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Topic: Chrismation


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  OCA - The Orthodox Faith
It is used in chrismation to show that the gift of the Spirit was originally given to men through the apostles of Christ, whose formal successors in the world are the bishops of the Church (see Acts 8:14; 19:1-7).
Together with being baptized and chrismated, the new-born child is also "churched." The rite of churching imitates the offering of male children to the temple according to the law of the Old Testament, particularly the offering of Christ on the fortieth day after his birth (Luke 2:22).
It is also the Orthodox tradition that the mysteries of baptism and chrismation, called officially "holy illumination," are fulfilled in the immediate reception by the "newly-enlightened" of Holy Communion in the eucharistic liturgy of the Church.
www.oca.org /OCchapter.asp?SID=2&ID=52   (931 words)

  
 Chrismation Information
Chrismation is the name given in Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern-rite Catholic churches, as well as in the Assyrian Church of the East, and in Anglican and Lutheran initiation rites, to the sacrament or holy mystery more commonly known in the West as confirmation, although Italian normally uses cresima (chrismation), rather than confermazione (confirmation).
The term chrismation is used because of the perfumed holy oil, myrrh (μύρον), or chrism, consecrated by a bishop, with which the recipient of the sacrament is anointed, while the priest speaks the words sealing the initiate with the gift of the Holy Spirit.
In the Eastern Churches, i.e., the Assyrian Church of the East and the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and Eastern Rite Catholic churches, as well as in Anglican and Lutheran churches, this sacramental rite may be performed by a presbyter (priest), and is usually conferred immediately after baptism; therefore, it is usually received by infants.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Chrismation   (754 words)

  
  Chrismation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Chrismation is the name given in Orthodox and Eastern-rite Catholic churches to the sacrament known as confirmation in the Latin Rite Catholic churches.
It is so called because of the holy oil, or chrism, which has been consecrated by a bishop and with which the recipient of the sacrament is anointed, as the priest speaks the words, "the seal of the gift of the Holy Spirit." All Roman Catholics are encouraged to receive the sacrament of confirmation.
In addition, Chrismation is used to admit converts who were originally baptized according to a Trinitarian formula.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Chrismation.html   (333 words)

  
 - Holy Chrismation
The Sacrament of Chrismation awakens in the soul that inner, spiritual thirst which does not let one grow satisfied solely with the earthly and material, but always summons us to the Heavenly, to the eternal and the perfect.
It is for this reason that in Chrismation the new member of the Church not only receives the Spirit within, but is outwardly encompassed by Him, being robed henceforth as if in special spiritual garments.
In the Office of the Sacrament of Chrismation, the anointing is performed with the recitation of the words, The Seal of the Gift of the Holy Spirit, during which the Priest anoints crosswise with the Holy Chrism the forehead, eyes, nostrils, mouth, ears, breast, hands and feet of the Newly-illumined.
www.stots.edu /article.php?id=37   (782 words)

  
 Chrismation
Chrismation is the name given in Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern-rite Catholic churches, as well as in the Assyrian Church of the East, and in Anglican and Lutheran initiation rites, to the sacrament or holy mystery more commonly known in the West as confirmation, although Italian normally uses cresima (chrismation), rather than confermazione (confirmation).
The term chrismation is used because of the perfumed holy oil, myrrh (μύρον), or chrism, consecrated by a bishop, with which the recipient of the sacrament is anointed, while the priest speaks the words sealing the initiate with the gift of the Holy Spirit.
In Anglican and Lutheran churches, chrismation is usually conferred immediately after baptism, while "Confirmation" has come to describe a rite of a mature acknowledgement of the faith, graced by the laying-on of the bishop's hands.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http%3A%2F%2Farticles.gourt.com%2F%3Farticle%3DChrismation%26type%3Den   (780 words)

  
 Chrismation
It is difficult to speak about the Sacrament of Chrismation in an isolated fashion without maintaining a constant regard for and reference to the water rite of Baptism.
The grace of Chrismation strengthens and confirms, one's life in the Holy Church, which moves toward an everlasting life into The Kingdom and it eternally remains the energy of that movement or spiritual progress towards the Kingdom of God forever belonging to Christ.
Both the water rite of Baptism and the anointing rite of Chrismation in the theology and tradition of Orthodox Christianity are essential to one's salvation.
www.evangelicalorthodoxcatholic.org /teach_13.html   (3082 words)

  
 Chrismation - OrthodoxWiki
Chrismation (sometimes called confirmation) is the sacrament by which a baptized person is granted the gift of the Holy Spirit through anointing with oil.
Unlike in the Western churches (e.g., Roman Catholic and Anglican), where confirmation is typically reserved to those of "the age of reason," Chrismation in the Orthodox Church is normally administered to infants immediately after baptism and immediately (or at least shortly) before one's first reception of Holy Communion.
Through Chrismation every member of the Church becomes a prophet, and receives a share in the royal priesthood of Christ; all Christians alike, because they are chrismated, are called to act as conscious witnesses to the Truth.
orthodoxwiki.org /Chrismation   (638 words)

  
 Holy Baptism & Holy Chrismation in John 3:5 - The Byzantine Forum
It is usually held that Confirmation corresponds to Chrismation although technically this is not 100% accurate.
The reference is to both Baptism and Chrismation because the early Church in both the East and West never separated these two portions of the process of initiation for new Christians.
I had a member of my own family describe to me that she was not able to receive for the first time until she was twelve years old--the custom by the late nineteenth century in many places.
www.byzcath.org /forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=132114&page=15   (1204 words)

  
 Chrismation - OrthodoxWiki
Chrismation (sometimes called confirmation) is the sacrament by which a baptized person is granted the gift of the Holy Spirit through anointing with oil.
Unlike in the Western churches (e.g., Roman Catholic and Anglican), where confirmation is typically reserved to those of "the age of reason," Chrismation in the Orthodox Church is normally administered to infants immediately after baptism and immediately (or at least shortly) before one's first reception of Holy Communion.
Through Chrismation every member of the Church becomes a prophet, and receives a share in the royal priesthood of Christ; all Christians alike, because they are chrismated, are called to act as conscious witnesses to the Truth.
www.orthodoxwiki.org /Chrismation   (0 words)

  
 LM
The term "chrismation" is from the Greek for an anointing.
Chrismation recalls the ancient anointing of kings and priests, and signifies the seal of baptism and incorporation into Christ, "The Anointed One." Use of chrism (which must be consecrated by the bishop) signifies the relationship of the episcopacy to baptism.
In the eastern church, chrismation is always administered immediately after baptism, regardless of the age of those baptized.
www.episcopalchurch.org /19625_13984_ENG_Print.html   (237 words)

  
 Christian Initiation: Baptism and Confirmation of Infants
Chrismation or Confirmation is the sacramental or mystical invocation of sealing by the Holy Spirit whom the neophyte receives after his Baptism.
Chrismation is the Pentecost of the new Christian as well as the anointing of the neophyte into the royal priesthood of the faithful (I Peter 2:9).
As a Baptized and Chrismated member of the Armenian Church, the child is now entitled to the joy of participation in the Holy Sacraments of which the greatest is the Holy Eucharist, to complete the initial steps of his journey toward the true life of salvation.
www.holytrinity-pa.org /cgi-bin/news/viewnews.cgi?id=EEpZulykulIhzxpSxp   (1373 words)

  
 OCA - The Orthodox Faith
Chrismation, the gift of the Holy Spirit, is performed in the Orthodox Church by anointing all parts of the person's body with the special oil called holy chrism.
Together with being baptized and chrismated, the new-born child is also "churched." The rite of churching imitates the offering of male children to the temple according to the law of the Old Testament, particularly the offering of Christ on the fortieth day after his birth (Luke 2:22).
It is also the Orthodox tradition that the mysteries of baptism and chrismation, called officially "holy illumination," are fulfilled in the immediate reception by the "newly-enlightened" of Holy Communion in the eucharistic liturgy of the Church.
oca.org /OCchapter.asp?SID=2&ID=52   (931 words)

  
 Orthodox Church - MSN Encarta
These sacraments are baptism, chrismation (confirmation), the Eucharist, holy orders, matrimony (see marriage), penance (confession), and anointing of the sick.
The central Orthodox sacrament is the Eucharist, the ceremony in which the Last Supper of Jesus, known in Orthodoxy as the Mystical Supper, is reenacted.
This chrismation (known in Western churches as confirmation) is normally given to infants rather than to adolescents.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761572657_2/Orthodox_Church.html   (2088 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The bishop is the ordinary minister of Confirmation or Chrismation, and he normally delegates his authority to Corfirm or Chrismate to the priests who Baptize infants or receive converts.
The bishop or priest gives the person he confirms or chrismates a slight blow on the cheek, to put him in mind that he must be ready to suffer everything, even death, for the sake of Christ.
Chrismation (Confirmation) is not so necessary for salvation that we could not be saved without it; nevertheless, there is a divine command obliging all to receive it, if possible.
www.reu.org /public/catecism/c15.htm   (1246 words)

  
 parresia: Chrismation
The mystery or sacrament of chrismation is anchored in the events of Jesus' baptism (Matthew 3:13-17) and the outpourning of the Spirit on the disciples at Pentecost (Acts 2:1-4).
Chrismation is not so much a second sacrament as it is the fulfillment of baptism.
Chrismation is called "the seal" and as each catechumen is anointed with chrism the priest proclaims, "the seal of the gift of the Holy Spirit!" to which the congregation responds "Amen!" The neophyte receives the Holy Spirit as the source, pledge and seal of unending life.
www.chattablogs.com /jeremy/archives/003344.html   (512 words)

  
 Pictures: Chrismations: Sept 2006 | Saint Athanasius Orthodox Church
Chrismation, the gift of the Holy Spirit, is performed in the Orthodox Church by anointing the person's body with a special oil called holy chrism.
Following baptism and chrismation, the person newly-received into God's family is tonsured -- the person's hair is cut in the sign of the cross.
The mysteries of baptism and chrismation, are fulfilled in the immediate reception by the "newly-enlightened" of Holy Communion in the eucharistic liturgy of the Church.
athanasiusoca.org /pictures/chrismations/2006sept   (152 words)

  
 Eastern_Theology
Chrismation also consecrates the newly baptized as a preparatory ritual for their sharing in the eucharist.
However, even before this splintering of chrismation rituals in the West, the practice in the East was not uniform at first.
Lest the history of chrismation in the Eastern church be perceived as a consistent whole, it may be good to review the particulars.
www.paulturner.org /eastern_theology.htm   (1880 words)

  
 The Holy Scraments   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Baptism, Chrismation, and Holy Communion are all given at the time of baptism.
Chrismation - In the process of growing up, the child needs strength of body and mind.
Chrismation, or the anointing with oil at baptism, seals him or her with the Holy Spirit, promising spiritual strength as a member of the Church.
www.stsarkis.org /history/StSarkisHistory_holy_sacraments.htm   (460 words)

  
 Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center Holy Mystery of Chrismation
Ideally, Baptism and Chrismation are done during a Divine Liturgy and the Holy Eucharist is received at that Liturgy.
During the Holy Mystery of Chrismation, the candidate is anointed with Holy Myron (a special mixture of oil and spices) consecrated each year on Great and Holy Thursday by the Patriarch for all the Melkite Greek Catholic Churches.
The Holy Mystery of Chrismation is administered by a priest.
www.mliles.com /melkite/chrismation.shtml   (1189 words)

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