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Topic: Christian II of Sweden


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In the News (Tue 18 Jun 19)

  
  Christian II - LoveToKnow 1911
Christian's succession to the throne was confirmed at the Herredag, or assembly of notables from the three northern kingdoms, which met at Copenhagen in 1513.
Christian revenged himself by executing the magnate Torben Oxe, who, on very creditable evidence, was supposed to have been Dyveke's murderer, despite the strenuous opposition of Oxe's fellow-peers; and henceforth the king lost no opportunity of depressing the nobility and raising plebeians to power.
Christian, who had already taken measures to isolate Sweden politically, hastened to the relief of the archbishop, who was beleagured in his fortress of Stake, but was defeated by Sture and his peasant levies at Vedla and forced to return to Denmark.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Christian_II   (1447 words)

  
 CHRISTIAN II OF DENMARK FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Christian II (July 2, 1481 – January 25, 1559) was a Danish monarch and King of Denmark, Norway (1513 – 1523) and Sweden (1520 – 1521), under the Kalmar Union.
Christian was born the son of King John of Denmark ''("Kong Hans")'' and Christina of Saxony, at Nyborg Castle in 1481 and succeeded his father as king and regent in Denmark and Norway, where he later was to be succeeded by his uncle king Frederick I of Denmark.
Christian, who had already taken measures to isolate Sweden politically, hastened to the relief of the archbishop, who was beleaguered in his fortress of Stäket, but was defeated by Sture and his peasant levies at Vedila and forced to return to Denmark.
www.askacouple.com /Christian_II_of_Denmark   (2326 words)

  
 Sweden. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Sweden falls into two main geographical regions: the north (Norrland), comprising about two thirds of the country, which is mountainous (except for a narrow strip of lowland along the Gulf of Bothnia); and the south (Svealand and Götaland), which is mostly low-lying and where most of the population lives.
The history of 19th-century Sweden, under Charles XIV (reigned 1818–44), Oscar I (1844–59), Charles XV (1859–72), and Oscar II (1872–1907), was one of progressive liberalization in government and of industrial development.
Sweden entered the United Nations in 1946, and Dag Hammarskjöld, a Swedish diplomat, was secretary-general of the organization from 1953 until his death in 1961.
www.bartleby.com /65/sw/Sweden.html   (2264 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Sweden : Economy, Scandinavia (Scandinavian Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
Sweden is one of the world's leading producers of iron ore; important mines are at Kiruna and GAllivare.
Sweden is known for its decorative and folk arts, fine glassware (made especially at Orrefors), and high-quality steel cutlery and blades.
Sweden was a member of the European Free Trade Association from 1960 to 1994; in 1995 it joined the European Union.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/S/Sweden-economy.html   (419 words)

  
 Christian II of Denmark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Christian II (July 2, 1481 – January 25, 1559) was a Danish monarch and King of Denmark, Norway (1513 1523) and Sweden (1520 1521), under the Kalmar Union.
On August 12, 1515, Christian married Isabella of Burgundy, the granddaughter of the emperor Maximilian I.
Christian II's blood returned to the Swedish and Norwegian thrones in person of Charles XV of Sweden, descendant of Renata of Lorraine; and to Danish throne in person of Christian X of Denmark.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Christian_II_of_Denmark   (2495 words)

  
 History of Sweden
Sweden suffered further territorial losses during the Napoleonic wars and was forced to cede Finland to Russia in 1809.
Sweden's predominantly agricultural economy shifted gradually from village to private farm-based agriculture during the Industrial Revolution, but this change failed to bring economic and social improvements proportionate with the rate of population growth.
While some argued that it went against Sweden's historic policy of neutrality (Sweden had not joined the EU during the Cold War because it was incompatible with neutrality), others viewed the move as a natural extension of the economic cooperation that had been going on since 1972 with the EU.
www.historyofnations.net /europe/sweden.html   (933 words)

  
 Comparative Criminology | Europe - Sweden
Sweden suffered further territorial losses during the Napoleonic wars and was forced to cede Finland to Russia in 1809.
Sweden's predominantly agricultural economy shifted gradually from village to private farm-based agriculture during the Industrial Revolution, but this change failed to bring economic and social improvements commensurate with the rate of population growth.
Sweden also is a party to the 1961 UN Single Convention, as amended by the 1972 Protocol, and to the 1971 UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances.
www-rohan.sdsu.edu /faculty/rwinslow/europe/sweden.html   (10479 words)

  
 Sweden History | iExplore.com
Sweden’s contact with the rest of Europe is first recorded in the Viking period, when the country traded furs and arms with Russia, along the eastern passage.
Sweden won the last remaining Baltic territories not under their control – Prussia and Pomerania – but Gustav was killed at the battle of Lützen in 1632.
Sweden chose not to join the European single currency at its inception in 1999, public support was lacking and the government felt that economic conditions were not right.
www.iexplore.com /dmap/Sweden/History   (1418 words)

  
 freedominfo.org: features - legislative transparency - sweden
Sweden was also the first country in the world to establish an Office of the Parliamentary Ombudsmen, a body to which citizens can turn with complaints about the authorities.
Constitutional reform in Sweden consists of a very rigid mechanism: two consecutive Riksdags must approve the amendment twice (the amendment is approved by a Riksdag, an election is held, and the new Riksdag must approve the amendment again).
Sweden's public sector: In Sweden there are three democratically elected levels of government, all with their own powers and responsibilities: the Riksdag (Swedish Parliament) at national level, county administration boards at regional level and municipalities at local level.
www.freedominfo.org /features/leg-sweden.htm   (6148 words)

  
 The History Of Sweden
Christian II defeated Sture, entered Stockholm in triumph, and was acknowledged king.
Sweden's remarkable success in the Thirty Years' War may be partially attributed to reforms instituted by Gustavus and the nobility, including the creation of an efficient central bureaucracy and the reorganization of local government under county governors.
Sweden remained neutral during World War I and was not seriously affected by the war until the Germans began unrestricted submarine warfare in 1917.
members.tripod.com /~worldsite/sweden/history.html   (4326 words)

  
 Gustav I of Sweden Summary
Gustav was born in Rydboholm castle, Rydboholm, Österåker, Stockholm, Sweden.
When the Danes, under Christian II, conquered Sweden and took the capital Stockholm in 1520 several members of the Sture party were executed in the Stockholm Bloodbath in October that year, among whom was Erik Johansson.
A grandmother of Anna Maria of Ostfriesland (and thereby an ancestor of Queen Victoria) and great-grandmother of Adolf Frederick II, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.
www.bookrags.com /Gustav_I_of_Sweden   (2691 words)

  
 Sweden Info
Sweden, which occupies the eastern part of the Scandinavian peninsula, is the fourth-largest country in Europe, and is one-tenth larger than California.
Sweden emerged from the Napoleonic Wars with the acquisition of Norway from Denmark and with a new royal dynasty stemming from Marshal Jean Bernadotte of France, who became King Charles XIV (181844).
The artificial union between Sweden and Norway led to an uneasy relationship, and the union was finally dissolved in 1905.
wjwarnick.tripod.com /warnickfamilyhistory/id9.html   (1204 words)

  
 Denmark : History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Christian II recaptured Sweden in 1520 but was defeated by the Swedish warrior-king Gustavus Vasa a year later.
Despite that, the reign of the Danish king Christian IV (1577-1648) was one of relative prosperity.
Sweden was understandably concerned about Denmark's control of the entrance to the Baltic, the sea on which Sweden and many members of the Hanseatic League depended.
www.frommers.com /destinations/print-narrative.cfm?destID=220&catID=0220020044   (3222 words)

  
 Sweden
Sweden has no requirement that, in order for a country to be considered a "safe third country," it must actually have an asylum procedure and that the applicant will be admitted to that procedure.
Sweden, unlike most other European countries, does not impose fines on carriers who bring foreigners without visas to Sweden; but it does require that carriers responsible for bringing undocumented foreigners to Sweden pay for their return trip if they are denied permission to remain.
Sweden must not use the European Union joint position as an excuse for continuing to apply a narrow interpretationof the Refugee Convention, particularly in light of the proposal to eliminate its generous approach to "de facto refugees" and those obtaining residence permits on humanitarian grounds.
www.hrw.org /reports/1996/Sweden.htm   (17023 words)

  
 CHRISTIAN II - Online Information article about CHRISTIAN II
Christian first appointed her controller of the See also:
Stockholm, and the peasantry of central Sweden, stimulated by her patriotism, flew to arms, defeated the Danish invaders at Balundsas (March19th), and were only with the utmost difficulty finally defeated at the bloody battle of Upsala (See also:
Sweden too was now in open revolt; and both Norway and Denmark were taxed to the uttermost to raise an army for the subjection of the See also:
encyclopedia.jrank.org /CHR_CLI/CHRISTIAN_II.html   (2230 words)

  
 Sweden - A Look at the Past
Skötkonung was baptized a Christian, and the tribes gradually converted to Christianity.
In 1397, Sweden was united with Denmark and Norway in the Kalmar Union under the rule of Queen Margareta of Denmark.
Sweden's power waned in the early 18th century when it was defeated in battle by the Russians at Poltava.
www.cp-pc.ca /english/sweden/alook.html   (441 words)

  
 Europa: The History of the White Race: Chapter 24   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Sweden's expansion reached a height under Gustav II Adolph, who is still considered by many Swedes to be their greatest king.
A war with Russia which ended in 1617, saw Gustav II obtain for Sweden the lands of eastern Karelia and Ingria; a war with Poland from 1621 to 1629, saw Sweden annex all of Livonia and in 1630, Gustav entered the Christian Thirty Year's War on the side of the Protestants in Germany.
Sweden retained a strict policy of neutrality right through the major conflicts of the twentieth century, refusing to be drawn into the First or Second World Wars and the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States of America.
www.fortunecity.com /victorian/fowles/500/hwr24.htm   (4358 words)

  
 Christian II - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
CHRISTIAN II [Christian II] 1481-1559, king of Denmark and Norway (1513-23) and Sweden (1520-23), son and successor of King John.
Reinhold Niebuhr and the Christian century: World War II and the eclipse of the social gospel.
Christian Associates Statement Upon the Death of Pope John Paul II.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-christ2.html   (435 words)

  
 Vasaloppet
In 1520 the young nobleman Gustav Ericsson Vasa was escaping from the troops of Christian II, king of Sweden and the countries of the Kalmar Union.
In a move to silence the opposition Christian invited the Swedish aristocracy to a reconciliation party in Stockholm, only to have them, including Gustav's parents, massacred in what came to be known as the Stockholm Bloodbath.
On June 6, 1523 Gustav Vasa was crowned king of Sweden, having beaten the Danish king Christian and dissolved the Kalmar Union.
www.ufaqs.com /wiki/en/va/Vasaloppet.htm   (428 words)

  
 Sweden (07/06)
The 2002 election results for Sweden’s major parties were as follows: the Social Democratic Party (39.8%; 144 seats), the Moderate Party (15.2%; 55 seats), the Liberal Party (13.3%; 48 seats), the Christian Democrats (9.1%; 33 seats), the Left Party (8.3%; 30 seats), the Center Party (6.1%; 22 seats), and the Green Party (4.6%; 17 seats).
Sweden became a member in part due to its increasing isolation outside the economic framework of the Maastricht Treaty.
Sweden has devoted particular attention to issues of disarmament, arms control, and nuclear nonproliferation and has contributed importantly to UN and other international peacekeeping efforts, including the NATO-led peacekeeping forces in the Balkans.
state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/2880.htm   (3663 words)

  
 Swedish royalty
Sweden was in fact a small country and did not have the capacity to compete with a huge state like Russia.
Sweden declared its neutrality upon the outbreak of World War I and entered an allance with Denmark and Norway to defend their neutrality and common economic interests.
Gustav VI was born in 1882 at Stockholm, Sweden.
histclo.com /royal/swe/royal-swe.htm   (1851 words)

  
 Christian II — FactMonster.com
Christian II Christian II, 1481–1559, king of Denmark and Norway (1513–23) and Sweden (1520–23), son and successor of King John.
In Denmark, Christian earned the hatred of the nobles and high clergy by thorough reforms in favor of the lower and middle classes, by inviting Lutheran preachers to Copenhagen, and by placing Sigbrit, mother of his Dutch mistress, in charge of the finances of the realm.
Christian fled, but in 1532 he was captured while attempting to recover the throne.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/people/A0812084.html   (164 words)

  
 myArmoury.com: The Rapier of Gustav Vasa, King of Sweden
He was raised at the court of the Regent of Sweden, Sten Sture the Younger, and participated in the fighting against the Danes.
Sweden was part of a union consisting of the Nordic countries (Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Swedish Finland), but the union was racked by internal strife and competing interests.
Later, on the initiative of King Gustavus II Adolphus in the early 17th century, the collection became the The Royal Armoury Stockholm in 1654, and thus the oldest museum in the world.
www.myarmoury.com /feature_vasa.html   (1885 words)

  
 Christian II - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Christian II (1481-1559), king of Denmark and Norway (1513-1523) and of Sweden (1520-1523), the son and successor of King John (Hans; 1455-1513).
For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.
Christianity : missionaries and spread of Christianity : Oceania: Pomare II
encarta.msn.com /Christian_II.html   (134 words)

  
 Columbia Encyclopedia- Christian II - AOL Research & Learn   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In Denmark, Christian earned the hatred of the nobles and high clergy by thorough reforms in favor of the lower and middle classes, by inviting Lutheran preachers to Copenhagen, and by placing Sigbrit, mother of his Dutch mistress, in charge of the finances of the realm.
In 1523 the nobles rebelled (particularly in Jutland), deposed Christian, and chose his uncle, Frederick I, as king.
Christian fled, but in 1532 he was captured while attempting to recover the throne.
reference.aol.com /columbia/_a/christian-ii/20051205220409990047   (183 words)

  
 Sweden
Approximately 81 percent of the population belong to the Church of Sweden.
While weekly services in Christian houses of worship generally are poorly attended, a large number of persons observe major festivals of the ecclesiastical year and prefer a religious ceremony to mark the turning points of life.
Approximately 70 percent of children are baptized, 40 percent of all those eligible are confirmed, and 90 percent of funeral services are performed under the auspices of the Church of Sweden.
www.state.gov /g/drl/rls/irf/2003/24435.htm   (1581 words)

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