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Topic: Cherenkov effect


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In the News (Mon 27 May 19)

  
  Cherenkov effect - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-07-08)
Cherenkov radiation (also spelled Cerenkov) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a speed greater than that of light in the medium.
In nuclear reactors, the intensity of Cherenkov radiation is related to the frequency of the fission events that produce high-energy electrons, and hence is a measure of the intensity of the reaction.
Cherenkov radiation is also used to characterize the remaining radioactivity of spent fuel rods.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /cherenkov_effect.htm   (781 words)

  
 Cherenkov radiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cherenkov radiation (also spelled Cerenkov or sometimes Čerenkov) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a speed greater than that of light in the medium.
In fact, most Cherenkov radiation is in the ultraviolet spectrum - it is only with sufficiently accelerated charges that it even becomes visible; the sensitivity of the human eye peaks at green, and is very low in the violet portion of the spectrum.
In pool-type nuclear reactors, the intensity of Cherenkov radiation is related to the frequency of the fission events that produce high-energy electrons, and hence is a measure of the intensity of the reaction.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cherenkov_effect   (1148 words)

  
 Cherenkov effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cherenkov effect at the UMR's nuclear reactor (http://www.nuc.umr.edu/reactor/reactor.html)
Cherenkov radiation is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a speed greater than that of light in the medium.
The Cherenkov effect is used as a visual cue in Hollywood movies to announce radioactive materials.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Cherenkov_effect   (664 words)

  
 Pavel Alekseyevich Cherenkov - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Later Cherenkov was promoted to the section leader, and in 1940 he was awarded the degree of Doctor of Physico-Mathematical Sciences.
This Cherenkov effect, associated with charged atomic particles moving at velocities higher than the speed of light in the local medium, proved to be of great importance in subsequent experimental work in nuclear physics, and for the study of cosmic rays.
Cherenkov was awarded USSR State Prizes in 1946 (with Vavilov, Frank, and Tamm), in 1952, and 1977.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pavel_Alekseyevich_Cherenkov   (362 words)

  
 Cherenkov Radiation
Cherenkov and the theoretical interpretation by I. Tamm and I.
The Cherenkov effect involves radiation emitted by the medium under the action of the field of the particle moving in it.
Cherenkov light in the atmosphere is produced by charged particles traveling faster than the speed of the light in air.This emission is governed by the value of n, the refractive index, which is proportional to atmospheric density.
www.gae.ucm.es /~emma/tesina/node4.html   (925 words)

  
 CHERENKOV RADIATION FACTS AND INFORMATION
Cherenkov radiation (also spelled Cerenkov or sometimes Čerenkov) is electromagnetic_radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a speed greater than that of light in the medium.
In the figure, v is the velocity of the particle (red arrow), β is v/c, n is the refractive_index of the medium.
The Cherenkov radiation from these charged particles is used to determine the source and intensity of the cosmic ray, which is used for example in the Imaging_Atmospheric_Cherenkov_Technique (IACT), by experiments such as H.E.S.S. and MAGIC.
www.witwib.com /Cherenkov_radiation   (1102 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Cherenkov effect
The group velocity of a wave is the velocity with which the overall shape of the waves amplitude (known as the envelope of the wave) propagates through space.
In physics, the photon (from Greek φοτος, meaning light) is a quantum of excitation of the quantised electromagnetic field and is one of the elementary particles studied by quantum electrodynamics (QED) which is the oldest part of the Standard Model of particle physics.
Cherenkov effect image provided by and © the Nuclear Engineering Department (http://www.nuc.umr.edu/index.html) of the University of Missouri-Rolla (http://www.umr.edu/); used by kind permission of Dr. Akira T. Tokuhiro.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Cherenkov-effect   (1768 words)

  
 Cherenkov effect   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-07-08)
Cherenkov radiation results when a charged most commonly an electron exceeds the speed of light in dielectric medium through which it passes.
Intuitively the overall intensity of Cherenkov radiation proportional to the velocity of the inciting particle and to the number of such Unlike fluorescence or emission spectra that have characteristic spectral peaks Cherenkov is continuous.
The Cherenkov effect is used as a cue in Hollywood movies to announce radioactive materials.
www.freeglossary.com /Cherenkov_radiation   (1045 words)

  
 Rayonnement de Cherenkov - Wikipedia, l'encyclopédie libre   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-07-08)
Le rayonnement de Cherenkov résulte quand une particule chargée, le plus généralement un électron, excède la vitesse de la lumière dans un milieu diélectrique par lequel elle passe.
Le rayonnement de Cherenkov est également employé pour caractériser la radioactivité restante des barres de combustible épuisées.
Le rayonnement de Cherenkov de ces particules chargées est employé pour déterminer la source et l'intensité de rayon cosmique, qui est employé par exemple dans la technique atmosphérique de Cherenkov de formation image (IACT), par des expériences telles que H.e.s.s.
216.239.39.104 /translate_c?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&langpair=en%7Cfr&u=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherenkov_effect&prev=/language_tools   (1316 words)

  
 Pavel Alekseyevich Cherenkov   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-07-08)
It 1934, whilst working under S.I. Vavilov, Cherenkov observed the emission of blue light from a bottle of water subjected to radioactive bombardment.
This Cerenkov effect, associated with charged atomic particle s moving at velocities higher than the speed of light in the local medium, proved to be of great importance in subsequent experimental work in nuclear physics, and for the study of cosmic ray s.
Cherenkov was awarded USSR State Prizes in 1946 (with Vavilov, Frank, and Tamm), in 1951, and 1977.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Pavel_Alekseyevich_Cherenkov.html   (486 words)

  
 Pavel Alekseevich Cherenkov Biography / Biography of Pavel Alekseevich Cherenkov Biography Biography
The principal contribution of the Russian physicist Pavel Alekseevich Cherenkov (1904-1990) was the explanation of a certain pale bluish radiation as a consequence of high-speed electrons passing through refractive mediums.
Sergei Vavilov's 1934 paper, which appeared at the same time as the Cherenkov study, suggested that the gamma-ray-induced glow was due to the slowing down of the electrons in the water (an example of the bremsstrahlung process).
Cherenkov and Vavilov, together with Igor Evgenievich Tamm and Ilya Mikhailovich Frank, received the Stalin Prize in 1946 for their explanation, theory, and practical application of the Cherenkov radiation.
www.bookrags.com /biography-pavel-alekseevich-cherenkov/index.html   (603 words)

  
 Cherenkov Detectors   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-07-08)
The Cherenkov detectors in TIGER are responsible for determining the kinetic energy that of a particle entering the detector.
The principle of this effect is analogous to an airplane surpassing the sound barrier in air.
Since this effect is quite dependent on the charge of the incoming particle, two different nuclei entering TIGER with the same energy will emit different amounts of light into the Cherenkov boxes.
cosray2.wustl.edu /tiger/science/instrument/cherenkov   (556 words)

  
 CERN Courier - More light on the Cherenkov - IOP Publishing - article
Cherenkov radiation is one of the main techniques for particle identification, but details of the underlying theory are still under debate.
Cherenkov radiation derives its name from Pavel Cherenkov, who as a young PhD student at Moscow's Lebedev Institute in the early 1930s, was assigned by Sergei Vavilov the task of investigating what happens to the radiation from a piece of radium when it is immersed in a fluid.
After heroic investigations, where Cherenkov would typically prepare for a working day by staying in a totally dark room for one hour, he found that the radiation was produced by electrons and was essentially independent of the liquid used, thereby ruling out fluorescence.
www.cerncourier.com /main/article/38/9/4/1   (335 words)

  
 Geometry.Net - Nobel: Cherenkov Pavel Alekseyevich
This "Cerenkov effect", associated with charged atomic particles moving at velocities higher than the speed of light, proved to be of great importance in subsequent experimental work in nuclear physics and for the study of cosmic rays.
Cherenkov discovered that light is emitted by electrons as they pass through a transparent medium at a speed higher than the speed of light in that medium.
He discovered the Cherenkov radiation effect in 1934, when he was a research student at the Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Soviet Union, where he remained as a member and, from 1959, full professor.
www.988.com /nobel/cherenkov_pavel_alekseyevich.php   (1525 words)

  
 Theory of Relativity, Part 1: Special Relativity - Numericana   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-07-08)
Cherenkov Effect: When the speed of an electron exceed the celerity of light...
This was further studied between 1934 and 1937 by Pavel A. Cherenkov (1904-1990) who established, in particular, that the radiation came primarily from fast electrons disloged by Compton collisions with energetic gamma-rays.
Cherenkov radiation is entirely different from so-called bremsstrahlung, the electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle is accelerated (e.g., as it collides with atoms).
home.att.net /~numericana/answer/relativity.htm   (4088 words)

  
 Cherenkov effect   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-07-08)
The characteristic "blue of nuclear reactors is due to Cherenkov radiation.
Cherenkov radiation is used to detect high-energy particles.
Cherenkov radiation is also used to the remaining radioactivity of spent fuel rods.
www.freeglossary.com /Cerenkov_effect   (1045 words)

  
 Inside STACEE
The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new experiment dedicated to the study of GeV/TeV gamma rays from astrophysical sources.
By reflecting the Cherenkov photons to secondary mirrors on the central tower, the flashes can be recorded by a camera of photomultiplier tubes, which will turn the light into a measurable electric signal.
Cherenkov light from these air showers can be detected at ground level.
www.astro.ucla.edu /~stacee/staceehowitworks.html   (1068 words)

  
 Atmospheric Cherenkov light   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-07-08)
The first to realize that cosmic-ray air showers would produce enough Cherenkov light to be detectable was Blackett in 1948 and the first to detect this light were Galbraith and Jelley in the early 1950s.
In the 1950s and 60s Cherenkov light was used to study properties of air showers induced by cosmic rays (protons and heavier atomic nuclei).
A description of various other uses of Cherenkov radiation (mainly in particle physics) is summarized in that page.
www.mpi-hd.mpg.de /hfm/CosmicRay/ChLight/Cherenkov.html   (547 words)

  
 seminar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-07-08)
The long-term interaction of uniformly moving charged particles and an electromagnetic mode of a slow-wave waveguide is considered in terms of regular and/or reversed Cherenkov effect.
Coherent Cherenkov radiation is treated as an origin of beam loading in linear accelerators and a soruce of high-power radiation.
Simulated Cherenkov radiation in high-current devices and its potentialities are discussed.
www.lnf.infn.it /seminars/Lebedev_09_09_04.html   (75 words)

  
 A new unidentified very high energy gamma-ray source in our Galaxy
This effect is analogous to the supersonic bang that occurs when a plane travels faster than the speed of sound.
Cherenkov light is produced by very high energy particles such as cosmic rays or gamma rays that enter the Earth’s atmosphere.
By checking whether a given Cherenkov flash comes from a single direction or from all directions, one can distinguish whether it is produced by cosmic rays or by gamma rays.
www.innovations-report.com /html/reports/physics_astronomy/report-37765.html   (1047 words)

  
 [No title]
Fax (7-095) 938-22 51 The radiation of uniformly moving sources, and the concomitant phenomena such as the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect, transition radiation, etc., are discussed.
The effect is analysed by assuming that the law of motion of the load admits of neither Vavilov-Cherenkov nor bremsstrahlung radiation, and by taking the clamp of the elastic system as the inhomogeneity.
Both the radiation reaction spectrum and the break of the object-elastic system contact are considered.The practically important cases of periodically and randomly varying elastic parameters are examined, and resonance and instability conditions for the vibrations of the radiating object are found.
ufn.ioc.ac.ru /ufn96/ufn96_10/abst9610.txt   (996 words)

  
 Searching for gamma rays under dark desert skies
During the day, the solar facility's 220 heliostats, which are essentially adjustable mirrors, focus the light of the sun onto a 200-foot central tower, and this intense beam of visible light is used in solar energy research.
Because they are traveling faster than light, they generate the visual equivalent of a sonic boom, a faint blue glow, called Cherenkov radiation, that actually falls in the visible region of the spectrum.
Cherenkov radiation from a gamma ray is like a headlight beam streaming through the atmosphere -- by the time it reaches the ground, it has spread out to cover an area about 200 meters across.
chronicle.uchicago.edu /971023/stacee.shtml   (1077 words)

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