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Topic: Charles H Townes


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  Charles Hard Townes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Townes is known for his work on the theory and application of the maser, on which he obtained the fundamental patent, and other work in quantum electronics connected with both maser and laser devices.
Townes came to the California Institute of Technology as a graduate student in 1937, and received his PhD in 1939.
Charlie Townes was the lead researcher in the construction of the Infrared Spatial Interferometer, the first astronomical interferometer to operate in the mid-infrared.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Charles_Townes   (688 words)

  
 Charles H. Townes - Biography
Charles Hard Townes was born in Greenville, South Carolina, on July 28, 1915, the son of Henry Keith Townes, an attorney, and Ellen (Hard) Townes.
Townes completed work for the Master of Arts degree in Physics at Duke University in 1936, and then entered graduate school at the California Institute of Technology, where he received the Ph.D. degree in 1939 with a thesis on isotope separation and nuclear spins.
Townes and his students coined the word "maser" for this device, which is an acronym for microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation.
nobelprize.org /nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1964/townes-bio.html   (953 words)

  
 Guardian Unlimited | Life | Interview with Charles H Townes
Charles Hard Townes was born in 1915 in South Carolina in a Baptist household: he graduated in modern languages and physics from a Baptist college and went on to Duke University, and then the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.
Townes thought he had devised a scientific tool: he could have had no idea of the impact the laser would have on industry.
Townes went on to look for radiation from molecules in outer space - first ammonia, then water - and began to think about the parallel challenges of science and religion: the one, he points out, concerns itself with how the universe works, the other with why it exists at all.
www.guardian.co.uk /life/interview/story/0,,1476261,00.html   (995 words)

  
 telephone   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Charles H. Townes was born in Greenville, South Carolina, on July 28, 1915.
Townes completed his Master of Arts degree in physics at Duke University in 1936, and then graduated school at the California Institute of Technology, where he received his Ph.
In 1951, Townes conceived the idea of the maser, and a few months later he and his associates began working on a device using ammonia gas as the active medium.
antoine.frostburg.edu /phys/invention/inventors/charles.html   (389 words)

  
 Templeton Prize for Progress Toward Research or Discoveries about Spiritual Realities
Townes, 89, secured his place in the pantheon of great 20th-century scientists through his investigations into the properties of microwaves which resulted first in the maser, a device which amplifies electromagnetic waves, and later his co-invention of the laser, which amplifies and directs light waves into parallel direct beams.
Charles Hard Townes was born in Greenville, South Carolina in 1915 to Ellen and Henry Townes, an attorney.
Townes, who became an Officer of the French Legion of Honor in 1990, is also the recipient of the Niels Bohr International Gold Medal and nearly 100 other honors and awards, and holds honorary degrees from more than 25 universities.
www.templetonprize.org /townes_pressrelease.html   (1119 words)

  
 Townes Lectures on Black Hole
Nobel laureate Charles H. Townes gave a lecture last night discussing the research that proved the existence of a fl hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy.
Townes received the Nobel Prize in 1964 for his work in quantum electronics, which led to the construction of oscillators and amplifiers based on the maser-laser principle.
Townes served at MIT as Provost and Professor of Physics from 1961-1966, and was named Institute Professor in 1966.
www-tech.mit.edu /V121/N20/20townes.20n.html   (626 words)

  
 Charles H. Townes - Biography
Townes conceived the idea of the maser, and a few months later he and his associates began working on a device using ammonia gas as the active medium.
In 1958, Dr. Townes and his brother-in-law, Dr. A.L. Schavlow, now of Stanford University, showed theoretically that masers could be made to operate in the optical and infrared region and proposed how this could be accomplished in particular systems.
Townes was appointed Provost and Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
eraserall.bravehost.com /swq/townes-bio.html   (836 words)

  
 About Charles Townes (Hamiilton Lecture Speaker, March 2, 2000, Dept. of Physics, Princeton University)
Charles H. Townes' invention of the maser, a device that amplifies electromagnetic waves, created a means for the sensitive reception of communications and for precise navigation.
Townes is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Royal Society of London, the Max Planck Society, the National Inventors Hall of Fame, and the Engineering and Science Hall of Fame.
Among Dr. Townes' international awards are the Thomas Young Medal and Prize of the Institute of Physics and the Physical Society (England), the Wilhelm Exner Award (Austria), the 1979 Niels Bohr International Gold Medal, and the Rabindranath Tagore Award.
www.physics.princeton.edu /www/jh/about_townes.html   (276 words)

  
 Columbia News ::: Nobel Prize Winner Charles H. Townes To Deliver Armstrong Memorial Lecture, 'Sociology and Surprise ...
The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science welcomes Charles H. Townes, professor emeritus, University of California, Berkeley, as guest speaker for the Armstrong Memorial Lecture on March 26, at 4:00 p.m.
Townes was a physics professor at Columbia from 1948-1961, leaving to join the Kennedy administration as a science advisor.
Townes' lecture will be a broad discussion of the invention, history and development of the laser as an example of the unpredictability of new discoveries in science and technology, mutual support between these two fields, and the importance of personal interactions in their rapid development.
www.columbia.edu /cu/news/03/03/armstrong.html   (261 words)

  
 Charles H. Townes
Madden, A. Poglitsch, N. Geis, G. Stacey, and C. Townes, “[C II] 158 micron observations of IC 10: evidence for hidden molecular hydrogen in irregular galaxies,” Ap.
Monnier, M. Bester, W. Danchi, M. Johnson, E. Lipman, C. Townes, P. Tuthill, and T. Geballe, “Observations and modeling of the nonuniform dust outflow around the red supergiant NML-Cygni,” in A Half Century of Stellar Pulsation Interpretations: A tribute to Arthur N. Cox, P.A. Bradley and J.A. Guzik (Eds.), APS Conference Series 135, p.
Weiner, W. Danchi, D. Hale, J. McMahon, C. Townes, J. Monnier, and P. Tuthill, “Precision measurements of the diameters of Orinis and Ceti at 11 microns,” Ap.
www.physics.berkeley.edu /research/faculty/Townes.html   (718 words)

  
 BookRags: Charles H. Townes Biography
Charles H. Townes was awarded a share of the 1964 Nobel Prize in physics for his discovery in 1951 of the maser, a device that can amplify microwaves for practical applications.
Charles Hard Townes was born in Greenville, South Carolina, on July 28, 1915.
Townes was married on May 4, 1941, to the former Francis H. Brown, and they raised four children.
www.bookrags.com /biography/charles-h-townes-wop   (1029 words)

  
 Charles Townes Receives 2006 Vannevar Bush Award
At the age of 90, Townes is an active researcher at the University of California at Berkeley, where he uses infrared interferometry to measure the size of old, dying stars and to study the gases that escape from them.
Townes and co-recipient Raj Reddy, a robotics researcher at Carnegie Mellon University, accepted their awards at a dinner on May 9 at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. In accepting the award, Townes implored scientists to participate in policy discussions so that the fruits of science can continue to benefit humankind.
In his introduction to Townes’ 1974 Carnegie Evening lecture, Philip H. Abelson, then president of the institution, remarked that Townes is “…one of the few Nobel laureates whose recognition by the Nobel committee didn’t wreck him as a scientist.
www.hq.ciw.edu /Townes   (510 words)

  
 BookRags: Charles H. Townes Biography
Charles Townes is generally considered the American inventor of the maser (an acronym for microwave amplification by the stimulated emission of radiation), an honor he shares with two Russian scientists, Aleksandr Prokhorov and Nikolai Basov.
Townes concentrated his research on microwave spectroscopy, the study of the basic structure of matter.
In 1959, Townes took a two year leave of absence from Columbia to serve as vice-president and director of research of the Institute for Defense Analyses in Washington, D.C. In 1961, he became provost and professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
www.bookrags.com /biography/charles-h-townes-woi   (697 words)

  
 Laser   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The first working Laser was made by Theodore H. Maiman in 1960 at Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, California, beating several Research teams including those of Townes at Columbia University, and Schawlow at Bell laboratories.
Townes later worked with Arthur L. Schawlow to describe the theory of the laser, or optical maser as it was then known.
In 1964, Charles Townes, Nikolai Basov and Alexandr Prokhorov shared a Nobel Prize in Physics "for fundamental work in the field of quantum electronics, which has led to the construction of oscillators and amplifiers based on the maser-laser principle." Laser Light can be highly intense&8212;able to cut steel and other metals.
laser.iqnaut.net   (2162 words)

  
 Amazon.frĀ : How the Laser Happened: Adventures of a Scientist: Livres en anglais: Charles H. Townes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Townes was inventor of the maser, of which the laser is one example; an originator of spectroscopy using microwaves; and a pioneer in the study of gas clouds in galaxies and around stars.
In addition, Townes touches on the sociology of science, uncovering some of the traditions and values that are invisible to an outsider.
In addition to fundamental research, he was actively involved in the practical uses of the laser and in the court cases to defend the patent rights.
www.amazon.fr /How-Laser-Happened-Adventures-Scientist/dp/0195122682   (556 words)

  
 BW Online | August 2, 2004 | Charles H. Townes: The Light Fantastic
It was 1937, and Charles H. Townes, a first-year grad student at California Institute of Technology, faced a tough decision: pursue theoretical physics, a field then electrified by Einstein's ideas, or go into experimental physics, where he would build machines to test theories.
Townes patented the laser in 1959 and won a Nobel prize five years later.
Townes shared the 1964 Nobel for it with two Soviet scientists who were doing related research.
www.businessweek.com /magazine/content/04_31/b3894027_mz072.htm   (790 words)

  
 Jeff Quinton - Backcountry Conservative: Charles H. Townes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Townes later becomes a professor at Columbia University.
In 1964, Townes, along with A. Prokhorov and N. Basov, shared the Nobel Prize for Physics.
Townes taught at MIT and served as Vice President of the Institute for Defense Analysis.
www.jquinton.com /archives/000148.html   (186 words)

  
 Laser Focus World - Townes honored with science complex in his name   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The new science complex will be called the Charles H. Townes Center for Science and that a large library room in the center of the complex will be named for Dr. Townes wife, Frances Brown Townes.
The Charles H. Townes Center for Science will feature the construction of two new buildings and the renovation of Plyler Hall, the university's existing science building.
The 90-year-old Townes was awarded the Nobel Prize for his contributions to the invention of the laser and maser.
lfw.pennnet.com /Articles/Article_Display.cfm?ARTICLE_ID=252344&p=12   (320 words)

  
 Charles Hard Townes
Townes, Charles Hard, 1915–, American physicist and educator, b.
Townes is known for his work on the theory and application of the
Charles Hard Townes - Charles Hard Townes Born: 1915 Birthplace: Greenville, South Carolina Masers—Townes...
www.factmonster.com /ce6/people/A0849174.html   (206 words)

  
 Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Society: Charles H. Townes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Charles H. Townes is University Professor of Physics Emeritus at the University of California at Berkeley.
In five and a half decades of work, Townes’ accomplishments range from helping ease the strain of everyday life to studying the origin of the universe.
New infrared techniques, discovery of stable molecules in galactic clouds and discovery of evidence for a large fl hole in the center of our galaxy resulted from his work in astrophysics.
www.sigmaxi.org /programs/prizes/common.townes.shtml   (204 words)

  
 1995 Charles Townes Award
This Award is the namesake of Charles H. Townes, a native South Carolinian and Nobel Laureate in physics.
With a concentration in quantum electronics, Townes is internationally known for his invention of the maser/laser.
The Townes Award is presented by the Governor's School for Science and Mathematics to honor those persons who go beyond the requirements of their professional positions to assist South Carolina in improving science and mathematics education at all levels.
www.cofc.edu /~chem/faculty/townes.html   (650 words)

  
 Charles H. Townes: Adventures of a Scientist
Charles Townes won the Nobel Prize for his role in the invention of the maser and the laser.
He is currently a professor in the graduate school at the University of California at Berkeley.
Harry Kreisler, "Charles H. Townes: Adventures of a Scientist" (February 15, 2000).
repositories.cdlib.org /iis/video/04   (143 words)

  
 IEEEVM: Charles H. Townes
The maser (an acronym for microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) he developed at Columbia was the successful result of Townes’ search for a way to obtain stronger radiation with shorter wavelengths using a source other than a vacuum tube.
During the 1960s Townes served on the President’s Science Advisory Committee for the Johnson administration.
In 1964 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his contribution to the study of quantum electronics, especially the maser and laser, and in 1967 he was awarded the IEEE Medal of Honor.
www.ieee-virtual-museum.org /collection/people.php?id=1234588&lid=1   (386 words)

  
 Charles H. Townes Winner of the 1964 Nobel Prize in Physics
Charles H. Townes Winner of the 1964 Nobel Prize in Physics
About Townes and his invention of the maser (submitted by Karl Sau)
Charled H. Townes Biography from Encyclopedia Britannica (submitted by www.britannica.com)
almaz.com /nobel/physics/1964a.html   (130 words)

  
 Program Highlights   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Charles H. Townes is the 2005 Templeton Prize Laureate.
Townes has spent decades as a leading advocate for the convergence of science and religion.
Recently, Townes has been a champion of optical searches for extraterrestrial intelligence, using methods he first proposed in 1961 as a complement to searches for radio transmissions.
www.aarweb.org /annualmeet/2005/pbook/highlights.asp   (11893 words)

  
 Charles H. Townes Books - Signed, used, new, out-of-print
Nobel Prize winner Townes and noted scientist Schawlow give systematic, comprehensive account.
From one of the most imaginative and daring scientific minds of this or any century comes a thoughtful, almost intimate account of a personal journey through his momentous discoveries - achievements that have changed the face of medicine, industry, even weapons.
Nobel laureate Charles H. Townes, inventor of the maser and co-inventor, with Arthur...
www.alibris.com /search/books/author/Charles_H_Townes   (264 words)

  
 Townes Charles H NULL AIP International Catalog of Sources   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Townes Charles H NULL AIP International Catalog of Sources
A life in physics : Bell Telephone Laboratories and World War II, Columbia University and the laser, MIT and government service, California and research in astrophysics : oral history transcript / Charles Hard Townes ; with an introduction by Arthur L. Schawlow ; interviews conducted by Suzanne B. Riess in 1991-1992.
Includes interview with Townes' wife, Frances Brown Townes.
www.aip.org /history/catalog/icos/6956.html   (181 words)

  
 1999-2000 Godfrey Lecturer: Dr. Charles H. Townes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Charles H. Townes, 8th Godfrey Distinguished Lecturer, listens to Huabei Jiang explain the use of lasers in his biophysics laboratory at Clemson University.
For his discovery of the maser and the laser, Townes was ranked 819th in a book of the most influential persons of the millenium.
These pages are maintained by the Astrophysics Group at Clemson University.
www.astro.clemson.edu /Godfrey/00_Townes.html   (58 words)

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