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Topic: Central lymph nodes


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 the Trocar :: Online Videojournal of Gynecologic and surgical endoscopy
Dissection of the lymph nodes follows the path of the saphenous vein, starting from the lowest part and moving up past the arch to the area where are lying the lymph nodes situated at the confluence of the external pudendal veins, the superficial epigastric vein, and the superficial circumflex vein.
The dissection was performed on the ipsilateral side of the tumor in 9 patients, on contra lateral side in 6 cases (in case of clinically suspected inguinal nodes a traditional open dissection was performed) and on both sides in the 13 patients with central disease.
The nodes primarily involved are the superficial inguinal lymph nodes (Andrews, et al., 1994).
www.thetrocar.net /view.asp?id=1   (2709 words)

  
 Lymph Nodes
All lymph nodes have the primary function of the production of lymphocytes, which help defend the body against microorganisms and against harmful foreign particles and debris from lymph before it is returned to the blood stream.
Hodgkin's disease is an enlargement of the lymph nodes in the neck, which gradually spreads throughout the lymphatic system, including the spleen.
Lymph nodes generally occur in groups along the larger lymphatic vessels.
www.innerbody.com /text/lymp05.html   (174 words)

  
 Myocytes of Lymph Vessels and Nodes
Spiral orientation of myocytes is an optimal one for modification of lymphangion shape in the process of contraction and for pulse lymph transition from peripheral lymphangion to the central one.
Attempt of researches to refer indicated layers to tunics of vessel by analogy with blood vessels (arteries and veins) does not have sufficient grounds as practically there is no bounds (elastic membranes) between tunics of lymph vessel.
Orientation of myocytes in the vessel wall is of interest for understanding the pulse transition of lymph from one lymphangion to another.
lymphbiology.tamu.edu /myocytes.html   (2888 words)

  
 The Lymphatic System as a drainage system
Lymph capillaries branch and interconnect freely and extend into almost all tissues of the body except the CNS (Central Nervous System) and the avascular tissues such as the epidermis and the cartilage.
The technique is also used to locate lymph nodes for radiation therapy or for surgical removal.
Lymphatics from the lower portion of the body converge to form a dilated lymph vessel, the cisterna chyli, in the lumbar region of the abdominal cavity.
www.jdaross.mcmail.com /lymphatics2.htm   (711 words)

  
 Basic Information on the Lymph System
Your lymph system is only one of many important systems in your body, i.e., the central nervous system, the digestive system, the blood system, etc..
As the lymph flows through the lymph vessels, it occasionally encounters lymph nodes or lymph glands which filter the fluid and rid it of excess protein and foreign matter that had been picked up along the way.
The lymph system is actually quite similar to the blood system in its use of vessels, but instead of blood, the lymph vessels contain lymph fluid.
lymphedema.articleinsider.com /164007_lymph_system.html   (711 words)

  
 Medmicro Chapter 1a
The system consists of 1) monocytes in the blood, 2) macrophages in the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, thymus, bone marrow, connective tissues, and submucosal tissues of the respiratory and alimentary tracts, 3) dendritic cells in lymph nodes, 4) Langerhans cells in skin, and 4) glial cells in the central nervous system.
The lymphoid system is divided into 1) central lymphoid organs, the thymus and bone marrow, and 2) peripheral lymphoid organs, lymph nodes, the spleen, and mucosal and submucosal tissues of the alimentary and respiratory tracts.
The system is divided into a) central lymphoid organs, the thymus and bone marrow, and b) peripheral lymphoid organs including lymph nodes, spleen, and the mucosa/submucosa of the respiratory and alimentary tracts (Fig.
gsbs.utmb.edu /microbook/ch001a.htm   (3982 words)

  
 The Lymphatic System as a drainage system
Lymphatics leaving lymph nodes are called efferent lymph vessels and conduct lymph toward the shoulder region.
Lymph capillaries branch and interconnect freely and extend into almost all tissues of the body except the CNS (Central Nervous System) and the avascular tissues such as the epidermis and the cartilage.
Lymphatics from the lower portion of the body converge to form a dilated lymph vessel, the cisterna chyli, in the lumbar region of the abdominal cavity.
www.jdaross.mcmail.com /lymphatics2.htm   (711 words)

  
 Medmicro Chapter 1a
The lymphoid system is divided into 1) central lymphoid organs, the thymus and bone marrow, and 2) peripheral lymphoid organs, lymph nodes, the spleen, and mucosal and submucosal tissues of the alimentary and respiratory tracts.
The system is divided into a) central lymphoid organs, the thymus and bone marrow, and b) peripheral lymphoid organs including lymph nodes, spleen, and the mucosa/submucosa of the respiratory and alimentary tracts (Fig.
Lymphocytes differentiate into three separate lines: thymic-dependent cells or T lymphocytes that operate in cellular and humoral immunity, B lymphocytes that differentiate into plasma cells to secrete antibodies, and natural killer (NK) cells.
gsbs.utmb.edu /microbook/ch001a.htm   (3982 words)

  
 National Cancer Institute - Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment
Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lymph tissue of the brain and/or spinal cord.
The lymph system is part of the immune system and is made up of the lymph, lymph vessels, lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, tonsils, and bone marrow.
For primary CNS lymphoma, a CT scan is done of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis (the part of the body between the hips).
www.cancer.gov /cancerinfo/pdq/treatment/primary-CNS-lymphoma/patient   (961 words)

  
 Abdomen Terms
Lymphatic drainage: intermediate colic lymph nodes, then the inferior mesenteric lymph nodes
Passes through the opening for the inferior vena cava in the central tendon of the diaphram at the level of T8, and enters R. atrium of heart.
The inferior gluteal artery is a branch of the anterior division of the internal iliac artery, it leaves the pelvis through the inferior part of the greater sciatic foramen, goes inferior to piriformis muscle and serves the muscles and skin of the inferior buttock and posterior thigh.
umed.med.utah.edu /ms1/anatomy/study/ab_defined.html   (8056 words)

  
 Crossdress Transsexual Transvestite
In the thousands of years that humans have spent constructing clothing, they have created an astonishing array of styles, many of which we can reconstruct from surviving garments, photos, paintings, mosaics, etc. These drain to the central axillary crossdress transsexual transvestite lymph nodes, then to the apical axillary lymph nodes.
Thus affirmative action and BEE are job reservation and empowerment programs for Black African, Indian and Coloured people, despite BEE for instance specifically being called "Black Economic Empowerment".
This article is about the color black; for other uses, see Black (disambiguation).
transsexual.webeve.com /crossdress-transsexual-transvestite.html   (817 words)

  
 Superior Vena Cava Syndrome - Lungs: pulmonary and respiratory health and medical information produced by doctors
Compression by disease of any of the structures or lymph nodes surrounding the superior vena cava can cause the superior vena cava syndrome.
The superior vena cava is located in the middle of the chest and is surrounded by rigid structures and lymph nodes.
Non-cancer causes of the superior vena cava syndrome include infections (such as tuberculosis, fungus, and syphilis), benign tumors (such as teratomas, thymoma, dermoid cyst), aortic aneurysm, pericarditis, sarcoidosis, irradiation treatment to the chest, air in the chest (pneumothorax), and complication of central line catheters and congenital heart surgery.
www.medicinenet.com /superior_vena_cava_syndrome/article.htm   (634 words)

  
 MedlineIntranasalAdministrationofInterferonBeta.html
Intranasal administration of interferon beta bypasses the blood-brain barrier to target the central nervous system and cervical lymph nodes: a non-invasive treatment strategy for multiple sclerosis
Intranasal administration offers a non-invasive method of drug delivery for multiple sclerosis (MS) that bypasses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and directly targets the CNS and lymph nodes.
Ross TM, Martinez PM, Renner JC, Thorne RG, Hanson LR, Frey WH 2nd.
www.mult-sclerosis.org /news/May2004/MedlineIntranasalAdministrationofInterferonBeta.html   (634 words)

  
 eMedicine - Typhoid Fever : Article by Roberto Corales, DO
Caused by S typhi and occurring only in humans, typhoid fever is a severe multisystemic illness characterized by the classic prolonged fever, sustained bacteremia without endothelial or endocardial involvement, and bacterial invasion of and multiplication within the mononuclear phagocytic cells of the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer patches.
Pathophysiology: The hallmark of typhoid fever is the invasion of and multiplication within the mononuclear phagocytic cells in the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer patches of the ileum.
Typhoid and paratyphoid fevers are endemic in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast and Far East Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Central America, and South America.
www.emedicine.com /MED/topic2331.htm   (7623 words)

  
 Superior Vena Cava Syndrome - Lungs: pulmonary and respiratory health and medical information produced by doctors
The superior vena cava is located in the middle of the chest and is surrounded by rigid structures and lymph nodes.
The common forms of cancer that can cause the superior vena cava syndrome are lung cancer, lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes), and cancer that has spread (metastasis) to the chest, more commonly breast and testicular cancer.
Non-cancer causes of the superior vena cava syndrome include infections (such as tuberculosis, fungus, and syphilis), benign tumors (such as teratomas, thymoma, dermoid cyst), aortic aneurysm, pericarditis, sarcoidosis, irradiation treatment to the chest, air in the chest (pneumothorax), and complication of central line catheters and congenital heart surgery.
www.medicinenet.com /superior_vena_cava_syndrome/article.htm   (617 words)

  
 Superior vena cava syndrome definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms
The superior vena cava is located in the middle of the chest and is surrounded by rigid structures and lymph nodes.
The common forms of cancer that can cause the superior vena cava syndrome are lung cancer, lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes), and cancer that has spread (metastasis) to the chest, more commonly breast and testicular cancer.
Non-cancer causes of the superior vena cava syndrome include infections (such as tuberculosis, fungus, and syphilis), benign tumors (such as teratomas, thymoma, dermoid cyst), aortic aneurysm, pericarditis, sarcoidosis, irradiation treatment to the chest, air in the chest (pneumothorax), and complication of central line catheters and congenital heart surgery.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=8329   (516 words)

  
 Superior Vena Cava Syndrome - Lungs: pulmonary and respiratory health and medical information produced by doctors
The superior vena cava is located in the middle of the chest and is surrounded by rigid structures and lymph nodes.
The common forms of cancer that can cause the superior vena cava syndrome are lung cancer, lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes), and cancer that has spread (metastasis) to the chest, more commonly breast and testicular cancer.
Non-cancer causes of the superior vena cava syndrome include infections (such as tuberculosis, fungus, and syphilis), benign tumors (such as teratomas, thymoma, dermoid cyst), aortic aneurysm, pericarditis, sarcoidosis, irradiation treatment to the chest, air in the chest (pneumothorax), and complication of central line catheters and congenital heart surgery.
www.medicinenet.com /superior_vena_cava_syndrome/article.htm   (617 words)

  
 Integumentary system (from human embryology) --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The major parts of the system are the lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, spleen, and lymphatic vessels; additional lymphatic tissue is found in isolated patches in the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and bone marrow.
As with other higher vertebrates, the human nervous system has two main parts: the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral nervous system (the nerves that carry impulses to and from the central nervous...
The human digestive system consists primarily of the digestive tract, or the series of structures and organs through which food and liquids pass during their processing into forms absorbable into the bloodstream.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-63801   (703 words)

  
 CHEST: Severe Immune Hemolytic Anemia in Disseminated Tuberculosis With Response to Antituberculosis Therapy - )
Antituberculosis therapy was maintained until January 1998 when the patient's neck lymph nodes were determined to be almost impalpable.
Granulomatous inflammation with caseous necrosis was identified in both the lymph node and bone marrow biopsy specimens, with numerous acid-fast bacili present in the former.
For infection-associated hemolytic anemia, immediate initiation of an appropriate antimicrobial therapy is of central importance and may be life-saving.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0984/is_6_119/ai_76427047   (703 words)

  
 The Lymphatic System as a drainage system
Lymph capillaries branch and interconnect freely and extend into almost all tissues of the body except the CNS (Central Nervous System) and the avascular tissues such as the epidermis and the cartilage.
The fluid is left in the system for 24 hours and the lymph nodes can then be observed by X-rays.
At the junction of the thoracic duct and the venous system, a valve prevents blood from flowing backward into the duct.
www.jdaross.mcmail.com /lymphatics2.htm   (703 words)

  
 Peripheral nervous system (from human embryology) --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The major parts of the system are the lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, spleen, and lymphatic vessels; additional lymphatic tissue is found in isolated patches in the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and bone marrow.
As with other higher vertebrates, the human nervous system has two main parts: the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral nervous system (the nerves that carry impulses to and from the central nervous...
The sympathetic nervous system connects the internal organs to the brain by spinal nerves.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-63808   (818 words)

  
 Kawasaki -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article
Additionally (An acute disease of young children characterized by a rash and swollen lymph nodes and fever; of unknown cause) Kawasaki disease is (A disease of the heart or blood vessels) cardiovascular disease found primarily in young children, first described by Dr Tomisaku Kawasaki.
(additional info and facts about Kawasaki, Kanagawa) Kawasaki, Kanagawa - a Japanese city located between (The capital and largest city of Japan; the economic and cultural center of Japan) Tokyo and (Port city on southeastern Honshu in central Japan) Yokohama
(additional info and facts about Kawasaki Frontale) Kawasaki Frontale - a Japanese professional soccer (football) club, belongs to (additional info and facts about J-league) J-league.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/K/Ka/Kawasaki.htm   (185 words)

  
 Stomach cancer
Staging of stomach cancer is based on how deep the growth has penetrated the stomach lining; to what extent (if any) it has invaded surrounding lymph nodes; and to what extent (if any) it has spread to distant parts of the body (metastasized).
The stomach is a J-shaped organ that lies in the left and central portion of the abdomen.
Stomach cancer (also known as gastric cancer) is a disease in which the cells forming the inner lining of the stomach become abnormal and start to divide uncontrollably, forming a mass called a tumor.
www.healthatoz.com /healthatoz/Atoz/ency/stomach_cancer.jsp   (3275 words)

  
 Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine: Pathologic quiz case: An incidental gastric mass in a 71-year-old man who presented with pancreatic pseudocyst
A case of malignant gastric glomus tumor with metastases to the liver, lymph nodes, and peritoneum has been reported; the patient, however, lived for more than 15 years following the surgical resection.4 Another case of gastric glomangioma included a massive tumor of the greater curvature of the stomach that weighed 12 kg.
This pattern is distinguished from carcinoids because vascular channels are not a feature of carcinoids.1 In glomus tumors, immunostains for smooth muscle markers, such as smooth muscle actin and muscle-specific antigen, are positive, and leukocyte common antigen and neuroendocrine markers, such as synaptophysin and chromogranin, are negative, differentiating glomus tumors from carcinoid and lymphoma, respectively.
Glomus cells are uniform and round, with central dark nuclei containing coarse chromatin and pale, eosinophilic, amphophilic, or clear cytoplasm.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3725/is_200212/ai_n9159997   (3275 words)

  
 SBRI - Diseases: African Sleeping Sickness
Initially, parasites multiply in the blood, causing a litany of non-specific symptoms, such as fever, severe headache, extreme fatigue, swollen lymph nodes and aching muscles and joints.
In the second phase of disease, the parasites infect the central nervous system resulting in irreversible neurological damage manifested by confusion, personality changes, difficulty walking, sleep disturbance, and eventually coma and death.
African sleeping sickness is a parasitic infection caused by a species of parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, which is transmitted to humans through the bite of the tsetse fly.
www.sbri.org /diseases/african.asp   (426 words)

  
 Pulmonary Embolus
Extrinsic compression of the pulmonary vessels by primary lung carcinomas, metastatic lesions to the lung, and enlarged hilar lymph nodes can also result in abrupt occlusion of a pulmonary vessel.
Less common findings are pulmonary hypertension, congestive heart failure, Westermark's sign (enlargement of the central vessels with segmental or lobar oligemia), and Hampton's hump (a wedge-shaped opacity abutting the pleura due to pulmonary infarction).
Occlusion of the pulmonary arteries may be seen in other disorders including an arteritis involving the pulmonary vasculature, such as Takayasu's arteritis.
brighamrad.harvard.edu /Cases/bwh/hcache/182/full.html   (426 words)

  
 Stomach cancer
Staging of stomach cancer is based on how deep the growth has penetrated the stomach lining; to what extent (if any) it has invaded surrounding lymph nodes; and to what extent (if any) it has spread to distant parts of the body (metastasized).
The stomach is a J-shaped organ that lies in the left and central portion of the abdomen.
Stomach cancer (also known as gastric cancer) is a disease in which the cells forming the inner lining of the stomach become abnormal and start to divide uncontrollably, forming a mass called a tumor.
www.healthatoz.com /healthatoz/Atoz/ency/stomach_cancer.jsp   (3275 words)

  
 CHEST: Tumors of the anterior mediastinum - Primary Mediastinal Tumors, part 1 - review article
The middle mediastinum is defined as the space that contains the heart and pericardium to include the ascending and transverse aorta, the brachiocephalic vessels, the vena cavae, the main pulmonary arteries and veins, the trachea, bronchi, and lymph nodes.
The mediastinum is located in the central portion of the thorax, between the two pleural cavities, the diaphragm and the thoracic inlet.[1] It is usually divided into anterior, middle, and posterior "compartments" to help categorize tumors and diseases according to their site of origin and location.
Primarily mediastinal tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplastic, congenital, and inflammatory conditions.[3] Neurogenic tumors, thymomas, and benign cysts account for approximately 60% of surgically resected lesions while lymphoma, teratomas, and granulomatous diseases together comprise an additional 30%.[1] In nonsurgical series, vascular lesions, typically aortic aneurysms, account for 10% of mediastinal masses.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0984/is_n2_v112/ai_19731473   (996 words)

  
 BioMed Central Full text Improved immunohistochemical evaluation of micrometastases in sentinel lymph nodes of cutaneous melanoma with 'MCW Melanoma Cocktail' – A mixture of monoclonal antibodies to MART-1, melan-A, and tyrosinase
In the present study, we evaluated the combination of monoclonal antibodies; MART-1, Melan-A, and Tyrosinase in optimized titers (Table 1) for evaluation of sentinel lymph nodes of cutaneous melanoma.
Improved immunohistochemical evaluation of micrometastases in sentinel lymph nodes of cutaneous melanoma with 'MCW Melanoma Cocktail' – A mixture of monoclonal antibodies to MART-1, melan-A, and tyrosinase
Hypothetically, due to the immunoreactivity of the cocktail towards three epitopes of two antigens in the same tissue section, combined use of these immunomarkers should increase the sensitivity while still maintaining their individual high specificity.
www.biomedcentral.com /1471-2407/3/15   (996 words)

  
 Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)
Leukemic cells accumulate in the bone marrow, replace normal blood cells and spread to the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, central nervous system, kidneys and gonads.
Although approximately 80 to 90 percent of children with acute myeloid leukemia attain remissions (absence of leukemic cells), some of those patients have later recurrences.
Approximately 500 children are diagnosed with  acure myeloid leukemia  in the
www.stjude.org /disease-summaries/0,2557,449_2165_2976,00.html   (996 words)

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