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Topic: Chesapecten Jeffersonius


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In the News (Mon 22 Apr 19)

  
  Virginia State Fossil   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Scallops are unique among bivalved molluscs in having ridges on their shells, which make the shells strong, and in having the ability to swim in spurts by clapping their shells together -- a rudimentary but effective defensive mechanism.
Although scallops as a group are common today, Chesapecten itself went extinct around 4 million years ago, possibly due to cooling of the oceans prior to the onset of the Ice Ages.
Chesapecten bears the distinction of being the first fossil from North America to be illustrated in a scientific publication, Martin Lister's 1687 Historiae Conchyliorum; however, it was not given a scientific name until 1824.
www.statefossils.com /va/va.html   (240 words)

  
  Term paper on Chesapecten Jeffersonius
It is the fossilized form of an extinct scallop that lived in the early pliocene epoch between four and five million years ago on Virginia's coastal plain.
In 1824, geologist John Finch gathered a large collection of mollusk fossils, including Chesapecten Jeffersonius from the vicinity of Yorktown, Virginia, and gave them to scientists at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (ANSP).
Chesapecten Jeffersonius (Outside) Scientist Thomas Say, at ANSP, described the species and named it Pecten jeffersonius to honor Thomas Jefferson.
www.termpapertopic.org /ch/chesapecten-jeffersonius.html   (128 words)

  
 Virginia Symbols, Fossil: Scallop - SHG Resources
Chesapecten bears the distinction of being the first fossil from North America to be illustrated in a scientific publication, Martin Lister's 1687 Historiae Conchyliorum; however, it was not given a scientific name until 1824 however Chesapecten jeffersonius (Say), 1824, was first described in 1694 by Martin Lister.
The other is Chesapecten jeffersonius, among the oldest and newest of Virginia's symbols.
The Chesapecten jeffersonius is hereby designated as the official fossil of the Commonwealth.
www.shgresources.com /va/symbols/fossil   (972 words)

  
 Department of Geology | Geology
The shell illustrated above is a ~4 million year old Chesapecten jeffersonius, the state fossil of Virginia.
This ancient scallop lived in shallow seas that once covered the Coastal Plain of Virginia.
Intgrating geology with technology is an important part of every class in the Geology Department.
www.wm.edu /geology   (80 words)

  
 Chesapecten jeffersonius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is the fossilized form of an extinct scallop, which lived in the early Pliocene epoch between four and five million years ago on Virginia's coastal plain.
Scientist Thomas Say, at ANSP, described the species and named it Pecten jeffersonius to honor Thomas Jefferson.
This page was last modified 15:43, 24 July 2006.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Chesapecten_jeffersonius   (158 words)

  
 Maryland Geological Survey: MARYLAND'S OFFICIAL STATE FOSSIL SHELL
It was labelled "a marilandia," or "from Maryland." (Contrary to what has appeared in print at least are far back as 1904, this fossil was not the first from North America to be so illustrated.
Ward, L.W. and Blackwelder, B.W., 1975, Chesapecten, a new genus of Pectinidae (Mollusca: Bilvalvia) from the Miocene and Pliocene of eastern North America: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 861, 24 p.
Ward, L. and Gilinsky, N. Ecphora (Gastropoda: Muricidae) from the Chesapeake Group of Maryland and Virginia: Notulae Naturae, Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, No. 469, 21 p.
www.mgs.md.gov /esic/fs/fs6.html   (1093 words)

  
 Fossil Sites in Virginia @ Planet Dinosaur
Pelecypods Ark and Astarte clam, some beautiful full formed Chesapecten nefrens (scallop).
Comments: This is a really fascinating site, and if you are patient and have a tidal chart you will find alot of stuff, there is a nominal fee to enter the park.
Fossils: Raysdental platesGastropods: Diodora (limpet), Ecphora (murex snail), Turritella plebia (turret snail).Pelecypods: Anadara (ark clam), Chesapecten jeffersonius (scallop), Placopecten clintonius (scallop), Venericardia (cardita clam), Coral: Septastrea.
planetdinosaur.com /fossils/states/virginia.htm   (278 words)

  
 Gay Today.com  (Home)
Recently the General Laws Committee of the Virginia Senate voted unanimously to make the Virginia big-eared bat that state’s official state bat.
Though Virginia already has 16 official emblems - including the state bird (cardinal), the state fish (brook trout), the state fossil (Chesapecten jeffersonius) and the state beverage (milk) - this is the first time it ever considered honoring a bat.
Delegate Jackie T. Stump (Democrat-Buchanan), who proposed the bill, praised the big-eared bat for its uncanny ability to “devour 600 mosquitoes per hour, helping prevent the spread of West Nile Virus.”
gaytoday.com /jjournal/virginiahams.asp   (740 words)

  
 Warner offers students some food for thought - The Washington Times: Metropolitan - January 31, 2005   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Stump, Buchanan Democrat, said recognition of the big-eared bat would help educate the public about Virginia's caves and the positive environmental role played by the insect-eating flying mammals that inhabit them.
Virginia already has 16 official emblems, ranging from the state flag to the state fossil, Chesapecten jeffersonius.
Efforts to expand the list have not always been warmly received.
washingtontimes.com /metro/20050130-103554-5984r.htm   (1211 words)

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