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Topic: Ceremonial counties of England


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  Ceremonial counties of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England.
For example, The administrative counties of East Suffolk and West Suffolk were considered to make up a single ceremonial county of Suffolk, and the administrative county of the Isle of Wight was part of the ceremonial county of Hampshire.
This led to a resurrection of a distinction between the local government counties and the ceremonial or geographic counties used for Lieutenancy, and also to the adoption of the term 'ceremonial counties', which although not used in statute was used in the House of Commons prior to the arrangements coming into effect.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ceremonial_counties_of_England   (673 words)

  
 Counties of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
These counties have later been dubbed 'ceremonial counties', and were shown on Ordnance Survey maps of the time as 'counties' or later 'geographic counties'.
It abolished the previously existing administrative counties and county boroughs (but not the previous non-administrative 'counties') and created a new set of 46 'counties' in England, 6 of which were metropolitan and 40 of which were non-metropolitan.
Because of the local government reforms in the 1990s, the distinction between the counties used for local government and those used for Lieutenancy, that had been abolished in 1974, was revived, and a new term, 'ceremonial county', coined as a distinct name for the area.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Counties_of_England   (740 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Ceremonial counties of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Rutland is traditionally Englands smallest county and is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire, northeast by Lincolnshire, and southeast by Northamptonshire.
Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census).
Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Ceremonial-counties-of-England   (6014 words)

  
 :::► Dictionary of Meaning www.mauspfeil.net ◄:::
Ceremonial counties of England Ceremonial county and Subdivisions of England#Unitary Authorities Unitary District - Region:
Alan Duncan } '''Rutland''' is traditionally England's smallest traditional county county and is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire, northeast by Lincolnshire, and southeast by Northamptonshire.
The administrative county was made a district of Leicestershire in the local government reorganisation of 1974, but was restored to top-level authority status by popular demand on 1 April 1997.
www.mauspfeil.net /Rutland.html   (567 words)

  
 Ceremonial counties of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Ceremonial counties before the creation of [[Greater London in 1965 (excluding Bristol).]] After the 1888 establishment of county councils and county boroughs, the Lieutenancy was reformed from its earlier basis (based in large part on the traditional counties, although there were differences, as for example Bristol had had a Lord-Lieutenant for centuries).
Ceremonial counties from 1974 to 1996 In 1974, county boroughs were abolished, and a major reform of the administrative counties took place.
It is worthy of note that Cornwall is the only county in which there exists a large minority who claim that Cornwall is quite incorrectly considered a Ceremonial county of England and should instead be referred to as a Duchy and one of the home nations of the UK (see the constitutional status of Cornwall).
ceremonial-counties-of-england.area51.ipupdater.com   (603 words)

  
 YourArt.com >> Encyclopedia >> Cheshire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Cheshire (or archaically the County of Chester) is a palatine county in North West England.
It borders the ceremonial counties of Merseyside, Greater Manchester, Derbyshire, Staffordshire (with Stoke-on-Trent), and Shropshire.
Cheshire is rich in canals, particularly the east of the county with its strategic importance between Manchester, Stoke and Birmingham.
www.yourart.com /research/encyclopedia.cgi?subject=/Cheshire   (886 words)

  
 YourArt.com >> Encyclopedia >> Norfolk   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
By the 5th century the Angles, for whom East Anglia and England itself are named, had established control of the region and later became the "north folk" and the "south folk", hence, "Norfolk" and "Suffolk".
The chalk is part of the Southern England Chalk Formation which is also found in Salisbury Plain, the South Downs and Isle of Wight, though in Norfolk it doesn't form as high hills as to the south.
Norfolk's county town and only city is Norwich, one of the largest settlements in England during the Norman era.
www.yourart.com /research/encyclopedia.cgi?subject=/Norfolk   (1441 words)

  
 Ireland Information Guide , Irish, Counties, Facts, Statistics, Tourism, Culture, How
County Durham is a county in north-east England, with an area of 2,258 km² and an estimated population (November 2002) of 486,000.
The east of the county between the Ryhope district of Sunderland and Seaton Carew in Hartlepool is the coastline of the North Sea.
Geographically, County Durham is roughly bounded by the watershed of the Pennines in the west, the River Tees in the south, the North Sea in the east and the River Tyne/River Derwent in the north.
www.irelandinformationguide.com /County_Durham   (654 words)

  
 Ceremonial counties of England
The ceremonial counties first diverged from the traditional counties of England in 1373, when a Lord-Lieutenant of Bristol was created.
Following the reorganisation of the administrative counties in the 1990s, they are no longer aligned with these either.
See also: Ceremonial counties of Wales, Lieutenancy areas of Scotland, Administrative counties of England, Traditional counties of England, UK topics.
guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/c/ce/ceremonial_counties_of_england.html   (205 words)

  
 Ceremonial counties of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that areappointed a Lord Lieutenant, and are defined by the government withreference to administrative counties of England.
After the 1888 establishment of county councils and county boroughs, theLieutenancy was reformed from its earlier basis (based in large part on the traditional counties, although there were differences, as for example Bristol had had a Lord-Lieutenant for centuries).
So forexample, the ceremonial county of Leicestershire was composed of theadministrative county of Leicestershire, and the county borough of Leicester.Areas that were subdivided, (such as East Suffolk and West Suffolk) were retained as a single ceremonial county, (Suffolk).
www.therfcc.org /ceremonial-counties-of-england-38272.html   (499 words)

  
 Ceremonial counties of england - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Look for Ceremonial counties of england in Wiktionary, our sister dictionary project.
Look for Ceremonial counties of england in the Commons, our repository for free images, music, sound, and video.
Check for Ceremonial counties of england in the deletion log, or visit its deletion vote page if it exists.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/ceremonial_counties_of_england   (171 words)

  
 Traditional counties of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The traditional Counties (or historic Counties) of England are historical and geographical subdivisions of the country.
As a set, the traditional counties, as supported by traditionalists, have never been used for administrative purposes : 'counties of cities' had started to be created in the 12th century, whereas Berwick-upon-Tweed was only formally incorporated into administrative Northumberland in 1974.
The ABC however claim that it is "manifest" that the 1888 counties were being abolished, and that the repeal of the Act had no effect whatsoever on the historic counties.
www.indexuslist.de /keyword/Traditional_counties_of_England.php   (1299 words)

  
 Counties of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
England has been divided into counties for hundreds of years.
There are now exactly 81 county level entities, excluding Greater London.
They included most of the 1974 changes, but did not acknowledge Greater Manchester or Greater London as postal counties.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Counties_of_England   (740 words)

  
 List of ceremonial counties of England by area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from List of Ceremonial counties of England by Area)
See List of non-metropolitan counties of England by area for a list that does not include metropolitan counties or unitary authorities.
This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Area.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/List_of_Ceremonial_counties_of_England_by_Area   (99 words)

  
 Camelot Village: Britain's Heritage and History
County Town: GLOUCESTER Lies on the east bank of the Severn, its centre spread around a curve in the river.
In 1373 Edward III decreed the City and County of Bristol "was a County by itself and separated (from the) Counties of Gloucester and Somerset and in all things exempt...
The county is set with small towns and pretty villages, often constructed and roofed with golden Cotswold stone.
www.camelotintl.com /heritage/counties/england/gloucester.html   (1035 words)

  
 Staffordshire - Voyager, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
It adjoins the ceremonial counties of Cheshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Warwickshire, West Midlands, Worcestershire and Shropshire.
The historic county of Staffordshire included Wolverhampton, Walsall, and West Bromwich, these were removed in 1974 to the new county of West Midlands.
In the north and in the south the county is hilly, with wild moorlands in the far north and Cannock Chase an area of natural beauty in the south.
www.voyager.in /Staffordshire   (396 words)

  
 wiki/Bethnal Green Definition / wiki/Bethnal Green Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Counties are usually divided into several districts, each with its own separate administration (districts may be called Boroughs in some cases).
Counties which consist of only one district are more popularly called Unitary Authorities, because they do not match the idea of a county established in the centuries before the 1990s.
It is one of the 39 historical counties of England.
www.elresearch.com /wiki/Bethnal_Green   (1797 words)

  
 wiki/Longfield Definition / wiki/Longfield Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
South East EnglandSouth East England is one of the official regions of England.
Ceremonial CountyThe Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to administrative counties of England.
Longfield is a thriving village in Kent, ten miles SE of DartfordDartford is a local government district and borough in Kent, England.
www.elresearch.com /wiki/Longfield   (288 words)

  
 Cornwall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
[[Ceremonial counties of EnglandCeremonial]] and (smaller) [[Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of EnglandNon-metropolitan]] county-!
The average annual temperature for most of the county is 10.2 to 12 degrees [[Celsius]] (50 to 54 °[[fahrenheitF]]), with slightly lower temperatures on the moors {{refav_temp}}.
Cornwall is one of the smaller counties by population and has around a fifth of the population of what is the smallest region of England.
cornwall.quickseek.com   (2650 words)

  
 History of the counties
A county palatine was a county in which the lord held particular rights in lieu of the monarch, for example the right to pardon those guilty of treason or murder.
In 1899, the county of London was formed from the city and parts of the surrounding counties of Kent, Middlesex and Surrey.
In the case of Scotland, the ceremonial areas for the Lord Lieutenants were not changed to match the new regions and many still represented the former counties.
jonathan.rawle.org /hyperpedia/counties/history.php   (1192 words)

  
 Herefordshire - Psychology Central   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
It borders the counties of Shropshire in the north, Worcestershire in the east, Gloucestershire in the south east and the Welsh preserved counties of Gwent in the south west and Powys in the west.
Main county towns include The City of Hereford, which is the main administrative centre, as well as Leominster, Ledbury, Ross On Wye, Kington and Bromyard.
The county is in the west of England which has been historically pastoral as opposed to the east which was more arable.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Herefordshire   (1203 words)

  
 Camelot Village: Britain's Heritage and History
Otherwise known as Somersetshire, the modern county of Somerset covers 1,365 square miles and has a population of 450,000.
Natural features of the county include the rivers Avon, Exe and Parret, the marshy coastline of the Bristol Channel and the Mendip Hills which include Cheddar Gorge, the origin of English Cheddar cheese.
Kilmington is a contiguous part of the County of Somerset under Wiltshire County and Salisbury District Councils.
www.camelotintl.com /heritage/counties/england/somerset.html   (927 words)

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