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Topic: Cherenkov radiation


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  Cherenkov radiation – FREE Cherenkov radiation Information | Encyclopedia.com: Facts, Pictures, Information!
Cherenkov radiation or Cerenkov radiation [for P. Cherenkov ], light emitted by a transparent medium when charged particles pass through it at a speed greater than the speed of light in the medium.
The effect, discovered by Cherenkov in 1934 while he was studying the effects of gamma rays on liquids and explained in 1937 by I. Tamm and I. Frank, is analogous to the creation of a sonic boom when an object exceeds the speed of sound in a medium.
On the threshold of Cherenkov astronomy; radiation of extremely high energy from several celestial objects is leading astronomers to extend their science's spectral range yet again.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Cherenk-rad.html   (841 words)

  
  Cherenkov effect
Cherenkov radiation is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a velocity greater than the speed of light in that material.
In nuclear reactors, the intensity of Cherenkov radiation is related to the frequency of the fission events that produce high-energy electrons, and hence is a measure of the intensity of the reaction.
Cherenkov radiation is also used to characterize the remaining radioactivity of spent fuel rods.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ch/Cherenkov_effect.html   (594 words)

  
 Cherenkov radiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cherenkov radiation (also spelled Cerenkov or sometimes Čerenkov) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a speed greater than the speed of light in that medium.
In pool-type nuclear reactors, the intensity of Cherenkov radiation is related to the frequency of the fission events that produce high-energy electrons, and hence is a measure of the intensity of the reaction.
Cherenkov radiation can also be used to determine properties of high-energy astronomical objects that emit gamma rays, such as supernova remnants and blazars.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cherenkov_radiation   (1208 words)

  
 Radiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Various types of radiation may be distinguished, depending on the properties of the emitted energy/matter, the type of the emission source, properties and purposes of the emission, etc. When used by the general public, the word "radiation" commonly refers to ionizing radiation.
Alpha radiation, composed of the nuclei of helium-4 atoms.
Cherenkov radiation, electromagnetic radiation by a particle moving through an insulating medium faster than the speed of light in that medium.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Radiation   (215 words)

  
 Cherenkov effect - the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cherenkov radiation (also spelled Cerenkov) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a speed greater than that of light in the medium.
Cherenkov radiation results when a charged particle, most commonly an electron, exceeds the speed of light in a dielectric mediumthrough which it passes.
The Cherenkov radiation from these charged particles is used to determine the source and intensity of the cosmic ray.Similar methods are used in very large neutrino detectors, such as the Super-Kamiokande.
www.myonlyebay.com /default.asp?t=Cherenkov_radiation   (746 words)

  
 Cherenkov effect   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cherenkov radiation is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a speed greater than that of light in the medium.
In the fig v is the velocity of the particle (red arrow), β is v/ c, n is the refractive index of the media.
The Cherenkov effect is used as a visual cue in Hollywood movies to announce radioactive materials.
www.abacci.com /wikipedia/topic.aspx?cur_title=Cherenkov_radiation   (687 words)

  
 Cherenkov radiation
The effect known as Cherenkov radiation was observed as a faint blue glow by Pavel Cherenkov in 1934 when he was asked to look at the effects of radioactivity in liquids.
The blue glow in the water surrounding nuclear reactors is Cherenkov radiation.
Although Cherenkov radiation is indeed a light equivalent of the sonic boom, there are also some essential differences.
math.ucr.edu /home/baez/physics/Relativity/SpeedOfLight/cherenkov.html   (710 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Cherenkov radiation (Physics) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cherenkov radiation or Cerenkov radiation [for P. Cherenkov], light emitted by a transparent medium when charged particles pass through it at a speed greater than the speed of light in the medium.
The effect, discovered by Cherenkov in 1934 while he was studying the effects of gamma rays on liquids and explained in 1937 by I. Tamm and I. Frank, is analogous to the creation of a sonic boom when an object exceeds the speed of sound in a medium.
Thus, by simply measuring the angle between the radiation and the path of the particles, the particles' speed may be determined.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/Cherenk-rad.html   (251 words)

  
 radiation — FactMonster.com
Acoustic radiation, propagated as sound waves, may be sonic (in the frequency range from 16 to 20,000 cycles per sec), infrasonic, or subsonic (frequency less than 16 cycles per sec), and ultrasonic (frequency greater than 20,000 cycles per sec).
Radiation is usually considered to travel from a source in straight lines, but its path may be affected by external factors; for instance, charged particles travel in curved paths in magnetic fields.
Cherenkov radiation - Cherenkov radiation or Cerenkov radiation[for P. Cherenkov], light emitted by a transparent...
www.factmonster.com /ce6/sci/A0840916.html   (347 words)

  
 Cherenkov radiation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cherenkov radiation (also spelled Cerenkov or sometimes Čerenkov) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a speed greater than that of light in the medium.
The Cherenkov radiation from these charged particles is used to determine the source and intensity of the cosmic ray, which is used for example in the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique (IACT), by experiments such as H.E.S.S. and MAGIC.
In a RICH detector a cone of Cherenkov light is produced when a high speed particle traverses a suitable medium, ofttimes called radiator.
www.punweb.com /article/Cherenkov_radiation   (1131 words)

  
 CERN Courier - More light on the Cherenkov - IOP Publishing - article
Cherenkov radiation is one of the main techniques for particle identification, but details of the underlying theory are still under debate.
The circle is the image of the Cherenkov radiation via the focusing lens, and the two elliptical bands are the Cherenkov radiation (the crystal has two different refractive indices).
Cherenkov radiation derives its name from Pavel Cherenkov, who as a young PhD student at Moscow's Lebedev Institute in the early 1930s, was assigned by Sergei Vavilov the task of investigating what happens to the radiation from a piece of radium when it is immersed in a fluid.
www.cerncourier.com /main/article/38/9/4/1   (335 words)

  
 Pavel Alekseevich Cherenkov Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
The principal contribution of the Russian physicist Pavel Alekseevich Cherenkov (1904-1990) was the explanation of a certain pale bluish radiation as a consequence of high-speed electrons passing through refractive mediums.
During the late 1920s a French scientist, L. Mallet, examined the spectrum of the bluish-white radiation and discovered it was continuous instead of lines or bands usually associated with fluorescence; he failed to uncover the origin of the glow.
Cherenkov and Vavilov, together with Igor Evgenievich Tamm and Ilya Mikhailovich Frank, received the Stalin Prize in 1946 for their explanation, theory, and practical application of the Cherenkov radiation.
www.bookrags.com /biography/pavel-alekseevich-cherenkov   (496 words)

  
 Einstein velocity addition
One of the valuable applications of Cerenkov radiation is in the detection of neutrinos and distintinguishing between different types of neutrinos.
Cerenkov radiation is emitted at all frequencies in the visible if it occurs in an optically transparent medium, but the energy per unit wavelength is proportional to the inverse cube of the wavelength.
Although the Cerenkov radiation can be produced at all forward angles less than the limiting angle as the particle slows down, in practice the emission is seen as a narrow cone with only a few degrees width.
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu /hbase/relativ/einvel.html   (867 words)

  
 Glossary : SLAC Virtual Visitor Center
Electromagnetic radiation is coherent when the photons are produced in such a way that they are in phase with one another and incoherent when the phases of the photons are random.
Ionizing radiation is radiation with enough energy so that during an interaction with an atom, it can remove tightly bound electrons from their orbits, causing the atom to become charged or ionized.
The radiation emitted by such particles is called synchrotron radiation and it is particularly intense and very directional when electrons traveling at close to the speed of light are bent in magnetic fields.
www2.slac.stanford.edu /vvc/glossary.html   (5645 words)

  
 Cherenkov radiation. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-07
or Cerenkov radiation [for P. Cherenkov], light emitted by a transparent medium when charged particles pass through it at a speed greater than the speed of light in the medium.
The light is emitted only in directions inclined at a certain angle to the direction of the particles’; motion dependent upon the particles’; momentum.
Thus, by simply measuring the angle between the radiation and the path of the particles, the particles’; speed may be determined.
www.bartleby.com /65/ch/Cherenk-rad.html   (202 words)

  
 Bambooweb: Cherenkov effect
In the fig v is the velocity of the particle (red arrow), β is v/c, n is the refractive index of the media.
However, it should be noted that even very radioactive materials do not glow in air - the particles are simply too slow - and that even in water a source may be producing a dose of radiation lethal in seconds without easily visible Cherenkov radiation.
Cherenkov effect image provided by and © the of the ; used by kind permission of Dr. Akira T. Tokuhiro.
www.bambooweb.com /articles/c/h/Cherenkov_effect.html   (714 words)

  
 Radiation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Radiation is another term for light, as in "ultraviolet radiation".
Radiation is also generated by charged particles, especially when they are moving very fast.
The main reason radiation is harmful is that it causes little defects in material, from human skin to metals, and causes matter to break down.
www.windows.ucar.edu /tour/link=/jupiter/magnetosphere/radiation.html   (239 words)

  
 Cherenkov Effect | World of Physics
Cherenkov was born in the Voronezh region of Russia on July 15, 1904.
It was at this institute that Cherenkov carried out the elaborate experiments that revealed the cause of the radiation that was eventually given his name.
Cherenkov concluded that the radiation was produced when high-speed charged particles pass through a material at a speed that is greater than the speed of light in the material.
www.bookrags.com /research/cherenkov-effect-wop   (444 words)

  
 Is there an equivalent of the sonic boom for light?
The effect known as Cherenkov radiation was observed as a faint blue glow by Pavel Cherenkov in 1934 when he was asked to look at the effects of radioactivity in liquids.
It is possible to detect the Cherenkov radiation as it forms circles on a surface and can be used to measure the speed and direction the particle was travelling in.
Although Cherenkov radiation is indeed a light equivalent of the sonic boom, there are also some essential differences.
www.weburbia.com /physics/cherenkov.html   (726 words)

  
 Atomic Rocket: Radiation
Calculate the surface area of a sphere centered on the radiation event, with a radius equal to the distance between ground zero and the unfortunate crewperson.
HVT is the depth required to reduce the radiation by one-half, and 1/e is the depth required to reduce the radiation to approximately 37% (specifically to 1/e where e is approximately 2.718).
So the theory is you calculate radiation flux from the atomic engine, multiply it by the appropriate attentuation factors of the shadow shield, and see of the resulting dose is within acceptable limts.
www.projectrho.com /rocket/rocket3ah.html   (7397 words)

  
 MAGIC - About IACTs
The radiation is emitted at a characteristic angle with the radiating particle, an angle which widens as the atmosphere thickens.
The radiated photons have an energy corresponding to a window of penetration, and arrive in large enough numbers on the surface of the earth to become an indirect image of the shower, allowing identification against backgrounds and reconstruction of the original particle's direction and energy.
The showering process and the generation of Cherenkov light in a foreward cone have two immediate experimental consequences: the light is spread over a large area, typically a circle with a diameter of 250m, and hence the light intensity per unit area on ground is low.
magic.mppmu.mpg.de /introduction/iact.html   (1276 words)

  
 Someone told me that Cherenkov radiation...
Someone told me that Cherenkov radiation is analogous to breaking the sound barrier.
Cherenkov detectors are also used to measure velocity accurately.
The blue glow is the Cherenkov light that is emitted by the electrons from beta decay going on in the nuclear fuel.
education.jlab.org /qa/radglow_01.html   (421 words)

  
 Coherent Effects for Charged Particles
As mentioned in the introduction, Cherenkov detectors are used primarily for identifying the type of a particle (whose momentum or energy is, at least approximately, known), rather than for tracking the position of the particle.
This is typically arranged by being sensitive to a certain range of Cherenkov angles, for example by having mirrors and/or baffles between the radiator and the light detector.
Ring-Imaging Cherenkov detectors use spherical mirrors to focus the cone of Cherenkov light into a ring on a position-sensitive light detector or array of detectors.
www.shef.ac.uk /physics/teaching/phy311/coherent.html   (853 words)

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