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Topic: Charles I of England


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In the News (Fri 17 Nov 17)

  
  History of the Monarchy > The Stuarts > Charles I
Charles I was born in Fife on 19 November 1600, the second son of James VI of Scotland (from 1603 also James I of England) and Anne of Denmark.
Charles did not see his action as surrender, but as an opportunity to regain lost ground by playing one group off against another; he saw the monarchy as the source of stability and told parliamentary commanders 'you cannot be without me: you will fall to ruin if I do not sustain you'.
Charles I, in his unwavering belief that he stood for constitutional and social stability, and the right of the people to enjoy the benefits of that stability, fatally weakened his position by failing to negotiate a compromise with Parliament and paid the price.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page76.asp   (1990 words)

  
  Charles I (of England) - MSN Encarta
Charles I (of England) (1600-1649), king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625-1649), who was deposed and executed during the English Revolution.
Charles was unable to quell the revolt, and in 1640 he convoked the so-called Short Parliament to raise an army and necessary funds.
Soon after, Charles was implicated in a plot to murder the leaders of the Covenanters, a Scottish group devoted to maintaining Presbyterianism.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761566517/Charles_I_(of_England).html   (940 words)

  
  Charles I, King of Great Britain and Ireland (1600-1649)
Charles at this juncture, on the 24th of September, summoned a great council of the peers; and on the 21st of October a cessation of arms was agreed to by the treaty of Ripon, the Scots receiving £850 a day for the maintenance of the army, and further negotiations being transferred to London.
Charles returned to London on the 25th of November 1641 and was immediately confronted by the Grand Remonstrance (passed on the 22nd), inwhich, after reciting the chief pointsof the king's misgovernment, the parliament demanded the appointment of acceptable ministers and the constitution of an assembly of divines to settle the religious question.
Charles, therefore, in some degree inherited a situation for which he was not responsible, nor can he be justly blamed, according to the ideas of kingship which then prevailed, for defending the prerogatives of the crown as precious and sacred personal possessions which it was his duty to hand down intact to his successors.
www.luminarium.org /encyclopedia/kingcharles.htm   (6392 words)

  
 Charles II of England
Charles II (May 29, 1630 - February 6, 1685) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland (proclaimed by monarchists January 30, 1649; assumed throne at the restoration May 29, 1660 - February 6, 1685).
He was the eldest son of King Charles I of England and Queen Henrietta Maria.
Charles continued to keep mistresses, the most famous of whom was the actress, Nell Gwyn.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ch/Charles_II_of_England.html   (621 words)

  
  Charles I of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Charles also adopted a religious policy that continued the Anglican "middle path," and was actively hostile to the Reformist tendencies of many of his English and Scottish subjects.
Charles, the second son of James VI, King of Scots and Anne of Denmark, was born at Dunfermline Palace on 19 November 1600.
Charles and his advisors sought to have Felton tortured to death on the rack, but were foiled by an opinion of an unanimous panel of judges.
www.leessummit.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Charles_I_of_England   (4646 words)

  
 Charles I of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Charles ascended the throne in March 1625 and on 1 May of that year was married to Henrietta Maria, nine years his junior, by proxy.
Charles' attempt to rule without Parliament was not unlawful under the precedents at that time: it constituted a valid exercise of the royal prerogative, although it must be noted that what had been considered lawful in previous times may well be seen as tyrannical in contemporary eyes.
Charles was buried in private and at night on 7 February 1649, in the Henry VIII vault inside St.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http%3A%2F%2Farticles.gourt.com%2F%3Farticle%3DCharles_I_of_England%23Personal_Rule%26type%3Den   (4882 words)

  
 Charles I, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Charles governed without Parliament for 11 years after 1629, which were marked by popular opposition to strict enforcement of the practices of the Established Church by Archbishop William Laud and to the ingenious if disingenuous devices employed by the government to obtain funds.
Conditions in England reached a crisis when Charles attempted (1637) to force episcopacy upon the Scots, an attempt that was violently opposed by the Scottish Covenanters and that resulted in the Bishops’ Wars.
Charles repudiated the charges, and his unsuccessful attempt to seize five opposition leaders of Commons in violation of traditional privilege was the fatal blunder that precipitated war.
www.bartleby.com /65/ch/Charles1Eng.html   (985 words)

  
 Charles I of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Charles I (November 19, 1600 - January 30, 1649) was King of Scotland, England, and Ireland (March 27, 1625 - January 30, 1649), and is most notable for being the only British monarch to be overthrown and beheaded.
Charles was beheaded on January 30, 1649 by Richard Brandon, a professional hangman, in front of the Banqueting House at the Palace of Whitehall.
King Charles I is buried in the Henry VIII vault at Windsor Castle.
usapedia.com /c/charles-i-of-england.html   (1641 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Charles ascended the throne on 27 March 1625 and on 13 June of that year was married to Henrietta Maria, nine years his junior, by proxy.
Charles was committed to help his brother-in-law regain the Palatinate by waging a war with the Catholic Spanish King Philip IV, whom he hoped he could force to intercede with the Emperor on his behalf.
Charles was buried in private and at night on 7 February 1649, in the Henry VIII vault inside St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=Charles_I_of_England   (5868 words)

  
 English civil war. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
1642–48, the conflict between King Charles I of England and a large body of his subjects, generally called the “parliamentarians,” that culminated in the defeat and execution of the king and the establishment of a republican commonwealth.
Charles was beheaded on Jan. 30, 1649, and the republic known as the Commonwealth was set up, governed by the Rump Parliament (without the House of Lords) and by an executive council of state.
Charles I’s son Charles II was recognized as king in parts of Ireland and in Scotland but was forced to flee to the Continent after his defeat at Worcester (1651).
www.bartleby.com /65/en/EnglshCW.html   (2321 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Charles II of England Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Charles was the eldest son of King Charles I of England and Queen Henrietta Maria, born at St James's Palace on May 29 1630.
Charles set out for England, arriving on May 23, 1660, reaching London on May 29, 1660 which is considered the day of his restoration to the throne.
Charles died of a stroke at the Palace of Whitehall.
www.ipedia.com /charles_ii_of_england.html   (1538 words)

  
 Charles I of England - Wikinfo
Charles I (November 19, 1600 - January 30, 1649) was King of Scotland, England, and Ireland (March 27, 1625 - January 30, 1649), and is most notable for being the only British monarch to be overthrown and beheaded.
Charles set up court at Oxford, from where his government controlled roughly the north and west of England, Parliament remaining in control of London and the south and east.
Charles was beheaded on January 30, 1649 by Richard Brandon, a professional hangman, in front of the Banqueting House at the Palace of Whitehall.
wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Charles_I_of_England   (5113 words)

  
 Charles I of England - British Royalty
Charles believed in a sacramental version of the Church of England, called High Anglicanism, with a theology based upon Arminianism, a belief shared by his main political advisor, Archbishop William Laud.
Charles, the second son of James VI, King of Scots and Anne of Denmark, was born at Dunfermline Palace on 19 November 1600.
When Elizabeth I died in March 1603 and James VI became King of England as James I, Charles was originally left in Scotland in the care of nurses and servants because it was feared that the journey would damage his fragile health.
webasyst.webasyst.net /wbs/QP/html/scripts/published.php?DB_KEY=V0VCQVNZU1Q=&BookID=britishroyalty   (811 words)

  
 [No title]
Charles is her envoy to the papal farewell but he's...
What her majesty plans to do is to announce an hour before the ceremony begins that that split with Rome a while back was based on a misunderstanding and her entire family are converting back to Catholicism forthwith.
The earliest government was set aside in 1669 by a plan originating in the brain of the philosopher Locke, which contemplated an elaborate system of offices of state, an hereditary nobility, and similar features, impossible of realization in an infant settlement of scattered planters.[28] But in 1691 this system was abrogated by popular demand.
www.lycos.com /info/charles-i-england--miscellaneous.html   (354 words)

  
 [No title]
In 1671 the perfidious Charles II of England and the equally untrustworthy Louis XIV of France joined in a plot to invade the Netherlands.
It was not strange that Louis XIV was a part of the plot, for the king of France was constantly searching in all the corners of Europe for places in which to meddle and for countries to bring under his rule.
The return of Charles II from exile in 1660 began a period of revenge on the Presbyterians in England, as he endorsed the restoration of episcopacy and the use of the Common Book of Prayer.
www.lycos.com /info/charles-i-england--charles-ii.html   (556 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
Charles I was born in 1600, the second son of James I and Anne of Denmark.
Charles inherited the incessant financial problems of his father: the refusal of Parliament to grant funds to a king who refused to address the grievances of the nobility.
Charles' forces were ill prepared due to lack of proper funds, causing the king to call, first, the Short Parliament, and finally the Long Parliament.
www.britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon47.html   (650 words)

  
 The Avalon Project : Commission to Sir Ferdinando Gorges as Governor of New England by Charles ; July 23, 1637
The Avalon Project : Commission to Sir Ferdinando Gorges as Governor of New England by Charles ; July 23, 1637
Commission to Sir Ferdinando Gorges as Governor of New England by Charles ; July 23, 1637
And we have seriously advised with our Council both of the way of reformation and of a person meet and able for that employment by whose gravity, moderation, and experience we have hopes to repair what is amiss and settlement of those affairs to the good of our people and honour of our government.
www.yale.edu /lawweb/avalon/states/charter_009.htm   (187 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Anthony van Dyck
He painted portraits of King Charles, Queen Henrietta, the king's children, the Earl of Strafford and countless other personages at court, in addition to images of himself and his mistress, Margaret Lemon.
Charles I (19 November 1600 –; 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland, and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.
In 1632, Charles I invited Van Dyck to England to be a court painter.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Anthony-van-Dyck   (2295 words)

  
 ::Charles I::
Charles I was born in 1600 in Fife, Scotland.
Charles was the second son of James I.
Charles was a quiet person who tended to stay in the background as he had a stammer.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /charles_i.htm   (697 words)

  
 Charles I of England Summary
Charles I (1600-1649), king of England from 1625 to 1649, was to witness and take part in the English civil war, or Puritan Revolution, which ultimately cost him his life.
The second son of James VI of Scotland (later James I of England) and Anne of Denmark, Charles I was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, on Nov. 19, 1600.
Charles could not allow the heart of his prerogative to be thus torn from him, and so on August 14 the King raised his standard at Nottingham and called upon all his loyal subjects to defend his right.
www.bookrags.com /Charles_I_of_England   (6222 words)

  
 Charles II of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Charles was also a patron of the arts, and he and his court were largely responsible for the revival of public drama and music, after their virtual prohibition under the earlier Protectorate.
Charles, the eldest surviving son of Charles I of England and Henrietta Maria of France, was born Charles Stuart in St.
Charles' wife Queen Catherine was unable to produce an heir, her pregnancies instead ending in miscarriages and stillbirths.
www.anime.co.za /wiki/Charles_II_of_England   (4593 words)

  
 King Charles I
Charles, unable to raise a strong army, was forced to agree not to interfere with religion in Scotland.
Charles wore two shirts as he was worried that if he shivered in the cold people would think he was afraid of dying.
Charles was an Anglican and because of his wife was inclined to tolerate the Roman Catholics; Parliament was Puritan and anti-Catholic...
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /STUcharles1.htm   (2506 words)

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