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Topic: Chinese characters of Empress Wu


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In the News (Mon 22 Apr 19)

  
  ipedia.com: Chinese character Article
Chinese characters are used to varying degrees in the written forms of the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages (though the latter only in South Korea).
Chinese characters have disappeared from Vietnamese — where they were used until the 20th century — and North Korea, where they have been completely replaced by Hangul.
Chinese characters (漢字) are called hànzì in Chinese, kanji in Japanese, hanja or hanmun in Korean, and hán tư (also used in the chu nom script) in Vietnamese.
www.ipedia.com /chinese_character.html   (2127 words)

  
  Chinese character - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Chinese characters or Han characters (Traditional Chinese: 漢字; Simplified Chinese: 汉字; pinyin: Hànzì) are logograms used in the written forms of the Chinese language, and to varying degrees in the Japanese and Korean languages (though the latter only in South Korea).
Chinese characters are called hànzì in Mandarin Chinese, kanji in Japanese, hanja or hanmun in Korean, and hán tự (also used in the chu nom script) in Vietnamese.
This is possible because the phonetic system of Chinese allows for many words to have the same pronunciation (homonymy), and because the consideration of phonetic similarity used in a character generally ignores its tone and the manner of articulation of its initial consonant (but not the place of articulation).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Chinese_character   (4368 words)

  
 Empress Wu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Her father was Wu Shihuo (武士彠) (577-635), a member of a renowned aristocratic family of Shanxi, and an ally of Li Yuan, the founder of the Tang Dynasty, in his conquest of power (Li Yuan was himself from a renowned aristocratic family of Shanxi).
Empress Wu died nine months later, perhaps consoled by the fact that her nephew Wu Sansi (武三思), son of her half-brother and as ambitious and intriguing as she, had managed to become the real master behind the scenes, controlling the restored emperor through his empress consort with whom he was having an affair.
Considering the events of her life literary allusions to Empress Wu can carry several connotations: a woman who has inappropriately overstepped her bounds, the hypocrisy of preaching compassion while simultaneously engaging in a pattern of corrupt and vicious behavior, and ruling by pulling strings in the background.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Wu_Ze_Tian   (1659 words)

  
 hanzi   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Chinese characters are employed to one degree or another in the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages.
The more common types Chinese characters, on the other hand, are radical-radical compounds, in which each element (radical) of the character hints at the meaning, and radical-phonetic compounds, in which one component (the radical) indicates the kind of concept the character describes, and the other hints at the pronunciation.
The earliest Chinese characters are the so called "Oracle Script" or (甲骨文) jia3gu3wen2 during the Shang Dynasty, followed by the Bronzeware Script or (金文) jin1wen2 during the Zhou Dynasty.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Hanzi.html   (1196 words)

  
 Chinese
Chinese character Chinese characters are used to varying degrees in the written forms of the Hangul.
Chinese Cuban Chinese Cuban is a Chinese born in Cuba.
Chinese flute Chinese Di Zi (and its varieties such as the Qudi and Bangdi), the Bawa, the Guanzi, and the Xiao.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/chinese.html   (2924 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Traditional Chinese character
Traditional Chinese characters are used in Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and some overseas Chinese communities; especially those originating from the aforementioned countries or who emigrated before the widepspread adoption of simplified characters in the People's Republic of China.
In contrast, simplified characters are used in Mainland China, Malaysia, Singapore and in some overseas Chinese communities; especially those from aforementioned countries who emigrated after the widespread adoption of simplified Chinese characters.
Curiously, although the character which is generally translated as "complex" is itself comprised of numerous, if not complex strokes, the character has not undergone simplification; this is perhaps intentional as it demonstrates the relative complexity of the Traditional characters in contrast to the Simplified versions.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Traditional-Chinese-character   (1502 words)

  
 Chinese characters of Empress Wu
Chinese characters of Empress Wu Empress Wu, only reigning female in the History of China, created several unique Chinese characters to demonstrate her power.
The characters were not created by the Empress herself, they were suggested by an official named Zōng Qínkè (宗秦客) in the year 689 A.D. The number of these characters is controversial, but various sources say 12 to 19 characters.
For instance Empress Wu's own name zhao4 照 was replaced with 瞾, but is erroneously thought to be 曌, and looking in the Kangxi Dictionary, one finds the description of the former having two 目 (eye) characters being the proper character rather than the word ming2 明 meaning bright.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/chinese_characters_of_empress_wu   (283 words)

  
 Empress Dowager Cixi Summary
She was privileged to become empress dowager only because she was the biological mother of Emperor Tongzhi.
Empress Dowager Ci'an died suddenly on April 8, 1881, during an audience at the court.
When the Westerners responded by dispatching the Eight-Nation Alliance, the Chinese military, badly underdeveloped due to Cixi's habit of filching military funds, was unable to prevent the high-tech Allied army from marching on Peking and seizing the Forbidden City.
www.bookrags.com /Empress_Dowager_Cixi   (4380 words)

  
 Read about Chinese character at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Chinese character and learn about Chinese character ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Most Chinese characters, however, are radical-radical compounds, in which each element (radical) of the character hints at the meaning, and radical-phonetic compounds, in which one component (the radical) indicates the kind of concept the character describes, and the other hints at the pronunciation.
For example, the Chinese characters for "cancer", "hemorrhoids", "corpse" and "excrement", as well as parts of compound words (words created from two or more Chinese characters) meaning "curse", "prostitute", and "rape", are among the proposed additions to the list.
Although nearly extinct, Vietnamese used varying scripts of Chinese characters to write the language, with use of Chinese characters becoming limited to ceremonial uses beginning in the 19th century.
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Chinese_character   (2880 words)

  
 NTU Info Centre: Chinese character   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Chinese characters or Han characters (汉字/漢字) are used in the written forms of the Chinese language, and to varying degrees in the Japanese and Korean languages (though the latter only in South Korea).
Image Unavailable The earliest Chinese characters are the so called "oracle script" or (甲骨文) jiǎgǔwén during the Shang Dynasty, followed by the bronzeware script or (金文) jīnwén during the Zhou Dynasty.
The large number of Chinese characters is due to its logographic nature — for every morpheme there must be a symbol, and sometimes there are variant characters have developed for the same morpheme.
www.nowtryus.com /article:Chinese_character   (3056 words)

  
 NTU Info Centre: Empress Wu   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
She first had the concubine née Xiao out of the way, and then her next target was the empress consort herself, which she succeeded in discrediting by framing her for the killing of her (Wu Zetian) baby in the end of 654 (it is said that Wu Zetian herself had done the deed).
Traditional Chinese political theory did not allow a woman to ascend the throne and Empress Wu was determined to quash the opposition and promote loyal officials within the bureaucracy (see also the similar Salic law).
She died nine months later, perhaps consoled by the fact that her nephew Wu Sansi (武三思), son of her half-brother, and as ambitious and intriguing as her, had managed to become the real master behind the scenes, controlling the restored emperor through his empress consort with whom he was having an affair.
www.nowtryus.com /article:Empress_Wu   (1499 words)

  
 Chinese character - Chinese Character - Chinese
Chinese characters or Han characters (汉字/漢字) are used in the written forms of the Chinese language, and to varying degrees in the Japanese languageJapanese and Korean languageKorean languages (though the latter only in South Korea).
Most Chinese characters, however, are radical-radical compounds, in which each element (radical) of the character hints at the meaning, and radical-phonetic compounds, in which one component (the radical) indicates the kind of concept the character describes, and the other hints at the pronunciation.
The large number of Chinese characters is due to their logographic nature andmdash; for every morpheme there must be a symbol, and sometimes there are variant characters have developed for the same morpheme.
www.famouschinese.com /virtual/Chinese_character   (3193 words)

  
 CHINESE CHARACTERS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Chinese characters are employed to one degree or another in the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese languages.
Chinese characters appear to have originated in the Shang dynasty as pictograms depicting concrete objects.
Chinese characters that are closer to the spoken language were used to write informal works such as colloquial novels.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /definition/CHINESE+CHARACTERS   (3407 words)

  
 Fathom :: The Source for Online Learning
During the many stages of their evolution, Chinese characters and calligraphy have been treated as a high art, and well into the modern era they have also been considered to have mystical powers.
During the Qin and Han, the characters used in any emperor's personal name became taboo after his death and had to be replaced by variant forms, sometimes with just one stroke missing, sometimes a whole section of the character removed.
The Empress Wu (625-705 CE), who ruled China from 684 to 705 after the death of her husband, the Gaozong emperor, promulgated 12 or 14 "new" (and strange) characters, identical in meaning and pronunciation to the original ones in her name but visually different enough to "protect" those original characters.
www.fathom.com /feature/121782   (1779 words)

  
 Empress Wu Zetian of China
Wu Zetian (武則天 pinyin: Wu3 Ze2tian1) (625-705), reigning name Empress Wu (武后 Wu3-hou4), self-named Wu Zhao (武曌 Wu3 Zhao4), from Wenshui (文水, now in Shanxi), is the only reigning female in the history of China.
After Gaozong suffered a stroke, she began to govern China from behind the scenes through him and subsequent puppet emperors, only assuming power herself in 690, when she declared the Zhou Dynasty (not to be confused with the first Zhou Dynasty, lasting from 1122 BC to 256 BC).
Traditional Chinese political theory did not allow a woman to ascend the throne and Empress Wu was determined to squash the opposition and promote loyal officials within the bureaucracy.
usapedia.com /e/empress-wu-zetian-of-china.html   (349 words)

  
 The Chinese Script (www.chinaknowledge.de)
The character of Chinese as a language with isolated syllables not having a declination or conjugation makes it possible to express every spoken word in a written form simply by writing one single character.
Hand writing is often done with character shapes that vary from the normal book printing, partially by change of stroke order or connection of two strokes to one to make writing quicker and easier, partially to acheive a character appearance that is more beautiful (see calligraphy page).
Chinese is written in columns from right to left, according to the natural material of bamboo strips - but already on the oracle bone inscriptions and bronze inscriptions, Chinese is written in columns.
www.chinaknowledge.de /Literature/script.html   (6755 words)

  
 Studio of Three Words: Devising a Chinese Name
A Chinese personal name may be one or two characters (very occasionally three) and the words used can come from almost any part of the language.
If you are not Chinese then the easiest thing to do is to adopt a surname which sounds similar to your own, but it is probably best to avoid choosing a surname which is too common or you will find yourself with a large number of new "relatives".
Chinese has only a limited syllabary, so it is especially easy to mistakenly produce a Chinese name which sounds like a known phrase, with possibly embarassing consequences.
members.tripod.com /~gavvie/sealcarving/names/devisingnames.html   (1375 words)

  
 wu.html
Wu, one of the most famous (or notorious) women in Chinese history, usurped the ruling power after the death of her husband (the 4th emperor of the Tang Dynasty).
When she took power, she named herself Wu Chou and one of the 19 new Chinese characters invented by her was one to represent her name.
Young asks "Why would a SLO Chinese family own bowls with this particular story when there are many important historical sagas which could be depicted?" He indicates that legendary beautiful women, historical brave and loyal warriers, the goddess of Mercy, the eight Taoist fairies and other folk heros are commonly seen in Chinese porcelain paintings.
www.tcsn.net /sloarchaeology/wu.html   (1124 words)

  
 Chinese Character Topic Center - Chinese
Chinese character encoding Chinese character encoding is needed for the display of Chinese characters in computers, used in the Chinese languageChine...
Chinese input methods for computers needs to be higher Because the Chinese language uses a logogramlogographic scriptandmdash;one in which one &qu...
Chinese characters of Empress Wu Empress Wu Zetian of ChinaEmpress Wu, the only reigning female in the History of China, created several unique Chinese characters to demons...
www.famouschinese.com /public/Chinese_Character.html   (617 words)

  
 Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Qing Era- (1644- 1912)
Empress Xiaoquan Cheng, (1808 - 1840) of the Niuhuru clan
Empress Xiaoxian Chun (1712- 1748), of the Fucha clan.
Lady Lingiya was a Han Chinese maid at the mansion of the 1st prince Chun, whose original Chinese family name was Liu (劉) and was changed into the Manchu clan's name Lingyia when she was made a Manchu, which was required in order to become the concubine of a Manchu prince.
www.ibiblio.org /chinesehistory/contents/06dat/bio.2qin.html   (12643 words)

  
 [KFCC]The Banquet Review
Empress Wan sends a messenger to Wu Luan, informing him of his father's murder and urging his return, unaware that the new Emperor Li has also dispatched assassins to snuff out the threat posed by the Prince's return.
People also seem to have been critical of Zhang Ziyi, questioning her casting (as a result of which the character of empress wan was made younger) and her ability to do justice to the role.
Daniel Wu puts in yet another solid performance as the emotional young Prince; like Empress Wan, his Wu Luan is torn between his feelings (for Wan), the pain of his father's murder and his relationship with the daughter of General Yin, Qing (Zhou Xun).
www.kfccinema.com /reviews/swordplay/banquet/banquet.html   (1003 words)

  
 The Cultural Heritage of China :: Entertainment :: Chinese Opera :: Beijing Opera
Characters, whether they are from ancient times or in pre-modern China, appear on the Chinese opera stage wearing costumes suitable to their roles.
Ten colors are used, half of which are the five primary colors (or shang wu se), namely, red, green, yellow, white and fl, in contrast to the other group of pink, blue, purple, pale-brown and pale-blue, all of which are labeled secondary colors (xia wu se).
As in the Chinese language itself, the designs are visually based and are seen from the top to the bottom, gradually bringing the spectator into the role of the character.
www.ibiblio.org /chineseculture/contents/entr/p-entr-c01s02.html   (2901 words)

  
 Chinese character - InfoSearchPoint.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
They were also used in Vietnamese until the beginning of the 20th century when the Roman alphabet was adopted as it better suit its needs.
In Chinese they are called Hanzi, in Japanese they are called Kanji, in Korean they are called Hanja (or Hanmun) and in Vietnamese there were two writing systems based on Chinese characters: chữ nôm and chữ nho.
For example, the Taiwanese politician Wang Jian-hsüan has a name that is difficult to encode in some computer systems because the last character in the name is a uncommon character.
www.infosearchpoint.com /display/Chinese_character   (1056 words)

  
 Wu Zetian | Encyclopedia of Modern Asia
Wu Zetian was the only woman to rule in China as an emperor in name.
She entered the Chinese imperial court at the age of thirteen as a lowly ranked concubine to Emperor Taizong (reigned 626–649) of the Tang dynasty (618–907 CE), but when he died she became concubine and later empress to her stepson, Emperor Gaozong (reigned 650–683).
Overall, Wu Zetian was a decisive, capable ruler in the roles of empress, empress dowager, and emperor.
www.bookrags.com /research/wu-zetian-ema-06   (476 words)

  
 Chinese History - Liao Dynasty (Khitan) 遼 literature, thought, philosophy, and the Khitan script ...
This first script is called the Large Khitan Script and borrows many Chinese characters without changing their original appearance, while also other characters are derived from a Chinese character and are changed slightly, and a third group of characters has no Chinese origin or counterpart but was invented independently.
But because the Khitan language is not related to the monosyllabic Chinese (one word - one syllable - one character) but belongs to the Altaic languages that are highly agglutinating (one word - many syllables) the Chinese logographic script does not provide an ideal writing system for Khitan.
Khitan princes, princesses, empresses and consorts were able to write Chinese poems, and some possessed large libraries like Yelü Bei 耶律倍 in his Wanghaitang Hall 望海堂 on top of Mt. Yiwulü 醫巫闭山.
www.chinaknowledge.de /History/Song/liao-literature.html   (1041 words)

  
 The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Special Exhibitions   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Because each character has a recognized standard form and is composed following a fixed sequence of brushstrokes, it is possible to follow the hand of the artist as he reenacts this pattern.
According to Chinese tradition, the key figure in the transformation of writing into art was Wang Xizhi (303–361).
As characters part and scatter, the distinction between image and ground, between the spaces within characters and the spaces surrounding them, are blurred.
www.metmuseum.org /special/EmbodiedImageCalligraphy/chinese_more.htm   (2185 words)

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