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Topic: Christian de Duve


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  Christian de Duve - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
de Duve was born in Thames-Ditton, Britain, as a son of Belgian emigrants.
De Duve was awarded the shared Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1974, together with Albert Claude and George E. Palade, for describing the structure and function of organelles in biological cells.
De Duve proposes that peroxisomes may have been the first endosymbionts, which allowed cells to withstand the growing amounts of free molecular oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Christian_de_Duve   (303 words)

  
 Christian de Duve - Wikipedia
Hij was er van overtuigd dat de oplossing lag in de biochemie, en besloot ook een graad in de scheikunde te halen.
Verder onderzoek leidde tot de identificatie van een nieuw celorganel dat in 1955 de naam lysosoom kreeg.
De laatste wijziging op deze pagina vond plaats op 31 aug 2005 18:24.
nl.wikipedia.org /wiki/Christian_de_Duve   (381 words)

  
 Nobel Laureate in 1974   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
De Duve's discovery of lysosomes arose out of his research on the enzymes involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates by the liver.
De Duve reasoned that the acid phosphatase was enclosed within the cell in some kind of membranous envelope that formed a self-contained organelle.
De Duve's discovery of lysosomes answered the question of how the powerful enzymes used by cells to digest nutrients are kept separate from other cell components.
www.freewebs.com /nobelprize/Ch_Duve.htm   (275 words)

  
 In the News: Christain deDuve Lectures on the Origins and Evolution of Life at UCSD
De Duve, who won the Nobel Prize for medicine in 1974 for discoveries concerning the structural and functional organization of the cell, titled his lecture, "Reflections on the origins and evolution of life." This was the 3rd talk sponsored by NSCORT--2 years ago Freeman Dyson spoke on the origins of life.
De Duve's lecture was very interesting, as he started off by saying that most of his life he's been a research biochemist, but only in the last few years has he become an "armchair" theorist with regards to the origins of life.
De Duve is convinced that all of the necessary origins of life prebiotics could have come from outer space.
www.arn.org /docs/news/deduveUCSD040501.htm   (1672 words)

  
 KNAW > The Heineken Prizes > Laureates
Christian de Duve was awarded the prize for his discovery of the cell organelles called the lysosome and peroxisome.
De Duve postulated that the enzyme was surrounded by a membrane which prevented it from affecting the other cell components.
De Duve has not only discovered the lysosome but also the peroxisome, another cell particle in which a number of enzymes can be localized, although the activity of these is not latent as it is in the lysosomal enzymes.
www.knaw.nl /cfdata/heineken/laureates_detail.cfm?winnaar__id=22   (567 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
He is also Founder-Administrator of the Christian de Duve Institute of Cellular Pathology (ICP), founded in Brussels in 1974.
Christian de Duve's work has been mainly in the area of cell biology.
More recently, de Duve has devoted his interests to the nature, origin, history, and future of life, and to their philosophical aspects.
www.templeton.org /biochem-finetuning/papers/deduve_bio.doc   (169 words)

  
 Christian de Duve - Wikipedia
Christian de Duve, nació en Thames-Ditton, Inglaterra en 1917.
Hijo de padres belgas, estudió Medicina en la Universidad de Lovaina, Bélgica.
También investigó las funciones físicas de los lisosomas y los peroxisomas, describiendo el proceso por el que la acción de los lisosomas permite la introducción de algunas sustancias en el interior del núcleo celular.
es.wikipedia.org /wiki/Christian_de_Duve   (217 words)

  
 Premio Nobel/Christian de Duve - Wikipedia
Artículos de diccionario deben ser colocados en Wikcionario.
Quizás ya exista un artículo Premio Nobel/Christian de Duve en ese proyecto.
Busca Premio Nobel/Christian de Duve en otros artículos.
es.wikipedia.org /wiki/Premio_Nobel/Christian_de_Duve   (169 words)

  
 Vital Dust - Life as a Cosmic Imperative: ARN Book Review
De Duve is himself a determinist about the origin of life and its subsequent evolution.
Thus, parts I to III are de Duve's argument for the relative ease of prebiotic and "protocell" evolution, parts IV to VI from the single cell to human intelligence, and part VII, evolution into the unknown (including, in a philosophical coda, the meaning of life).
In particular, de Duve's scenario for the origin of life, in which "protometabolism" produces the materials necessary for the RNA world of the first self-replicating molecules, is, he admits, "purely conjectural" (p.
www.arn.org /docs/reviews/rev005.htm   (706 words)

  
 Nobelist de Duve on origin of life @ UNC
Nobel Prize-winner Christian de Duve is giving a talk at UNC on the origin and evolution of life.
Christian de Duve shared the 1974 Nobel Prize for biology or medicine with Albert Claude and George Palade for their discoveries concerning the structural and functional organization of the cell.
de Duve is Professor Emeritus at the Medical Faculty of the University of Louvain, Belgium, founder and past president of the International Insititute of Cellular and Molecular pathology in Belgium, and Andrew W. Mellon Professor Emeritus at the Rockefeller University in New York.
www.ibiblio.org /london/agriculture/literature/1/msg00105.html   (351 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Books: Life Evolving: Molecules, Mind, and Meaning   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
De Duve then spends few chapters on paving the way from a pre biotic world to one that is dominated by protocells.
De Duve does not really discuss why he believes this is the case, other than it must be because this is what we have now.
De Duve's final appeal is that "something positive must be proposed that can eventually replace the myths propagated by religion." God does not exist, but we need "spiritual guides" to provide ethics and morals.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0195156056?v=glance   (3040 words)

  
 UCL - Christian de Duve Institute of Cellular Pathology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Conceived in the late 1960s, the International Institute of Cellular and Molecular Pathology, or ICP, opened its doors in 1974 on the new campus of the Medical Faculty of the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) in Woluwé-Saint-Lambert, in the outskirts of Brussels.
The aim of the new institute was to favour the use in biomedical research of the dramatic advances accomplished in the course of the last decades in the main fields of basic biology.
The remaining area existed only in brick-and-mortar form, and it was left to the founders to find the means to complete the space and finance the new teams who would occupy it.
www.icp.ucl.ac.be /ICP_en.html   (325 words)

  
 W.I.F. Council Members   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Rene is the President of the International Institute of Cellular and Molecular Pathology and the Christian de Duve Institute of Cellular Pathology(Patron HM Queen Fabiola), Professor Emeritus at the Rockefeller University, USA., and Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry at the Catholic University of Louvain.
Professor de Duve started his scientific and research career as Louvain Lecturer in the Medical Faculty at the Catholic University of Louvain in 1947 and stayed in this appointment till 1951 when he was made Professor of Biochemistry at the University.
Professor de Duve has numerous scientific publications to his name including ‘A Guided Tour of the Living Cell’ and ‘Blueprint for a Cell’ and is one of the great pioneers of modern Molecular Biology.
easyweb.easynet.co.uk /~ineed/wif/members/deduve.htm   (241 words)

  
 CMU BSD News and Events(text)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Christian de Duve received the "Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology" in 1974, and in that same year he founded the International Institute of Cellular and Molecular Pathology (ICP).
To celebrate this event, the members of the "Laboratoire de Chimie physiologique" of the "Universite catholique de Louvain" and the Biochemistry Unit of the ICP, of which Christian de Duve has been the director for many years, have decided to organise a reunion of as many as possible of his former and present colleagues.
Christian de Duve will be offered a present and a reception in the "Palais des Acad~mies".
info.bio.cmu.edu /Old/news/Released/af98e577.html   (289 words)

  
 Health & Medicine Abstracts at The Idea Channel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
de Duve, Emeritus Professor at the Catholic University of Louvain and at the Rockefeller University in New York, is a Belgian biochemist and cell biologist.
Born in 1917, de Duve discovered lysosomes (the digestive organelles of the cell) and peroxisomes (organelles that are the site of metabolic processes involving hydrogen peroxide).
Professor de Duve credits the Jesuits with providing him with the Cartesian foundation that served him so well once he "discovered" science almost by accident during the course of his medical studies.
www.ideachannel.com /Health&MedicineAbstracts.htm   (1073 words)

  
 Christian de Duve was a pioneering researcher in the field of subcellular biochemistry along side Albert Claude and ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Christian de Duve was a pioneering researcher in the field of subcellular biochemistry along side Albert Claude and George Palade.
De Duve then founded the International Institute of Cellular and Molecular Pathology (ICP), which he headed until 1991 and where he is currently pursuing his investigations into the origins of life.
Currently de Duve divides his time between ICP, the Catholic University of Louvain, and the Rockefeller Institute (now Rockefeller University) where he was appointed Professor in 1962, and where he is presently Professor of Biochemical Cytology Emeritus.
www.research.medsch.ucla.edu /pmts/Germline/Biography/cbcd.htm   (173 words)

  
 Powell's Books - Life Evolving: Molecules, Mind, and Meaning by Christian De Duve   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
With wide-ranging erudition, De Duve takes us on a dazzling tour of the biological world, beginning with the invisible workings of the cell, the area in which he won his Nobel Prize.
With equal authority, De Duve examines topics such as the evolution of humans, the origins of consciousness, the development of language, the birth of science, and the origin of emotion, morality, altruism, and love.
In this wise and humane volume, a master class in the nature of life is taught by one of the world's most eminent scientists, Novel laureate Christian de Duve.
www.powells.com /cgi-bin/biblio?isbn=0195156056   (408 words)

  
 Morehead Planetarium and Science Center :: Christian de Duve
Christian de Duve, who is interviewed in “Life in the Universe,” won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1974 for his work in the field of subcellular biology.
His 2002 book, “Life Evolving,” provides some of the groundwork for “Life in the Universe.” De Duve believes that the basic building blocks for life exist in many far-flung corners of the Universe.
The Nobel Laureate founded the International Institute of Cellular and Molecular Pathology (ICP), which he headed until 1991 and where he is currently pursuing his investigations into the origins of life.
www.moreheadplanetarium.org /index.cfm?fuseaction=page&filename=christian_de_duve_bio.html   (184 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Books: Vital Dust: Life As a Cosmic Imperative   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Professor emeritus at Manhattan's Rockefeller University, de Duve rejects the view that life arose through a series of accidents, nor does he invoke God, goal-directed causes or vitalism, which regards living beings as matter animated by vital spirit.
De Duve, a cell biologist and Nobel laureate, invokes a grand scope in this exposition of the origin and future of life.
De Duve joins that quest with a detailed examination of these mechanisms and the environments in which they come about.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0465090451?v=glance   (2627 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
de Duve C., Glucagon, the hyperglycemic-glycogenolytic factor of the pancreas.
de Duve C., Berthet J. and Beaufay H., Gradient centrifugation of cell particles.
de Duve C., The separation and characterization of subcellular particles.
zeno.as.arizona.edu /~impey/vatdeduve.doc   (472 words)

  
 textbody
Christian de Duve, scientist, explains that the history of life on Earth is written in the cells and molecules of existing organisms.
for the first cellular structures.” De Duve concludes that today it is almost a matter of dogma that the evolution of life did include a period where RNA was the predominant biological macromolecule (De Duve 432).
Whatever theory of the origin of life eventually is proven, it is obvious to scientists and observers that life was bound to arise where conditions and timing appropriate.
www.mindspring.com /~sealpup/website/textbody.htm   (1925 words)

  
 Castries, Christian de --  Encyclopædia Britannica
More results on "Castries, Christian de" when you join.
U.S. jazz musician Charlie Christian was one of the first guitarists to produce improvised pieces using electrically amplified equipment.
Christians consider Saint Stephen to be their first martyr.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9000649?tocId=9000649   (724 words)

  
 Nat' Academies Press, Size Limits of Very Small Microorganisms: Proceedings of a Workshop (1999)
The Panel 1 moderator, Dr. de Duve, opened the workshop by commenting on some theoretical calculations of the lower limits of cell size based on the assumptions and calculations shown in Box 1 (see pp.
Dr. de Duve estimated the contribution of the genome to the dry weight of a cell the size of E. coli to be on the order of 4 to 6%.
Constraints on Minimal Cell Size Imposed by Number and Size of Ribosomes Dr. de Duve initially emphasized the importance of the ribosome as a major determinant of minimal cell size, noting that even a single ribosome, if surrounded by membrane and wall, would occupy a sphere of 50 to 60 nm in diameter.
books.nap.edu /books/0309066344/html/5.html   (8324 words)

  
 Duve, Christian Rene de --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The French author and diplomat François-Auguste-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand, was one of his country's first Romantic writers.
Protestant Christian magazine that seeks to offer "the best in Christian reading." Contains sample articles on such disparate issues as religious freedoms and children of divorce.
Explore Santiago De Cuba, the second largest city in Cuba, with a diverse population and culture.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9031629?tocId=9031629   (915 words)

  
 July_00
Re: Post-doctoral position available for research in trypanosomatids at the Research Unit for Tropical Diseases of the Christian de Duve Institute of Cellular Pathology (ICP), in Brussels, Belgium.
A post-doctoral position is available at the Research Unit for Tropical Diseases of the Christian de Duve Institute of Cellular Pathology (ICP), in Brussels, Belgium.
The ICP is an international institute for biomedical research, located on the campus of the Medical Faculty of the Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL) in Brussels.
www.fao.org /paat/html/body_july_00.htm   (223 words)

  
 Christian de Duve   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Christian de Duve, a 1974 Nobelist in medicine and...
The intellectual path de Duve takes is solid, drawing heavily on...
Se le otorgó el Premio Nobel de Fisiología o Medicina en el año 1974 compartido con Albert Calude y George Emil Palde.
enciclopedia.cc /Christian_de_Duve   (342 words)

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