Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Chief (heraldry)


Related Topics

In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  Heraldry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A chief is a fess situated in the upper third of the shield.
The rare "chief couped" is a chief that falls short of reaching the dexter and sinister sides of the shield; the representation of Stonehenge in the arms of Sir Cecil Chubb, "the Baronet who owned Stonehenge and gifted it to the nation", show an example.
The diminutive of the bend sinister is the scarpe.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Heraldry   (3183 words)

  
 Probert Encyclopaedia: Heraldry (C)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
In heraldry, a chapournet is a chaperonnet or little hood, borne in a coat of arms to signify that the chief is divided by a bow-shaped line.
In heraldry a chevron is one of the nine honourable ordinaries, consisting of two broad bands of the width of the bar, issuing, respectively from the dexter and sinister bases of the field and conjoined at its centre.
In heraldry a cockatrice is a representation of the mythical cockatrice, a reptile with the head, wings, and legs of a bird, and tail of a serpent.
www.probertencyclopaedia.com /U1.HTM   (1609 words)

  
 HERALDRY - LoveToKnow Article on HERALDRY   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The heraldry writers are ready to note that when two rows are used countercompony is tile word in place of cheeky, and componycounter-compony in the case of three rows.
Chiefs and quarters are blazoned after the field and its contents, and the border, commonly an added difference, is taken last of all.
Heraldry ceased to play its part in military affairs, the badges and banners under which the medieval nobles retinue came into the field were banished, and even the tournament in its later days became a renascence pageant which did not need the painted shield and armorial trappers.
57.1911encyclopedia.org /H/HE/HERALDRY.htm   (19437 words)

  
 Probert Encyclopaedia: Heraldry (H)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Heraldry (H) In heraldry, hatchment is a sort of panel, upon which the arms of a deceased person are temporarily displayed.
In heraldry, haurient is said of a depiction of a fish which is in pale, with the head in chief as if rising for air.
Heraldry is the science of a herald's duties, or more commonly the knowledge of the forms, terms and laws which pertain to the use of armorial bearings or coats of arms.
www.probertencyclopaedia.com /UD.HTM   (1673 words)

  
 Chief - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In heraldry, a chief is a band of colour or metal making up the top (usually the top third or slightly less) of a shield.
The term "in chief" is also used in heraldry to refer to a position towards the top of the shield.
Chief is also used as an informal form of address for a supervisor or manager.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Chief   (231 words)

  
 Heraldry
It is important to note that a chief "enhanced" (which gives it a narrower appearance), as in the arms of Martin F. Matthews[1], is not a diminutive.
Probert[1], Guillim[1] and others say that if one chief is "surmounted of another" (one chief is charged on another chief) it will have the appearance of a chief divided by a line running along the upper part of the "chief".
Heraldry is still practised today, especially in monarchies such as the United Kingdom.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/h/he/heraldry.html   (2356 words)

  
 Heraldry Information - TextSheet.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Heraldry is the knowledge and art of describing coats of arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings.
Heraldry is still practiced today, especially in monarchies such as the United Kingdom.
There are also many people who are interested in heraldry as a hobby; many of them participate in the Society for Creative Anachronism and other such medieval revivals, not to mention micronationalism.
www.thegamedunge.sferahost.com /encyclopedia/h/he/heraldry.html   (1351 words)

  
 Episcopal Heraldry in the US
Central Pennsylvania (Harrisburg) argent a dove centered on a Celtic cross, in chief sable a crown of thorns between a crescent and a ball.
Connecticut (1784) has a saltire with crossed swords in chief midpoint and on an escutcheon at midpoint a key and crozier in saltire, with a chief of three vines (from the state arms), surmounted by a mitre.
Northwestern Pennsylvania (1911) argent on a pale 3 balls, a chief wavy azure and argent (for Lake Erie), surmounted by a mitre.
www.heraldica.org /topics/usa/episcopa.htm   (3668 words)

  
 GAELIC IRISH HERALDRY and HERALDIC PRACTICE
Heraldry, as we understand it in modern terms, was brought to Ireland by the Normans.
This was the beginning of heraldry, a system of identification that was enormously elaborated during the middle ages.
As heraldry became the main proof of nobility, all sorts of abuses worked their way into the system as social climbers and the newly rich tried to buy nobility by buying false genealogies that would qualify them for arms.
www.heraldry.ws /info/article03.html   (5612 words)

  
 Heraldry Available to The Clan Campbell Society (NA)
In all clans the Chief by tradition and courtesy allows members of his clan to wear his crest as a cap badge or brooch, the crest generally being of silver and always set within a circular belt and buckle, the motto of the chief being inscribed upon the belt.
Wearing the Chief's boar's head crest is, for Campbells, an expression of symbolic adherence to the Chief and, through him, to their clan.
The Chief went to considerable lengths and expense to obtain a grant of these arms from the Lord Lyon for the Federation so that each Society, who was a member of the Federation, could use these arms as a correct use of Scottish heraldry.
www.ccsna.org /jsep30.htm   (1355 words)

  
 Blair Heraldry
Heraldry, or Armory, developed in feudal Western Europe during the 12th Century as a means of identifying a Knight in battle.
However, it was and remains proper for members of the Family or Clan to use the Crest Badge of the Chief encircled by a belt and buckle.
The chief cadet is Blair of Ardblair, the present being Laurence Blair Oliphant.
www.blairsociety.org /heraldry.htm   (2006 words)

  
 Armorial Gold Heraldry Dictionary
When a Lion or other principal bearing is placed both on the Chief and on the Field, the Chief must be mentioned after the Field of which it is a part; as for instance Argent, a Chief Azure, a Lion Gules, crowned and armed Or.
Note there is a difference between Bearings in Chief and Ranged in Chief: one or more Bearings in Chief is said to express their position in the chief point of the Shield; but when, for instance, we say, three Torteauxes ranged in Chief, we mean, placed in a straight line, in form of a Chief.
When the head of a swan is born as a charge or otherwise in Heraldry, it is blazoned a swan's neck (not head) erased or couped, but this is not the custom in regard to any other species of bird whatsoever.
www.heraldryclipart.com /how-to-blazon.html   (2561 words)

  
 Heraldry   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
It is important to note that a chief "enhanced" (which gives it a narrower appearance), as in the arms of Martin F. Matthews, is not a diminutive.
Probert, Guillim and others say that if one chief is "surmounted of another" (one chief is charged on another chief) it will have the appearance of a chief divided by a line running along the upper part of the "chief".
Chiefs are more commonly seen, though not blazoned as, couped when within a tressure.
www.yotor.com /wiki/en/he/Heraldry.htm   (2485 words)

  
 The National Library of Ireland - Office of Chief Herald - Heraldry in Ireland
The heraldry of our Norman families is typical of early military heraldry: simple in design in order to facilitate recognition on the battlefield.
Heraldry may have been in use by the Gaelic Irish by the end of the twelfth century.
The old province of Meath, comprehending the present-day counties of Meath and Westmeath, is heraldically personified by a representation of a royal personage seated on a throne.
www.nli.ie /h_eire.htm   (1814 words)

  
 Coats of Arms in Ireland and from around the world
In general we are all individuals or small groups, passionately interested in the subject of heraldry and coats of arms, but not bogged down in centuries-old, outdated convention or prepared to sacrifice accuracy in order to make a sale.
For a quartered shield the segments are described as 1st (dexter chief), 2nd (sinister chief), 3rd (dexter base) and 4th (sinister base).
The "chief" is a horizontal band that occupies approximately the top one third of the shield area, although artists will often break the one third rule depending on the shield layout.
www.heraldry.ws /heraldry   (5347 words)

  
 Blazons of the Peers of Elizabethan England 1
Heraldry uses its own specialized language, as it has done since the 14th century.
quarterly gules and or, in dexter chief a mullet argent.
or, two bars azure a chief quarterly azure and gules in the first and fourth quarters two fleur-de-lys or; in the second and third quarters a lion passant guardant or.
www.renaissance.dm.net /heraldry/blazons.html   (401 words)

  
 Scottish Heraldry
All heraldry in Scotland is controlled by the Court of the Lord Lyon King of Arms, commonly known as the Lyon Court, and located at New Register House in Edinburgh.
This is in the wearing of the crest from the full coat of arms of your chief in the form of a badge surrounded by a belt and buckle containing the motto of the chief.
The chief of a family may use a coronet of four strawberry leaves (one plus two half leaves visible in a typical drawing) tinctured to indicate whether or not the chief is still in possession of the former estates.
www.clanmacrae.org /documents/heraldry.htm   (4060 words)

  
 Heraldry - Enpsychlopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
It can be associated with the fillet, a quite narrow horizontal band running along the bottom of the chief, [3] (http://www.btinternet.com/~paul.j.grant/guillim/s2/gu_s2c4.htm) although it can be difficult if not impossible sometimes to distinguish between a fillet and a chief fimbriated, as the fimbriation of a chief occurs only along the lower line.
It is important to note that a chief "enhanced" (which gives it a narrower appearance), as in the arms of Martin F. Matthews [6] (http://www.heraldry-scotland.co.uk/scotsarmsgal/gallery.asp?ID=132), is not a diminutive.
Probert [7] (http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/U1.HTM), Guillim [8] (http://www.btinternet.com/~paul.j.grant/guillim/s2/gu_s2c4.htm) and others say that if one chief is "surmounted of another" (one chief is charged on another chief) it will have the appearance of a chief divided by a line running along the upper part of the "chief".
www.grohol.com /wiki/Heraldry   (3211 words)

  
 Heraldry - free-definition   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
It can be associated with the fillet, a quite narrow horizontal band running along the bottom of the chief,[4] (http://www.btinternet.com/~paul.j.grant/guillim/s2/gu_s2c4.htm) although it can be difficult if not impossible sometimes to distinguish between a fillet and a chief fimbriated, as the fimbriation of a chief occurs only along the lower line.
It is important to note that a chief "enhanced" (which gives it a narrower appearance), as in the arms of Martin F. Matthews[5] (http://www.heraldry-scotland.co.uk/Homepage.htm), is not a diminutive.
Probert[6] (http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/U1.HTM), Guillim[7] (http://www.btinternet.com/~paul.j.grant/guillim/s2/gu_s2c4.htm) and others say that if one chief is "surmounted of another" (one chief is charged on another chief) it will have the appearance of a chief divided by a line running along the upper part of the "chief".
www.free-definition.com /Heraldry.html   (2556 words)

  
 Heraldry   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The first, and most important rule of heraldry in Renaissance is that the hues painted on the shields are divided into colors, metals, and furs.
The heraldry system of Renaissance is similar to that of English heraldry here on Earth, but with some additional colors and furs similar to some of those used in Europe.
When a device has both a chief and a bend, the bend normally is drawn from the angle formed by the chief and the right side of the device, rather than the top and right sides of the device, but this is not always the case.
members.aol.com /wkburger/Renaissance/Heraldry.html   (3181 words)

  
 The reading of heraldry (from heraldry) --  Encyclopædia Britannica   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
More results on "The reading of heraldry (from heraldry)" when you join.
Strictly defined, heraldry denotes that which pertains to the office and duty of a herald;...
In such societies written language is the chief means of transmitting culture and the benefits of civilization...
www.britannica.com /eb/article?tocId=8841   (930 words)

  
 Genealogy, Heraldry and Tartans
The Chief’s coat of arms fulfils within the clan or family the same purposes as the Royal Arms do in a Kingdom.
The arms are those of the Chief, and clansmen have only the privilege of wearing the strap-and-buckle crested badge to show they are such Chief’s clansmen.
The Crest of the Chief is worn by all members of the Clan and of approved Septs and followers of the Clan, within a strap and buckle surround bearing the Chief’s motto.
www.electricscotland.com /webclans/lordlyon_genhertar.htm   (1079 words)

  
 Heraldry today   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
In Scotland, whilst the armorial emblazon is held as the exclusive property of the clan chief, clansmen are permitted to display and wear the clan badge, usually the crest of the Chief's Coat of Arms.
He/she (the Chief) may elect to continue with the shield of his ancestors, but he/she is entitled to assume his own crest, hence clansmen must sometimes now acquire the new clan badge of their new Chief.
There was a tacit admission by the late Dr McLysaght, Chief Herald, that such a thing as a family name Coat of Arms does exist, and is applicable to all members of the sept. Commonality of application of Coat of Arms is almost impossible.
www.infokey.com /hon/herald.htm   (4883 words)

  
 Introduction to South African Heraldry: Family Heraldry
Per chevron raguly Or and Vert, in dexter chief an acorn and in sinister chief a protea both slipped and leaved, in base a bear sejant, all proper.
Or, on a fess between in chief nine billets fesswise 5 and 4 and in base six billets fesswise 3, 2 and 1 Gules, a demi-lion rampant of the field.
He was the Chief Archivist, a well-known historian, and a founder of the Heraldry Society.
www.geocities.com /heraldrysa/1-famg1.htm   (975 words)

  
 Roll of Arms of rec.heraldry
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Gules, a swan rousant Argent, beaked and legged Or, in dexter chief a mullet Or; 2nd and 3rd, Azure, a sword in bend Argent, hilted and pommeled Or, between two hunting horns stringed Or, virolled Gules.
Per chevron wavy in chief per pale azure and sable and in base argent, i n chief an estoile or and in base a bell sable accompanied by two barrulets wavy crestd to the sinister on the upper edge per pale asure and sable.
Vair on a Chief Argent a Dragon courant Gules.
jgrimbert.free.fr /herald/rh   (3612 words)

  
 English Heraldry and Blazon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
By the mid-twelfth century, heraldry had emerged in both England and Europe, and by the second half of the thirteenth century, coats of arms were being recorded by heralds in rolls of arms.
The top of the shield is termed the chief, its bottom the base; the right side (from the knight's perspective), dexter; the left, sinister.
The lines of partition that divide the field need not be plain but can be ornamental, although in early heraldry, there were fewer lines of partition and their meaning was less exact; indented, for example, a version with three indentations called dancetty, and undy or wavy all were regarded as the same.
itsa.ucsf.edu /~snlrc/britannia/flowers/heraldry.html   (1116 words)

  
 The Heraldry of Clan Dixon
isbet in his Heraldry (Edinburgh, 1722) says the Dicksons are descended from one Richard Keith, said to be a son of the family of Keiths Earls Marshall of Scotland, and in proof thereof carry in their arms the chief of Keith Marischal.
The Lyon's register as early as 1672 acknowledges Dickson descendancy from Keith Marischal and continue in most cases, with the star figures seen earlier.
With some Dickson's difference is achieved by color reversals (object and background colors switched) and by other color changes, whiles figures and their placement remain the same as in Inneresk.
www.clankeith.org /fhaoilgeal/dixonheraldry.htm   (377 words)

  
 Maxwell Heraldry
This is an introduction to the heraldry of the Maxwell family.
The rules of heraldry are quite complex for the novice but if you remember that a coat of arms can only be owned by a single person at a time, then you know the most important rule of heraldry.
The Chief of the Maxwell family started to use his distinctive armorial late in the twelfth century.
www.maxwellsociety.com /History/heraldry.htm   (1130 words)

  
 The Quartermaster Heraldic Section
But it was not until 1919 that the heraldry activity was established as a separate function within the Army General Staff.
Colonel Robert E. Wyllie, Chief of the equipment branch of the General Staff was made responsible for military heraldry.
Staffing of the Heraldic Section and later the Institute of Heraldry, was (and still is) almost exclusively civilian with many staff members spending a lifetime with the organization.
www.qmfound.com /heraldry.htm   (992 words)

  
 Armorial Gold Heraldry Art
All heraldry clipart is hand-drawn by our artists to provide for smooth lines, and the Heraldry art reference material is from only original Heraldry art manuscripts.
The Heraldry Clipart collection is the largest available anywhere and the art is only available on this site.
Heraldry art samples are provided as a courtesy to potential buyers and the heraldry samples remain the property of Armorial Gold Heraldry Services.
www.heraldryclipart.com   (343 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.