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Topic: Children of Gebelawi


  
  deseretnews.com | Nobel winner Mahfouz dies
In 1994, an Islamic militant stabbed the then-82-year-old Mahfouz, accusing him of blasphemy because of one his novels, "Children of Gebelaya," a religious allegory that depicted Islam's main prophet, Muhammad.
The 1959 "Children of Gebelawi" — or "Children of Our Alley" by its Arabic title — told the story of a family patriarch and his sons, who represent the series of prophets that Islam believes includes Jesus and Moses and culminates in Muhammad.
"Children of Gebelawi" will be republished along with all Mahfouz's other works next year, his publisher said.
deseretnews.com /dn/view/0,1249,645197492,00.html   (1119 words)

  
 Nobel Prize winner Naguib Mahfouz passes away
Technorati tags: Naguib Mahfouz, Nobel Prize, Egypt, Salman Rushdie, Omar Abdul-Rahman, Children of Gebelawi, Children of Gebelaawi, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis, allegory, al-Azhar
Children of Gebelawi is an allegorical tale of life in an alley, where four men try to carve out a life amidst the chaos:
Children of Gebelaawi was first published in serialized form in the Egyptian newspaper al-Ahram (September 21 to December 25, 1959).
www.stevejanke.com /archives/194648.php   (1220 words)

  
 Children of Gebelawi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Children of Gebelawi (Original Arabic title: أولاد حارتنا, Egyptian dialect transliteration: Awlad Haretna, formal Arabic transliteration: Awlad Haratina, meaning Children of our alley) alternative titles: Children of the Alley; transliterated Arabic: '') is a novel by the Egyptian writer and Nobel laureate Naguib Mahfouz.
It was originally published in Arabic in 1959 in serialised form in the Cairo daily Al-Ahram.
December 1999, paperback (as Children of the Alley -Theroux's translation)
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Children_of_Gebelawi   (373 words)

  
 The 94-year-old author is about to finally release in Egypt Children of Gebelawi, a hotly controv... Mahfouz seeks ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The 94-year-old author is about to finally release in Egypt Children of Gebelawi, a hotly controv...
The 94-year-old author is about to finally release in Egypt Children of Gebelawi, a hotly controversial chronicle drenched in religious symbolism of a man who casts out his children and puts a curse on his family.
The Children of Gebelawi is set in an imaginary Cairo alley and follows the hardships of Egyptian suburban life.
www.funnylovers.com /node/442   (427 words)

  
 Mahfouz seeks clerical blessing for 'blasphemous' novel -- Middle East Times
At the time of its serialization in 1959, the book upset Muslim scholars who read it as blasphemous, while the regime of Gamal Abdel Nasser argued that the book was directed against the former leader.
The Children of Gebelawi was first published in serialized form in Egypt's top-selling state-owned daily Al Ahram.
But it is also a deeply symbolic recreation of the history of monotheistic religions, with each of the major characters symbolizing a religious figure.
www.metimes.com /print.php?StoryID=20060117-030539-7672r   (512 words)

  
 FOXNews.com - Nobel Prize Winner Naguib Mahfouz Dies - Celebrity Gossip | Entertainment News | Arts And Entertainment
The 1959"Children of Gebelawi"_ or"Children of Our Alley"by its Arabic title _ told the story of a family patriarch and his sons, who represent the series of prophets that Islam believes includes Jesus and Moses and culminates in Muhammad.
The militant who stabbed Mahfouz said at his trial he had never read the book but was inspired by the fatwa.
"Children of Gebelawi"will be republished along with all Mahfouz's other works next year, his publisher said.
www.foxnews.com /wires/2006Aug30/0,4670,ObitMahfouz,00.html   (1101 words)

  
 Naguib Mahfouz
Then, in 1959, Mahfouz serialized one of his most unusual novels, The Children of Gebelawi, in the pages of Al-Ahram.
Despite the notoriety that Children of Gebelawi attracted, Mahfouz considers the trilogy to be his most important work by far.
Children of Gebelawi is still unpublished in full in Arabic, and until he won the Nobel Prize his works were banned in many Arab countries because of his outspoken support for President Anwar Sadat's Camp David peace treaty with Israel.
almashriq.hiof.no /egypt/900/920/naguib_mahfouz/nobel_price   (1594 words)

  
 Middle East Online
Egypt's Nobel prize-winning writer Naguib Mahfouz is seeking the endorsement of Sunni Islam's highest authority before re-releasing a novel that was condemned as blasphemous when first serialised nearly half a century ago, friends said.
At the time of its serialisation in 1959, the book upset Muslim scholars who read it as blasphemous, while the regime of Gamal Abdel Nasser argued the book was directed against the former leader.
The Children of Gebelawi was first published in serialised form in Egypt's top-selling state-owned daily Al-Ahram.
www.middle-east-online.com /english/?id=15501   (559 words)

  
 The Hindu : Magazine / Tribute : Between civilisations
Indeed it could, very appropriately, be the leitmotif of Indian novelists, faced with the challenge of reconciling multiple histories and identities in their work.
It was in the throes of one of these reconciliations, which resulted in the novel Children of Gebelawi, that Mahfouz had his Salman Rushdie moment — except that it came much before Rushdie's own excoriations, and that it was not so much a moment as 30 years of opposition.
As with The Satanic Verses, the fate of Mahfouz and Children of Gebelawi became the trigger for an intense debate on freedom of expression.
www.hindu.com /thehindu/mag/2006/09/17/stories/2006091700040200.htm   (671 words)

  
 Naguib Mahfouz
The Children of Gebelaawi (1959) portrayed the patriarch Gebelaawi and his children, average Egyptians living the lives of Cain and Abel, Moses, Jesus, and Mohammed.
Gebelaawi has built a mansion in an oasis in the middle of a barren desert; his estate becomes the scene of a family feud which continues for generations.
Children of Gebelaawi, 1959 - Children of the Alley (trans.
www.kirjasto.sci.fi /mahfouz.htm   (1748 words)

  
 Las Vegas SUN: Nobel Prize Winner Naguib Mahfouz Dies
It was his 1959 novel "Children of Our Alley," or "Children of Gebelawi," that brought him the most controversy.
In a copycat fatwa the same year, Egyptian radical Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman - later convicted of plotting to blow up New York City landmarks, including the United Nations - said Mahfouz deserved to die for "Children of Gebelawi." The writer's attacker five years later was inspired by the fatwa.
His position raised an outcry among many novelists who said he was bending to religious censorship - but it reflected his non-confrontational style and desire to see consensus.
www.lasvegassun.com /sunbin/stories/text/2006/aug/30/083008988.html   (1056 words)

  
 Naguib Mahfouz Dies   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Mahfouz was awarded the 1988 Nobel Prize in literature for Children of Gebelawi.
His books were banned in many Arab countries because of his outspoken support of Anwar Sadat's peace treaty with Israel, but that changed after he won the Nobel Prize.
In fact, Children of Gebelawi was banned in Egypt for alleged blasphemy concerning the portrayal of God in allegorical form.
www.suite101.com /blog.cfm/readingandwriting/naguib_mahfouz_dies   (122 words)

  
 SignOnSanDiego.com > News > World -- Naguib Mahfouz, the first Arab Nobel winner in literature, dies at 94
The trilogy introduced a character who became an icon in Egyptian culture: Si-Sayed, the domineering father who lords his authority over his wives and daughters but holds the family together – a character Mahfouz drew from his own father.
In a copycat fatwa the same year, Egyptian radical Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman – later convicted of plotting to blow up New York City landmarks, including the United Nations – said Mahfouz deserved to die for “Children of Gebelawi.” The writer's attacker five years later was inspired by the fatwa.
His position raised an outcry among many novelists who said he was bending to religious censorship – but it reflected his non-confrontational style and desire to see consensus.
www.signonsandiego.com /news/world/20060830-0618-obit-mahfouz.html   (1105 words)

  
 Naguib Mahfouz - ArticleWorld
In 1959, Children of Gebelawi was banned from Egypt for being sacrilege.
The blasphemous novel drew attention again in late 1980s when Indian novelist Salman Rusdie released The Satanic Verses, a novel that was banned in several countries for its impertinent representation of the prophet Muhammad.
Egyptian theologian Omar Abdul-Rahman said that if Mahfouz had been punished for Children of Gebelawi, Rushdie never would have published The Satanic Verses.
www.articleworld.org /index.php/Naguib_Mahfouz   (199 words)

  
 EgyptElection.com - Prayers held for Egyptian writer Mahfouz
The 1959 "Children of Gebelawi" — or "Children of Our Alley" by its Arabic title — told the story of a family patriarch and his sons.
He said Mahfouz deserved to die for his novel, and in 1994 an Islamic militant stabbed the author, saying "Children of Gebelaya" was blasphemous.
It had issued a statement Wednesday saying "Children of Gebelawi" was a "violation" of Islamic tenets.
egyptelection.com /content/view/485/29   (721 words)

  
 Naguib Mahfouz, 94, Novelist and Nobelist - August 31, 2006 - The New York Sun
Late in life he aroused the wrath of Islamic militants and was fortunate to survive an assassination attempt in 1994.
Mahfouz was born on December 11, 1911, the youngest of seven children of a minor civil servant, and grew up in the Gamaliyya quarter of old Cairo.
His childhood was colored by the period of intense nationalist activity that led to the 1919 revolution, and he witnessed British troops firing on independence demonstrators outside his own home.
www.nysun.com /article/38922   (536 words)

  
 Nobel Prize in Literature 1988 - Press Release
The theme of the unusual novel Children of Gebelawi (1959) is man's everlasting search for spiritual values.
It is the scientist who ultimately is responsible for the primeval father Gebelawi's (God's) death.
Different norm systems are confronted with tension in the description of the conflict between good and evil.
nobelprize.org /nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1988/press.html   (466 words)

  
 Characters   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
His father died before Isaac was born and left the family with little money.
Isaac's mother soon remarried and had three more children.
She expected Isaac to manage her considerable property after she was widowed a second time.
www.angelfire.com /pro/mostafa89/characters.htm   (529 words)

  
 Lone Arab Nobel winner in literature dies
In 1994, an Islamic militant stabbed the then-82-year-old Mahfouz, accusing him of blasphemy because of one his novels, Children of Gebelawi, a religious allegory that depicted Islam's main prophet, Muhammad.
The Nobel prize, which he won in 1988, introduced to the world a man seen by many as the Middle East's greatest writer, with 34 novels, hundreds of short stories and essays, dozens of movie scripts and five plays over a 70-year career.
Mahfouz's literary prominence, modesty and irrepressible sense of humor enabled him to unite Arabs from across the political spectrum, even those who differed with his backing for normalization of ties with Israel after Egypt signed the 1979 Camp David peace accords.
www.azcentral.com /arizonarepublic/local/articles/0831death31.html   (406 words)

  
 Al-Ahram Weekly | Special | An exemplary humanist
He experimented with new forms in Awlad Haratina (The Children of Gebelawi), Al-Tariq (The Search), Miramar and Al-Liss wal-Kilab (The Thief and the Dogs).
He never owned a car though each one of his children have one.
He was never impatient with people who stopped him to shake his hand or wanted to take their photograph with him.
weekly.ahram.org.eg /2006/810/sc12.htm   (902 words)

  
 Naguib Mahfouz   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The youngest of seven children of a lower-rank civil servant, he acquired a sound knowledge of both medieval and modern Arabic literature while still in high school.
In the changed political climate following the overthrow of Egypt's monarchy in 1952, Mahfouz's al-Thulathiyya (The Cairo Trilogy, 1956-1957), an extended three-volume consideration of Egyptian life in the first half of the 20th century, became an immediate and enduring success.
Having written al-Thulathiyya in the early 1950s (some time passed between the work's writing and its publication), Mahfouz did not write again for publication until 1959, when his novel Awlad haratina (Children of Gebelawi, 1981) was published.
library.thinkquest.org /C007680/naguib.html   (408 words)

  
 Naguib Mahfouz: An Appreciation
But in 1992 he appeared to shift his position slightly, saying that, while the fatwa was intolerable, Rushdie's novel was "insulting" to Islam.
Why Mahfouz, who in 1959 produced a novel (Children of Gebelawi) that portrays God, Adam, Moses, Jesus and Muhammad as mere mortals, should have found The Satanic Verses to be offensive is a bit of a mystery.
In 1994 he was stabbed in the neck and as a result of his injury he was unable to hold a pen or a pencil in his writing hand.
www.thenation.com /doc/20060918/mahfouz   (834 words)

  
 Using Middle Eastern Literature and Allusions in Class
Children of Gebelawi is an allegory, and students easily see that the characters are based on Adam and Eve, Moses, Jesus and Mohammad, and a modern scientist similar to Einstein.
In evaluating the class, students strongly favored keeping Children of Gebelawi in the curriculum.
Philip Stewart, who translated The Children of Gebelawi, reports that he has made less than 200 Egyptian pounds (about $400) from his work to date (Rodenbeck, "The Art of Translation," Cairo Today).
www.vccaedu.org /inquiry/vcca-journal/good.html   (4288 words)

  
 AP Wire | 08/30/2006 | Nobel prize winner Naguib Mahfouz dies
Win tickets to a special screening of Children of Men!
CAIRO, Egypt - Naguib Mahfouz, the first Arab writer to win the Nobel Prize in literature, died Wednesday at the age of 94, bringing tributes from literary figures and world leaders for an author who became a symbol of liberalism in the face of Islamic extremism.
The 1959 "Children of Gebelawi" - or "Children of Our Alley" by its Arabic title - told the story of a family patriarch and his sons, who represent the series of prophets that Islam believes includes Jesus and Moses and culminates in Muhammad.
www.twincities.com /mld/twincities/entertainment/15394966.htm   (1126 words)

  
 Mahfouz seeks clerical blessing for 'blasphemous' novel - Culture - Middle East Times
BLESSING: Egypt's Nobel Literature laureate Naguib Mahfouz is about to finally release in Egypt ‘Children of Gebelawi’, a hotly controversial chronicle drenched in religious symbolism of a man who casts out his children and puts a curse on his family.
Mahfouz is seeking the endorsement of Sunni Islam’s highest authority.
CAIRO -- Egypt's Nobel prize-winning writer Naguib Mahfouz is seeking the endorsement of Sunni Islam's highest authority before re-releasing a novel that was condemned as blasphemous when first serialized nearly half a century ago, friends said.
www.metimes.com /articles/normal.php?StoryID=20060117-030539-7672r   (645 words)

  
 Labor Party Pakistan | Israel's Dual Onslaught On Lebanon And Palestine   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The attacker was acting upon the advice of Shaikh Omar Abdur Rehman (now serving jail term in USA on terrorism charges) who thought Salman Rushdie would not have dared pen down Satanic Verses had Mahfouz not written his Awlad Haritna (Children of Gebelawi to English readers).
But the controversy that marked his life and proved fatal was around 'Children of Gebelawi'.
In a copycat fatwa the same year, Sheik Omar Abdur Rahman said Mahfouz deserved to die for 'Children of Gebelawi'.
www.laborpakistan.org /articles/intl/naguibmahfouz.php   (1390 words)

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