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Topic: Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
  Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union
Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, 2000 O.J. (C 364) 1 (Dec. 7, 2000).
The right to asylum shall be guaranteed with due respect for the rules of the Geneva Convention of 28 July 1951 and the Protocol of 31 January 1967 relating to the status of refugees and in accordance with the Treaty establishing the European Community.
Rights recognised by this Charter which are based on the Community Treaties or the Treaty on European Union shall be exercised under the conditions and within the limits defined by those Treaties.
www1.umn.edu /humanrts/instree/europeanunion2.html   (2919 words)

  
 The European Union Charter on Fundamental Rights
The Charter on fundamental rights of the European Union (EU) is the fundamental act in the area of humanitarian rights, adopted by the European Union on December 7, 2000;it is a kind of European Union “Bill of Rights”.
The main idea of the Charter is the declaration of the principle that the European Union “places a person at the center of its activity by means of the introduction of citizenship in the Union and creation of a space of freedom, safety, and justice”.
Besides, whenever possible it provides for the constant addition of rights arising as a result of social progress and scientific and technological development; at the same time, it aspires to fix not the minimum level as it is usually accepted in international legal practice, but the highest achievable maximum level of their number and implementation.
eulaw.edu.ru /english/papers/eu_charter.htm   (644 words)

  
 EU Charter of Fundamental Rights - submission
A Charter on these lines would have an added value in clearly stating to people resident on the Union's territory that the Union's activities are at least as much linked to fundamental rights as are those of the Member States, all of which have signed and ratified the European Convention on Human Rights.
For example, consideration could be given to a right for Citizens of the European Union to vote in one of the member states to which they have a relationship at all levels in addition to their existing right to vote in the lowest level of local elections and in elections to the European Parliament.
Furthermore the European Union is bound by the Declaration No. 11 annexed to the Treaty of Amsterdam concerning the status of churches and philosophical and non confessional organisations.
www.cec-kek.org /English/cs-EUChartere.htm   (1606 words)

  
 Federal Union | Charter of Fundamental Rights
The Charter of Fundamental Rights and European citizenship
Of course, the Charter recognises that any European Union citizen resident in an EU Member State of which he or she is not a national may nevertheless vote or stand as a candidate in European or municipal elections under the same conditions as nationals of that State.
Further examples of this uneasiness can be found in articles such as those concerning such basic human rights as the right to life, to education, to liberty and security of person, the prohibition of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment, and others of a similar type.
www.federalunion.org.uk /europe/parrycharter.shtml   (1920 words)

  
 Charter of Fundamental Rights FAQ v4
The European Council of heads of government, meeting in Cologne in June 1999, decided to "establish a Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union in order to make their overriding importance and relevance more visible to the Union's citizens".
After all, the Charter was drafted by the Convention on the presumption that it would be legally binding upon the EU institutions and their agencies, including member state governments when they implement EU law and policy.
fundamental rights and freedoms as well as basic procedural rights guaranteed by the ECHR and as derived from the constitutional traditions common to the member states as well as the general principles of Community (or Union) law.
www.andrewduffmep.org /POLICY/CHARTER/charterfaq4.html   (1811 words)

  
 Human Rights   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Drawing on that case-law, the Single European Act refers in its Preamble to respect for the fundamental rights recognized in the constitutions and laws of the Member States, in the ECHR and in the European Social Charter.
The Union is founded on the principles of liberty, democracy, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and the rule of law, principles which are common to the Member States.
It includes rights of dignity (as the right to life), freedoms (respect for private and family life, freedom of assembly and of association), equality (respect for cultural, religious and linguistic diversity), solidarity, citizen rights, justice… and so on.
html.rincondelvago.com /human-rights.html   (1311 words)

  
 Spectre magazine online
At first sight the proposed Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union approvingly discussed by EU leaders in Biarritz last week may seem to be a step in the right direction for a European Union which appears increasingly out of touch with the ordinary men and women who live within its borders.
The question then is whether this Charter is likely to be an effective instrument for the furtherance of people’s rights in other countries, or for the protection of our own rights in instances where they are not fully enforced or respected.
The right to take action is given only insofar as it accords with national laws and practices, allowing member states to maintain any and all restrictions on these rights.
www.spectrezine.org /europe/meijeroneu.html   (1070 words)

  
 SCADPlus: The Charter of Fundamental Rights
The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, proclaimed in Nice on 7 December 2000, summarises the common values of the Member States of the European Union.
The Charter enhances legal security as regards the protection of fundamental rights, where in the past such protection was guaranteed only by the case law of the Court of Justice and Article 6 of the Treaty on European Union.
Chapter V also examines the specific situation of European citizens, referring to certain rights already mentioned in the treaties (freedom of movement and residence, the right to vote, the right to petition) and introducing the right to good administration.
europa.eu /scadplus/leg/en/lvb/l33501.htm   (1570 words)

  
 The Fundamental Rights of the European Union: Individual Rights or Welfare-State Privileges?
The charter’s preamble states that its purpose is to create a closer union among the peoples of Europe and to share a peaceful future based on common values.
The European Union, the preamble continues, is founded on the indivisible, universal values of human dignity, freedom, equality, and solidarity; it is based on the principles of democracy and the rule of law.
Article 11 affirms everyone’s right of freedom of expression, meaning the right of every individual to hold views and opinions even if they are not held by the majority and meaning that governmental authority may not abridge a person’s freedom to communicate and acquire information about any ideas he wishes to share or learn about.
www.fff.org /freedom/0101c.asp   (993 words)

  
 Factsheet : 02 - Charter of Fundamental Rights   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The June 1999 Cologne European Council decided that there was "a need, at the present stage of the Union's development, to establish a Charter of fundamental rights in order to make their overriding importance and relevance more visible to the Union's citizens".
The Council Conclusions said that such a Charter should contain "the fundamental rights and freedoms as well as basic procedural rights guaranteed by the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and derived from the constitutional traditions common to the Member States, as general principles of Community law".
Insofar as this Charter contains rights which correspond to rights guaranteed by the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, the meaning and scope of those rights shall be the same as those laid down by the said Convention unless this Charter affords greater or more extensive protection.
www.ibeurope.com /Fact/02chart.htm   (3480 words)

  
 The Constitutional future of EUROPE: A Transatlantic Dialogue
However, where rights, freedoms and principles are described, as in the Charter, as needing to occupy the highest level of reference values within all the Member States, it would be inexplicable not to take from it the elements which make it possible to distinguish fundamental rights from other rights.
The ECJ has held that the right to an effective remedy before a court of competent jurisdiction is based on the constitutional traditions common to the Member States and on the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.
For example, Article 37 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union of 18 December 2000 is devoted to the protection of the environment.
www.jeanmonnetprogram.org /conference_lapietra/ecfr.html   (3947 words)

  
 The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union
In December 2000, the European Commission, the Council and the Parliament jointly signed and proclaimed the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.
Chartering Europe: the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union a working paper aimed at interpreting the Charter, by Agustín José Menéndez, senior researcher at ARENA (Advanced Research on the Europeanisation of the Nation-State) (January 2001).
European Women’s Lobby (EWL) - Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU a position paper by the EWL praising the final draft of the Charter (November 2000).
www.hrcr.org /hottopics/eucharter.html   (650 words)

  
 International Law In Brief - December 2-8, 2000
European Union ("EU") leaders at their Nice summit signed the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union ("Charter") to inter alia strengthen the protection of fundamental rights in light of "changes in society, social progress and scientific and technological developments" by increasing their visibility.
The Charter prohibits inter alia the death penalty, eugenics, human cloning, collective expulsions, and extradition to a state where there is a "serious risk" of the person being subjected to the death penalty, torture or other inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.
The Charter recognizes and respects the rights of: 1) the elderly to "lead a life of dignity and independence and to participate in social and cultural life," (Art.
www.asil.org /ilib/ilib0332.htm   (1731 words)

  
 Sketch for a „Charter of Fundamental Rights in the European Union”
Sketch for a „Charter of Fundamental Rights in the European Union”
(2) Everyone has the right to free development of her or his personality, in so far as it does not violate the rights of others or is contrary to the basic-legal order of the European Union or the member states.
(1) Each human being in practice of her or his rights and liberties is only subject to those limitations which the law designates exclusively for the purpose of ensuring the acknowledgment and the respect for the rights and liberties of others or to emphasize a predominant public interest.
www.sozialimpulse.de /threefolding.net/textshtml/Charter.htm   (2630 words)

  
 European Union Charter of Fundamental Rights - 2000
The right to asylum shall be guaranteed with due respect for the rules of the Geneva Convention of 28 July 1951 and the Protocol of 31 January 1967 relating to the status of refugees and in accordance with the Treaty
The Union recognises and respects the entitlement to social security benefits and social services providing protection in cases such as maternity, illness, industrial accidents, dependency or old age, and in the case of loss of employment, in accordance with the procedures laid down by Community law and national laws and practices.
In order to combat social exclusion and poverty, the Union recognises and respects the right to social and housing assistance so as to ensure a decent existence for all those who lack sufficient resources, in accordance with the procedures laid down by Community law and national laws and practices.
bessel.org /eurchart.htm   (2505 words)

  
 HIC - Appeal for Housing Rights in the European Charter of Fundamental Rights
We are convinced that the most important rights, including the right to housing, must be an integral part of this Charter as an important step towards the construction of a Europe of and for all the people.
Our fears are that the adoption of a Charter that fails to recognize the right to housing will send negative signals to the European citizens, as well as to the governments of member-states and the candidate countries of the Union.
We refer to the paragraphs dealing with housing rights in the European Social Charter, in the constitutions and laws of many member-states of the European Union, in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights as well as numerous other documents among which three resolutions of the European Parliament.
www.hic-net.org /articles.asp?PID=232   (551 words)

  
 My Home Page
European nations have formulated the Charter of Fundamental Rights to legally assert and protect shared common values.
The Charter of Fundamental Rights is based on the indivisible and universal values of human dignity, civil liberties, equality and solidarity.
By specifying rules on fundamental rights, it moves beyond the current system of protecting fundamental rights, which is simply in the jurisdiction of the courts, and provides Union citizens with legal certainty.
www.angelfire.com /id/multicultural/europe.html   (351 words)

  
 *UPDATED* Health rights explored within a conference on fundamental rights - European Public Health Alliance
right to health and the right of access to healthcare which is guaranteed by Article 35 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.
This interactive workshop explored the fundamental right to health and the right of access to healthcare and drew conclusions for a rights-based approach to EU social policies.
Whilst we are trying to address the issues facing a number of disadvantaged communities in the workshop on the right to health, we have unfortunately not been able to include the issues of the groups you mention.
www.epha.org /a/1845   (636 words)

  
 Policy & Research - EU Developments - Charter of Fundamental Rights
Comments by the European Council on Refugees and Exiles (ECRE) on the right to asylum in the Draft Charter on Fundamental Rights of the European Union, May 2000, May 2000
UNHCR Comments on the Right of Asylum under the Draft Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, 22 May 2000.
Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (Charte 4487/00), 18 December 2000.
www.ecre.org /eu_developments/charter/index.shtml   (162 words)

  
 Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union - European Union - Equal Employment Opportunities
The objective is to make the fundamental rights of EU citizens at European level more visible and explicit.
The Charter can be referred to in order to challenge any decision taken by the Community institutions (European Commission, Council of Ministers of the European Union, European Parliament, etc.) and by Member States when implementing EU law, if the citizen feels their fundamental rights to have been violated by the actor concerned.
The Charter was drafted by a Convention set up following a decision by the heads of state and government of the Member States of the European Union at the European Council of Cologne in June 1999.
www.ilo.org /public/english/employment/gems/eeo/eu/com_furi.htm   (293 words)

  
 Charter of Fundamental Rights - How the Charter was drawn up - The drafting Convention
The European Council entrusted this task to an ad hoc body called a "Convention", made up of representatives of the heads of state and government, the President of the European Commission, Members of the European parliament and national Members of Parliament...
A member of the European Parliament, a member of a national Parliament, and the representative of the President of the European Council if not elected to the Chair, shall act as Vice-Chairpersons of the Body.
When the Chairperson, in close concertation with the Vice-Chairpersons, deems that the text of the draft Charter elaborated by the Body can eventually be subscribed to by all the parties, it shall be forwarded to the European Council through the normal preparatory procedure.
www.ucc.ie /social_policy/The_Drafting_Convention_charter01.htm   (645 words)

  
 EMU Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union Nice
Draft charter of fundamental rights of the European Union
To take two examples: it declares that everyone has a right to form and join a trade union to protect his interests, and that the employment of children is prohibited.
Tony Blair was under pressure last night to veto a new European charter of rights after losing the latest round of his fight to prevent new economic and social rights being included.
www.nejtillemu.com /nice.htm   (1080 words)

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