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Topic: Charles Wesley


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  The religion of Charles Wesley, hymnist, co-founder of Methodism
Charles Wesley, M A., 'sweet singer of Methodism' and arguably the greatest hymn writer ever, died on March 29th 1788.
Although the Methodist Church has every reason to remember Charles Wesley on what is also the 250th anniversary of the brother's conversion (May, 1738), evangelical people of all denominations have cause to thank God for hymns which are in a sense the property of us all...
Charles Wesley stood at Whitefields side when he preached to an enormous crowd at Blackheath, and asked, "What has Satan gained by turning him out of the churches?" In May, Charles Wesley joined his brother in following Whitefield's example when he preached to large crowds in the Essex villages.
www.adherents.com /people/pw/Charles_Wesley.html   (1068 words)

  
  Charles Wesley: O For A Thousand Tongues To Sing
To the Methodists, Charles Wesley is known as the co-founder of the Methodist Church.
Charles Wesley was born at Epworth in Lincolnshire December 18, 1707, as the third surviving son and eighteenth child of Samuel and Susanna Annesley Wesley.
Charles had hoped to return to America; however, he had a severe attack of pleurisy, and it seemed that the only path for him to take at this point was an academic life at Oxford.
biographies.texasfasola.org /charleswesley.html   (1505 words)

  
  Charles Wesley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Charles Wesley (12 December 1707 - 29 March 1788) was a leader of the Methodist movement, the younger brother of John Wesley.
Charles Wesley is chiefly remembered for the many hymns he wrote.
Charles followed his father and brother into the church in 1735, and travelled with John to Georgia in America in the entourage of the governor, James Oglethorpe, returning a year later.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Charles_Wesley   (362 words)

  
 Charles Wesley   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Charles Wesley (1707 - 1788) was a leader of the Methodist (A follower of Wesleyanism as practiced by the Methodist Church) movement, the younger brother of John Wesley (English clergyman and founder of Methodism (1703-1791)).
Charles Wesley is chiefly remembered for the many hymn (A song of praise (to God or to a saint or to a nation)) s he wrote.
In particular, Charles was strongly opposed to the idea of a breach with the Church of England (The national church of England (and all other churches in other countries that share its beliefs); has its see in Canterbury and the Sovereign as its temporal head) into which they had been ordained.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/c/ch/charles_wesley.htm   (443 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Charles Wesley   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
To the Methodists, Charles Wesley is known as the co-founder of the Methodist Church.
Charles Wesley was born at Epworth in Lincolnshire December 18, 1707, as the third surviving son and eighteenth child of Samuel and Susanna Annesley Wesley.
WESLEY, CHARLES (1707-1788), divine and hymn-writer, eighteenth child, youngest and third surviving son of Samuel Wesley (1662-1735) [q.v.], was born at Epsworth Rectory, Lincolnshire, on 18 Dec. 1707.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Charles-Wesley   (1891 words)

  
 John Wesley and Savannah
John Wesley was approached by Oglethorpe to be a minister for the new parish of Savannah.
Wesley sought the advice of his trusted friend, Bishop Spangenberg of the Moravians, and was advised to avoid contact with female admirers.
Wesley was brought before the bailiff and the recorder, but he did not acknowledge the power of the civil courts over him because it was an ecclesiastical matter.
www.sip.armstrong.edu /Methodism/wesley.html   (2790 words)

  
 Dictionary of National Biography: Wesley, Charles (1707-1788)
WESLEY, CHARLES (1707-1788), divine and hymn-writer, eighteenth child, youngest and third surviving son of Samuel Wesley (1662-1735) [q.v.], was born at Epsworth Rectory, Lincolnshire, on 18 Dec. 1707.
Charles was always the champion of his brother's reputation, even when most suspicious of the aims of his followers.
Charles Wesley's untouched work is to be seen in publications issued in his sole name, and in posthumous prints from his manuscript.
www.ccel.org /ccel/ccel/eee/files/wesleyc.htm   (2830 words)

  
 LA Commission on Archives & History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Charles was assigned to Fort Frederica on St.
Wesley was a strong proponent of the social Gospel, and emphasized care for prisoners, the poor, the sick, and the uneducated.
John Wesley is born on June 17/28 in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England to Rev. Samuel Wesley and Susanna Wesley.
www.iscuo.org /300th.htm   (1763 words)

  
 Faith Hall of Fame - Charles Wesley
Although the Methodist Church has every reason to remember Charles Wesley on what is also the 250th anniversary of the brother's conversion (May, 1738), evangelical people of all denominations have cause to thank God for hymns which are in a sense the property of us all.
Charles accompanied John on the mission to the new colony of Georgia in 1735.
Charles Wesley's new spiritual life was seen in his deep compassion for lost men and women.
www.eaec.org /faithhallfame/charleswesley.htm   (2442 words)

  
 Charles Wesley And Methodist Hymnology
Charles Wesley, if less adapted for practical achievements among men than his brother John, was, on the whole his efficient coadjutor.
Charles in temperament was much less even and settled than his brother.
It was the fortune of Charles Wesley to reach the goal before his brother.
www.edwardtbabinski.us /sheldon/charles_wesley_hymnology.html   (529 words)

  
 Charles Wesley Jarvis Online
Charles Wesley Jarvis at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City
Charles Wesley Jarvis at the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. Henry Clay, ca.1840
All images and text on this Charles Wesley Jarvis page are copyright 2007 by John Malyon/Artcyclopedia, unless otherwise noted.
www.artcyclopedia.com /artists/jarvis_charles_wesley.html   (146 words)

  
 African American Registry: Charles Wesley, an early promoter of Black studies
Born in Louisville, Kentucky, Charles Wesley attended public schools in his hometown of Louisville, Kentucky and then went on to receive a B. at Fisk University in 1911, an M. in economics at Yale University in 1913, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1925.
Wesley served on the Howard University faculty from 1913 to 1942.
Wesley served as director of the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum in Philadelphia from its opening in 1974 to 1976.
www.aaregistry.com /african_american_history/465/Charles_Wesley_an_early_promoter_of_Black_studies   (332 words)

  
 Charles Wesley
Because two of her sons, John Wesley and Charles Wesley, as children consciously or unconsciously will, applied the example and teachings and circumstances of their home life.
Their early purpose was to help people reshape their own lives for the better and almost before John and Charles knew it, they were shaping a movement that would reform not only individuals, but the church and the society of England.
Wesley, putting aside Laurence Sterne's Sentimental Journey (a book he described as marked by: "oddity, uncouthness, and unlikeness to all the world") took up instead Some historical account of Guinea, a work of anti-slavery by the Philadelphia Quaker, Anthony Benezet.
hubpages.com /hub/Charles_Wesley   (1474 words)

  
 Charles Wesley Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Charles Wesley was born on Dec. 18, 1707, the eighteenth child of the rector of the Anglican church in Epworth, Lincolnshire.
Along with his brother and their "Methodist" friends from Oxford, Wesley preached that the value of one's life is to be measured by his faith and decent sober conduct, rather than by his church attendance.
After Wesley married in 1749, he lived for a while in Bristol, where opposition to his ideals was less severe, but 12 years later he resumed his preaching in London.
www.bookrags.com /biography/charles-wesley   (462 words)

  
 Hymnology: Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley (1707-1788) is one of the most important and prolific hymn writers in the English language.
Charles Wesley, an English clergyman, poet, and hymn writer, was born at Epworth, Lincolnshire, England, on December 18, 1707.
Charles Wesley wrote approximately 6500 hymns, many of which are among the finest hymns in the English language.
www.smithcreekmusic.com /Hymnology/Wesleys/Charles.Wesley.html   (917 words)

  
 Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley was the eighteenth and last child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley.
In 1735, Charles was ordained as a deacon in the Church of England; shortly thereafter he sailed for Georgia as a missionary to the new colony.
Charles was just as involved and instrumental in spreading and sustaining the Methodist movement as his brother, John Wesley.
hymnuts.luthersem.edu /hcompan/writers/wesleyc.htm   (508 words)

  
 WESLEY, CHARLES. Psalms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Charles Wesley, an English clergyman, poet, and hymn writer, was born at Epworth, Lincolnshire, England, on December 18, 1707.
The group, later taken over by John Wesley, was ridiculed and derisively referred to as the "Methodists." In 1735 Charles was ordained an Anglican priest and, at John's insistence, sailed with him to the colony of Georgia.
Charles remained faithful to the Church of England and was angered when John began ordaining preachers for service in Scotland and America.
www.pitts.emory.edu /Archives/text/mss159.html   (366 words)

  
 Christian History - Charles Wesley - 131 Christians Everyone Should Know
Charles Wesley was the eighteenth of Samuel and Susannah Wesley's nineteen children (only 10 lived to maturity).
In 1735 Charles joined his brother John (they were now both ordained), to become a missionary in the colony of Georgia—John as chaplain of the rough outpost and Charles as secretary to Governor Oglethorpe.
Charles continued to travel and preach, sometimes creating tension with John, who complained that "I do not even know when and where you intend to go." His last nationwide trip was in 1756.
www.christianitytoday.com /history/special/131christians/charleswesley.html   (1026 words)

  
 Glimpses bulletin #29: Charles Wesley makes revival music
John and Charles Wesley came from a Christian family; both their father Samuel, who was an Anglican minister, and their mother Susannah had a strong, godly influence on the boys.
Charles was educated at Westminster School and entered Christ Church at Oxford at the time when his older brother John was leaving to help in his father's church.
Charles and his friends sought a disciplined method of spiritual improvement; some ridiculed the group and called them methodists for their methodical ways.
chi.gospelcom.net /GLIMPSEF/Glimpses/glmps029.shtml   (950 words)

  
 OUP: Sermons of Charles Wesley: Wesley
Charles Wesley (1707-1788) is widely recognized as one of the greatest writers of the English hymn.
The importance of Charles, however, extends well beyond his undoubted poetic abilities, for he is a figure of central importance in the context of the birth and early growth of Methodism, a movement which today has a worldwide presence.
It was Charles rather than John who first experienced the 'strange warming of the heart' that characterised the experience of many eighteenth-century evangelicals; and in the early years it was Charles no less than John who sought to spread, mainly through his preaching, the evangelical message across England, Wales, and Ireland.
www.oup.co.uk /isbn/0-19-826949-8   (979 words)

  
 Charles Wesley, poet and hymn writer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Some have described Charles Wesley as the "first Methodist." They point out that he was the one who first brought together a group of like-minded Christians to the "Holy Club" at Oxford.
He notes that though Charles formed a small group at Oxford, it was not the one known later as the "Holy Club" First in chronology does not mean first in leadership.
Charles Wesley not only wrote hundreds of hymns, a number of which are still sung today, but he was also a poet.
gbgm-umc.org /umw/wesley/quiz/6a.stm   (381 words)

  
 Susanna Wesley - Portraits of Great Christians - In Touch Ministries   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Susanna Wesley lived just long enough to see the fruits of her work; two months before she died in July 1742, her son John preached a series of revival messages in their home town of Epworth, England, to the biggest crowds that area had ever seen.
The blossoming ministry of John and Charles would impact generations to come for the Gospel of Christ.
She was as pretty and captivating on the outside as she was in her heart, and the young Samuel Wesley was quick to notice.
www.intouch.org /myintouch/mighty/portraits/susanna_wesley_213595.html   (867 words)

  
 Charles Wesley   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Charles Wesley's life was on December 18th 1707, the third surviving son and the eighteenth child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley.
Charles returned within a year but he had been impressed with the Moravians in Georgia and he met their leader, Count Zinzendorf, in London.
By this time, George Whitefield's ministry was having an astonishing impact and both Charles and John Wesley were enthralled at effect of open-air ministry in front of large crowds and both of them engaged in it.
www.christianheroes.com /ev/ev019.asp   (427 words)

  
 Charles Wesley A short biography of Charles Wesley Believersweb.org
  Some have described Charles Wesley as the "first Methodist." They point out that he was the one who first brought together a group of like-minded Christians to the "Holy Club" at Oxford.
He notes that though Charles formed a small group at Oxford, it was not the one known later as the "Holy Club" First in chronology does not mean first in leadership.
  Charles Wesley not only wrote hundreds of hymns, a number of which are still sung today, but he was also a poet.
www.believersweb.org /view.cfm?ID=1060   (173 words)

  
 Our Debt to Charles Wesley
Hymnologist Eric Routley writes, "The gates that Watts had opened, Wesley joyously entered; and the field that Watts sowed he reaped, literally, a hundredfold." These "gates and fields" Routley describes were the full expression of congregational song in the church.
Charles' hymns are a wealth of biblical theology and sound doctrine.
However, both John and Charles had been profoundly influenced by their experiences with the Moravians, who sang with passion and focused on the more subjective aspects of the Christian faith.
www.crosswalk.com /1108746   (683 words)

  
 Amazon.com: "Charles Wesley": Key Phrase page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Clarke is very justly scan- dalized at the epitaph which Charles Wesley w ote for her tomb, and which represents her as in "a legal night" till her seventieth year-a period at...
Clarke is very justly scandalized at the epitaph which Charles Wesley wrote for her tomb, and which represerts her as in "a legal night" till her seventieth year-a period at which...
Clarke is very justly scandalized at the epitaph which Charles Wesley wrote for her tomb, and which represents her as in "a legal night" till her seventieth year-a period at which...
amazon.com /phrase/Charles-Wesley   (589 words)

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