what is now England, in the region of the Midlands, with its heart in the valley of the River Trent and its tributary streams.
The next two kings, Aethelred and Cenred son of Wulfhere, are better known for their religious activities; the king who succeeded them (in 709), Ceolred, is said in a letter of Saint Boniface to have been a dissolute youth who died insane.
The Danes drove Burgred, the last king of Mercia from his kingdom in 874 and in 886, the eastern part of the kingdom became part of the Danelaw, while the western portion was occupied by Wessex.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Mercia   (1211 words)

  
 Mercia
Mercia was one of the kingdoms of the Heptarchy, in what is now England, in the region of the Midlands.
A revolt in 657 resulted with the appearance of another son of Penda, Wulfhere[?], who ruled Mercia until he was defeated and killed in an invasion of Northumbria in 674.
Mercia soon returned to the rule of her own king, but its days as the leading power of England had passed.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/me/Mercia.html   (676 words)

  
 Aethelred of Mercia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Æthelred (died 716) was King of Mercia from 675 to 704.
In a battle on the banks of the Trent in 679, the king of Mercia was victorious and regained the province.
Osthryth was murdered in 697 and Æthelred abdicated in 704, choosing Wulfhere's son Cenred as his successor.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aethelred_of_Mercia   (256 words)

  
 Mercia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint.
Mercia (Old English Mierce – "border people") was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy, centred on the valley of the River Trent and its tributaries in what is now the Midlands of England.
The term survives today in the name of the West Mercia Constabulary, commercial radio station Mercia FM in Coventry, and also in that of the new British Army infantry regiment, the Mercian Regiment.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mercia   (1334 words)

  
 Mercia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Mercia was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy, in what is now England, in the region of the Midlands.
The earliest known king of Mercia was named Creoda, said to be the son of Ici.
The next two kings, Aethelred and Cenred son of Wulfhere, are better known for their religious activities.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/m/me/mercia.html   (866 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Mercia's neighbours included Northumbria, kingdom of Powys, the kingdoms of southern Wales, Wessex, Kingdom of Sussex, Kingdom of Essex, and East Anglia.
The next two kings, Aethelred of Mercia and Cenred of Mercia son of Wulfhere, are better known for their religious activities; the king who succeeded them (in 709), Ceolred of Mercia, is said in a letter of Saint Boniface to have been a dissolute youth who died insane.
The Danes appointed a Mercian thegn, Ceolwulf II of Mercia, as king in 873 while the remaining independent section of Mercia was ruled by Earl Aethelred of Mercia, called an ealderman, not a king.
fileeirs.info /en/Mercia   (1303 words)

  
 Mercia - Cunnan
Mercia was one of the pre-Conquest Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England.
Its centre was in the valley of the River Trent, and its tributaries, but later it grew to extend from the Humber to the Thames, and west to the borders of Wales.
Later, in 853, the kingdoms allied to "conquer" North Wales, and the Mercian king married the daughter of Ethelwulf, King of the West Saxons.
cunnan.sca.org.au /wiki/Mercia   (535 words)

  
 Ceolred of Mercia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ceolred (died 716) was King of Mercia from 709 to 716.
He was a son of Aethelred and became king following the abdication of his predecessor, Cenred.
He was known for his mistreatment of the Church and, probably in large part because of this, the histories of the period leave a very negative portrayal of him, recording him as a cruel and wicked sinner.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ceolred_of_Mercia   (180 words)

  
 The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 702-799
Forthere succeeded to Aldhelm; and Ceolred succeeded to the kingdom of Mercia.
And Cenred went to Rome; and Offa with him.
On the death of Archbishop Nothelm, Cuthbert was consecrated archbishop, and Dunn, Bishop of Rochester.
www.chrisbutterworth.com /hist/asc0702.htm   (3378 words)

  
 Mercia info here at en.89of100e.info   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Our Featured Mercia column on Mercia Category: Mercia The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest breadth (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the embryonic import location (6th century) liable a darker tint.
Mercia (Old English Mierce – "border people") was peculiar of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy, centred on the valley of the River Trent 'n its tributaries in right away the Midlands of England.
The proximate two kings, Aethelred 'n Cenred son of Wulfhere, are better well-known for their religious activities; the crowned head who succeeded them (in 709), Ceolred, is said in a small letter of Saint Boniface to have anachronistic a dissolute youth who died insane.
en.89of100e.info /Mercia   (1446 words)

  
 Mercia
Mercia's influence probably reached its zenith during the reign of Offa in the latter half of the 8th century.
To the north was the frontier between Mercia and Gwynedd, and to the south between Mercia and Ercing and Gwent.
In 903, the East Anglian Danes ransacked Mercia and northern Wessex, incited by the rebel Æthelwold, cousin of Edward (Alfred's son and successor).
www.stephen.j.murray.btinternet.co.uk /mercia.htm   (12269 words)

  
 Kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxons - Iclingas & Mercians
Mercia is by now recognised as the overlord of the Ciltern Saxons and the Suther-ge.
By this time, Mercia had absorbed the Saxon kingdoms of the Wrocenset and Magonset (occupying the rest of the territory of former British Pengwern) to the west, and much of the Middle Angles to the east.
On the death of Queen Aethelflaed, control of Mercia passes to her brother, Edward, King of Wessex.
www.kessler-web.co.uk /History/KingListsBritain/EnglandMercia.htm   (686 words)

  
 Mercia info here at en.25of100b.info   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Mercia (Old English Mierce – "border people") was definite of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy, centred on the valley of the River Trent & its tributaries in instanter the Midlands of England.
The adjoining two kings, Aethelred & Cenred son of Wulfhere, are better confessed for their religious activities; the czar who succeeded them (in 709), Ceolred, is said in a of Saint Boniface to have anachronistic a dissolute youth who died insane.
The adjoining sizable czar of Mercia was Æthelbald (716 - 757).
en.25of100b.info /Mercia   (1552 words)

  
 Mercia info here at en.38of100d.info   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Our Featured Mercia on Mercia Category: Mercia The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest term (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the commencing amount width (6th century) accustomed a darker tint.
The main Mercia is Old English for "boundary folk" (see marches), and the sanctioned interpretation was that the kingdom originated forth the frontier mid the Welsh and the Anglo-Saxon invaders, much as P.
The subsequent two kings, Aethelred and Cenred son of Wulfhere, are better for their religious activities; the khan who succeeded them (in 709), Ceolred, is said in a cap of Saint Boniface to have versed hat a dissolute youth who died insane.
en.38of100d.info /Mercia   (1465 words)

  
 The History Bookshop
He is the last of the descendants of King Penda to rule Mercia.
This is probably a defeat for Mercia allowing both Kent and Sussex temporarily to regain their independence.
793: Offa of Mercia commands the construction of a cathedral at St Albans.
www.historybookshop.com /timelines/anglo-saxon-eng-700-849.htm   (2097 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: 704   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Cenred succeeds to the throne of Mercia, sometimes spelled Mierce, was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy, in what is now England, in the region of the Midlands, with its heart in the valley of the River Trent and its tributary streams.
Mercias neighbours included Northumbria, Powys, the kingdoms of southern Wales...
Mercia after his uncle For the later earl, see Earl Aethelred of Mercia.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/704   (632 words)

  
 Mercia dgun.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The Anglo-Saxons were originally a collection of differing Germanic tribes from Angeln—a peninsula in the southern part of Schleswig, protruding into the Baltic Sea, and what is now Lower Saxony, in the north-west coast of Germany—who achieved dominance in southern Britain from the mid-5th century.
It is generally believed to have arisen from the union of six of the seven kingdoms of the Heptarchy under Alfred in 886.
The name Mercia may mean "marches" and be related to the name of the River Mersey: a frontier area facing the Celtic Romano-British or Welsh.
mercia.en.dgun.org   (13826 words)

  
 Twickenham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The area was first mentioned in a charter of 13 June 704 AD (as 'Tuican hom' and 'Tuiccanham') to cede the area to Waldhere, Bishop of London, 'for the salvation of our souls.' The charter is signed with 12 crosses.
The signaturies included Swaefred of Essex, Cenred of Mercia, and Earl Paeogthath.
The manor had belonged to Ælfgar, Earl of Mercia in the time of Edward the Confessor, but was granted to Walter de Saint-Valery (Waleric) by William I of England after the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Twickenham   (1408 words)

  
 Mercia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Mercia's neighbors included Northumbria, Powys, the kingdoms of southern Wales, Wessex, Sussex, Essex, and East Anglia.
Offa exerted himself to ensure that his son Ecgfrith would succeed him, but after his death in July 796, Ecgfrith survived for only five more months, and the kingdom passed to a distant relative named Coenwulf in December 796.
This hidage exists in several manuscript versions, some as late as the 14th century; it lists a number of peoples who have vanished, except for reminders in various place names.
home.comcast.net /~desilva22/Mercia.htm   (931 words)

  
 Electronic Sawyer: Early Rulers of the Mercians (S 67-81)
A.D. Cenred, king of Mercia, to Ecgwine, bishop of the Hwicce, for his church at Cronuchomme (Evesham); grant of 5 hides (cassati) at Abbots Morton, Worcs.
A.D. Cenred, king of Mercia, and Offa, ruler of the East Angles, to the monastery at Evesham; confirmation of 67 hides (mansae) at Evesham, Lenchwick, Norton, Offenham, Littleton, Aldington, Badsey, Bretforton, Church Honeybourne, Willersey, Wickhamford, Bengeworth, Hampton, and at Abbots Morton, all in Worcs.
Cenred, king of Mercia, renews the sanctio of Æthelberht, king (of Kent), in favour of St Paul's, London.
www.trin.cam.ac.uk /chartwww/eSawyer.99/S%2067-81.html   (1360 words)

  
 The Avalon Project : The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle : Eighth Century
A.D. This year Ethelred, the son of Penda, King of Mercia, entered into a monastic life, having reigned twenty-nine winters; and Cenred succeeded to the government.
A.D. This year Offa, King of Mercia, commanded that King Ethelbert should be beheaded; and Osred, who had been king of the Northumbrians, returning home after his exile, was apprehended and slain, on the eighteenth day before the calends of October.
About the same time Cynewulf, King of Mercia, made inroads upon the inhabitants of Kent as far as the marsh; and the Mercians seized Edbert Pryn, their king, led him bound into Mercia, and suffered men to pick out his eyes, and cut off his hands.
www.yale.edu /lawweb/avalon/angsax/ang08.htm   (3723 words)

  
 Chapter 5: Anglo-Saxon Mercia
The area occupied by the Hwiccii later formed one of the five earldoms of the kingdom of Mercia.
Mercia occupied the upper basin of the Trent River and later almost all of southern England.
Wybba, son of Creoda, was the second king of Mercia.
www.phancocks.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk /localhistory/anglsxns.htm   (2100 words)

  
 thePeerage.com - Arthur Charles Newton and others
     Æthelred I, King of Mercia was the son of Penda, King of Mercia and Cynewise.
     Cenred, King of Mercia was the son of Wulfhere, King of Mercia.
     Ceolred, King of Mercia was the son of Æthelred I, King of Mercia and Osthryth.
www.thepeerage.com /p15035.htm   (791 words)

  
 Cenred of Mercia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Cenred (or Coenred, Coinred, Kenred) ruled the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia from 704 to 709.
According to Bede, Cenred abdicated in favor of Aethelred's son Ceolred after four years, went with Offa (said to be a West Saxon ruler) to Rome and was made a monk by Pope Constantine.
This page was last modified 23:59, 8 Jul 2004.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Cenred_of_Mercia   (157 words)

  
 Cenred of Mercia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
King of Mercia (reigned 704-709); date of birth and death unknown.
This diocese took its rise in the conversion of Mercia by St. Cedd and his three companions in 652 and subsequent years.
Geography, acendancy, and decline of the Kingdom of Mercia, and the earldom as it existed under the Danelaw.
www.omniknow.com /common/wiki.php?in=en&term=Cenred   (1103 words)

  
 Cenred of Mercia - TheBestLinks.com - Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Bede, London, ...
Cenred of Mercia - TheBestLinks.com - Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Bede, London,...
Cenred of Mercia, Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Bede, London, Rome, 709...
You can add this article to your own "watchlist" and receive e-mail notification about all changes in this page.
www.thebestlinks.com /Cenred_of_Mercia.html   (181 words)

  
 Britannia: The AngloSaxon Chronicle   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Aldhelm; and Ceolred succeeded to the kingdom of Mercia.
Cenred then succeeded to the government, and held it
Cliff's-Hoo; and there was Ethelbald, king of Mercia, with
www.britannia.com /history/docs/702-50.html   (894 words)

  
 Early English Kings
Kent was an independent kingdom, but king Edbert (k016) was deposed by the Mercian king Cenwulf (m012) in 798 and the country was ruled by Mercians until Wessex united Kent and Wessex in 825 or 827.
Mercia was founded in 626 and came under Northumbrian sovereignty from 655 to 658.
Mercia united with Wessex in 918 or 919.
www.jmarcussen.dk /historie/reference/englandold.html   (1828 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.