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Topic: Census Metropolitan Area


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  BC STATS: 1996 Census: Definitions
A census agglomeration (CA) is a large urban area (UA) (known as the urban core) together with adjacent urban and rural areas (known as urban and rural fringes) that have a high degree of social and economic integration with the urban core.
A census metropolitan area (CMA) is a very large urban area (known as the urban core) together with adjacent urban and rural areas (known as urban and rural fringes) that have a high degree of social and economic integration with the urban core.
A census agglomeration that is a component of a consolidated census metropolitan area or consolidated census agglomeration is referred to as the primary census agglomeration (PCA).
www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca /data/cen96/c96defs.asp   (1646 words)

  
 census metropolitan area (cma) and census agglomeration (ca), 2001 census   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The census population count of the urban core is at least 10,000 to form a census agglomeration and at least 100,000 to form a census metropolitan area.
The urban areas in the CMA or CA that are not contiguous to the urban core are called the urban fringe.
CMAs were delineated around cities with a population of at least 50,000, if the population density and labour force composition criteria were met, and the total CMA population was at least 100,000.
www12.statcan.ca /english/census01/Products/Reference/dict/geo009.htm   (2542 words)

  
 Chapter I - Census Geography
An enumeration area is the area canvassed by one census representative.
For such areas to be eligible for consolidation, the total commuting interchange between the particular CMAs and CAs must be equal to at least 35% of the labour force living in the smaller CMA or CA.
An agricultural region is a subprovincial geographic region used by the census of agriculture in the dissemination of agricultural statistics.
www.ucalgary.ca /~libdata/adc/geo.html   (2591 words)

  
 - DMTI Spatial - {Census Demographic Boundaries}   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Census Subdivision is the term applied to municipalities (as determined by provincial legislation) or their equivalent (for example, Indian Reserves, Indian settlements and unorganized territories).
Census Division is the term applied to areas established by provincial law which are intermediate geographic areas between the municipality (Census Subdivision) and the province level.
The Census Metropolitan Area, as well as the Census Agglomeration is a very large urban area (urban core) together with adjacent urban and rural areas that have a high degree of social and economic integration with the urban core.
www.dmtispatial.com /census_boundaries.htm   (296 words)

  
 census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones (miz), 2001 census   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (MIZ) is a concept that geographically differentiates the area of Canada outside census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and census agglomerations (CAs).
Census subdivisions outside CMAs and CAs are assigned to one of four categories according to the degree of influence (strong, moderate, weak or no influence) that the CMAs and/or CAs have on them.
Census subdivisions (CSDs) are assigned to a MIZ category based on the percentage of their resident employed labour force that has a place of work in the urban core(s) of CMAs or CAs.
www12.statcan.ca /english/census01/Products/Reference/dict/geo010.htm   (758 words)

  
 United States metropolitan area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The counties containing the core urbanized area are known as the central counties of the MSA.
As of June 2003, there is now an additional classification, that of a “Metropolitan Division.” The term metropolitan division is used to refer to a county or group of closely-tied contiguous counties that serve as a distinct employment region within a metropolitan statistical area that has a population core of at least 2.5 million.
While a metropolitan division is a subdivision of a larger metropolitan statistical area, it often functions as a distinct social, economic, and cultural area within the larger region.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/United_States_metropolitan_area   (522 words)

  
 Census 96 Geog Abbrev
consolidated Toronto CMA is composed of the Toronto PCMA and the PCAs of Georgina, Milton,
Land area refers to the area in square kilometres of the land-based portions of the census geographic areas.
A census metropolitan area that is a component of a consolidated census metropolitan area is referred to as a primary census metropolitan area (PCMA).
tdr.tug-libraries.on.ca /GEOG/abbrev96.htm   (1809 words)

  
 Census geographic units of Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Census divisions correspond with regional districts or municipalities.
CMAs and CAs with a population greater than 50,000 are subdivided into census tracts which have populations ranging from 2,000 to 8,000.
Census divisions of Alberta · Newfoundland and Labrador · Ontario · Saskatchewan
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Census_Metropolitan_Area   (629 words)

  
 Canadian Business Patterns: Establishment Counts by Census Agglomeration / Census Metropolitan Area
Census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are standard units created to present statistics for the largest urban centres in Canada.
A census metropolitan area is delineated around an urban area (urbanized core having a population of at least 100,000, based on the previous census).
A census agglomeration is based on smaller urban areas, centred on urbanized cores of a population of at least 10,000.
datalib.library.ualberta.ca /data/cbp/datacbpbycacma.htm   (224 words)

  
 Home
However, once an area becomes a CMA, it is retained as a CMA even if the population of its urban core declines below 100,000…When a CA has an urban core of at least 50,000 based on census counts, it is subdivided into census tracts.
Census Tract (CT): “small, relatively stable geographic areas that usually have a population of 2,500 to 8,000.
They are located in census metropolitan areas and in census agglomerations with an urban core population of 50,000 or more in the previous census.
www.geog.ubc.ca /metropolis/atlas2001/definitions.html   (571 words)

  
 Glossary
The general concept of a census metropolitan area (CMA) is one of a very large urban area, together with adjacent urban and rural areas which have a high degree of economic and social integration with that urban area.
A CMA is delineated around an urban area (called the urban core and having a population of at least 100,000, based on the previous census).
Below is a table of population for the census metropolitan areas of Canada in the years 1996 and 1998.
shazam.econ.ubc.ca /UBCuser/statcan2.htm   (258 words)

  
 1991 and 1996 Census Definitions: Urban Area
The delineation of urban areas is based primarily on an analysis of population concentration and population density.
In areas where significant population growth or decline has occurred since the previous census, the designation of an area as urban or rural may no longer reflect its current population or population density, and its delineation may no longer conform to the current limits of the densely populated area.
The name of the urban area is the name of the principal CSD when the CSD is a city, town or village, and at least 75% of the CSD population is within the urban area.
www.umanitoba.ca /centres/mchp/concept/dict/urban_91_96.html   (1803 words)

  
 Resource Reference Sheet - Metropolitan Statistical Areas
The term "metropolitan areas" is used to generally describe an area containing a large population center and adjacent communities that have a high degree of integration with that population center.
Metropolitan area standards from the 1980s and 1990s established areas known as Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), Primary Metropolitan Statistical Areas (PMSAs) and Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Areas (CMSAs).
While metropolitan area is a general concept in the OMB process, a Metropolitan Statistical Area is a specific area that may be defined using the OMB standards.
census.state.nc.us /glossary/msa.html   (863 words)

  
 Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas
Metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (metro and micro areas) are geographic entities defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for use by Federal statistical agencies in collecting, tabulating, and publishing Federal statistics.
Each metro or micro area consists of one or more counties and includes the counties containing the core urban area, as well as any adjacent counties that have a high degree of social and economic integration (as measured by commuting to work) with the urban core.
In defining metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas, OMB does not attempt to anticipate or take into account any nonstatistical uses that may be made of the definitions, nor will OMB modify the definitions to meet the requirements of any nonstatistical program.
www.census.gov /population/www/estimates/metroarea.html   (462 words)

  
 QuickFacts: Metropolitan Statistical Area   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
New areas usually are added annually; definitions of existing areas updated only after each decennial census, in years ending in 3.
The general concept of a metropolitan area is that of a large population nucleus, together with adjacent communities having a high degree of social and economic integration with that core.
Metropolitan areas comprise one or more entire counties, except in New England, where cities and towns are the basic geographic units.
quickfacts.census.gov /qfd/meta/long_metro.htm   (150 words)

  
 CIBC World Markets - Economics & Strategy - Metropolitan Economic Activity
Using 9 key macroeconomic variables, we have developed a metropolitan index of economic activity, which is structured in a way that approximates the change in each city's level of economic activity.
According to Statistics Canada, a census metropolitan area is delineated around an urban area (urbanized core having a population of at least 100,000, based on the previous census).
Once an area becomes a census metropolitan area, it is retained as a census metropolitan area even if its population subsequently declines.
research.cibcwm.com /res/Eco/ArEcoMEA.html   (332 words)

  
 CIC Canada | Recent Immigrants in Metropolitan Areas: Québec—A Comparative Profile Based on the ...
According to the 2001 Census, there were 19,700 immigrants living in the Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) of Québec (that is, the Québec Census Metropolitan Area or Québec for short) in 2001.
Between the 1996 Census and the 2001 Census, the number of immigrants in the Québec CMA increased by 2,300 or 13%.
Figure A-2: Immigrants residing in Québec Census Metropolitan Area as a percentage of Canada’s and the province of Quebec’s immigrant population, by period of immigration, 2001
www.cic.gc.ca /english/research/papers/census2001/quebec/parta.html   (1312 words)

  
 Canadian Census Data   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
PCensus databases contain 1,851 census variables aggregated at the enumeration area, census tract, census subdivision, census metropolitan area, province and postal FSA levels.
In addition, values in enumeration areas with unusually small populations may be suppressed entirely.
Census data are also available for individual Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs); e.g.
www.tetrad.com /pricing/can/cn91.html   (139 words)

  
 Census of Canada, 1986: Geographic Reference Files
The 1981-1986 enumeration area correspondence file provides a table of the relationship between the 1981 EA structure to the 1986 EA structure, as determined by the spatial coverage of the two structures.
The 1986-1991 enumeration area correspondence file provides a table of the relationship between the 1986 EA structure to the 1991 EA structure, as determined by the spatial coverage of the two structures.
All data reported for census subdivisions are based on the boundaries in effect on January 1, 1986 providd that the information and documentation regarding these boundaries were in the hands of Census by March 1, 1986.
www.chass.utoronto.ca /datalib/cc86/cc86gref.htm   (582 words)

  
 Census 2000 - Public Documents and Maps Dept. - Perkins Library - Duke U.
The Census 2000 Supplementary Survey is a Decennial Census program designed to demonstrate the feasibility of collecting long form type information at the same time as, but separate from, the Decennial Census.
Economic, demographic, and housing characteristics from the Census 2000 Supplementary Survey are reported for the United States as a whole, the 50 states, and the District of Columbia.
It is a cooperative program between the states and the Census Bureau that was created in 1978 to make data available locally to the public through a network of state agencies, universities, libraries, and regional and local governments.
docs.lib.duke.edu /data/guides/cen2k.htm   (1709 words)

  
 Employment Insurance Regulations - Schedule I - Regions - Ontario   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
(1) The region of Ottawa, consisting of the portion of the Census Metropolitan Area of Ottawa—Hull that lies in the Province of Ontario.
     (6)  The region of Hamilton, consisting of the Census Metropolitan Area of Hamilton.
     (10) The region of Windsor, consisting of the Census Metropolitan Area of Windsor.
www.hrsdc.gc.ca /en/ei/legislation/ei_regs_sched_I_ontario.shtml   (520 words)

  
 Census 2000: A Guide to Demographic Information
Census 2000 results for the region are also available.
Illinois’ lead agency in a network of state agencies, universities, libraries and regional and local governments whose mission is to make census data available locally to the public.
Covering a 24-county region including the Chicago metropolitan area, NIBIDC offers data services and products as well as an extensive Web-accessible library of economic and demographic statistics.
www.skokie.lib.il.us /s_info/in_government/in_gv_census   (302 words)

  
 Census Geography - Census Metropolitan Area/Census Agglomeration - Tutorial
Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) and Census Agglomeration (CA)
Metropolitan area is a general term used to refer to census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.
Areas outside metropolitan areas are classified into two categories: metropolitan influenced zones (MIZ) and territories.
geodepot.statcan.ca /Diss/Reference/Tutorial/CMA_tut1_e.cfm   (48 words)

  
 Local Area Unemployment Statistics Home Page
This was superseded on February 18, 2004, by the issuance of a new bulletin—No. 04-03—that reflected, among other things, a re-application of the new standards using population estimates for 2001 and 2002.
New England City and Town Areas (NECTAs) also were defined as an alternative to the county-based metropolitan and micropolitan areas in the 6 New England states.
The Office of Management and Budget is responsible for maintaining and updating statistical area classifications, a task it has done every decade since the 1950 Census.
www.bls.gov /lau/lausmsa.htm   (453 words)

  
 Audit Bureau of Circulations - Bylaws & Rules
The newspaper designated market of a newspaper member is considered to be that geographical area which is considered to be the market served by the newspaper.
If MSA or CMA totals are shown in an Audit Report, the same figures may be repeated in the explanatory paragraph of subsequent Publisher's Statements at the option of the publisher.
A paper delivered regularly by newspaper employee, agent or independent contractor or via the postal service into the home, or office, or other place of business and paid for in accord with C 1.1 and C 1.2 shall be classed as "Home Delivery," in Bureau Reports.
www.accessabc.com /bylaws/bylaw2423_7.htm   (3629 words)

  
 Census Metropolitan Area/Census Agglomeration Boundaries (CMA/CA) - Overview   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The Census Subdivisions (municipalities) that make-up a CMA must have a high degree of economic and social integration with the 'urbanized core'.
The U.S. equivalent to a CMA/CA is a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA).
Both CMA and CA geographic areas are defined by Statistics Canada.
extranet.mapinfo.com /products/Overview.cfm?productid=38   (162 words)

  
 Census of Canada, 1996: profile files
Census of Canada, 1996: profile of census tracts - CMA Toronto subset.
Part 1: age and sex and families data: population 1991 and 1996, land area, population by sex and age groups, legal marital status, census families by structure, lone-parent families by sex of parent, never-married sons and/or daughters, persons in private households, persons 65 and over, occupied private dwellings by structure, households by household size.
Subfile part 1, however, contains 665 census metropolitan areas, census tracted census agglomerations, and census subdivisions.
www.chass.utoronto.ca /datalib/cc96/profil96.htm   (407 words)

  
 [No title]
Data from the 1991 Census are available for numerous standard geographic areas, as well as for non-standard or user- defined areas.
Census data can also be produced for areas other than the standard geographic areas, that is, for user- defined areas.
if the commuting flow is less than 100 persons, CSDs are excluded from the CMA, even if the second or third criteria apply; even if the second, third, fourth or fifth criteria apply, CSDs may be included or excluded to maintain the contiguity of the CMA.
www.ucalgary.ca /~landru/adc/geo.html   (2613 words)

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