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Topic: Christological argument


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 Christological argument - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Christological argument for the existence of God is a relatively modern argument.
It is an indirect argument based on the claims of Jesus Christ.
The Christological argument is typically in the context of arguments for the existence of God and does not necessarily use the trilemma.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Christological_argument   (545 words)

  
 Summit Ministries: Resources: Essays
This argument is inconclusive, uncharitable, and historiographically and philosophically faulty.
Not only does this argument beg the question by assuming inerrancy for that portion of Scripture where verification is still lacking, not only is it unfairly disguising expectation as proof or argument, but it fails to note sufficiently the ambiguity of previous investigations.
Arguments based upon our theology have been, and will continue to be determined by the assessment of the data that is as objective and evenhanded as possible.
www.summit.org /resource/essay/show_essay.php?essay_id=26   (4546 words)

  
 Christology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The different Christological views of various Christian sects have led to accusations of heresy, and subsequent religious persecution.
In many cases, a sect's unique christology is its chief distinctive feature; in these cases it is common for the sect to be known by the name given to its christology.
Christian Truth and its Defense Exposition and defense on the teachings of Christ and proofs of His historicity as told in the gospels.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Christological   (814 words)

  
 Arguments for the existence of God   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The religious or Christological argument isspecific to religions such as Christianity, and asserts that for example Jesus Christ 's life as written in the New Testament establishes his credibility, so we can be sure of the truth of his statements about God.
The Cosmological argument, which argues that God musthave been around at the start of things in order to be the "first cause".
The Teleological argument, which argues that sincethe universe is highly non-random, it must have been designed by an intelligent designer, i.e.
www.therfcc.org /arguments-for-the-existence-of-god-5572.html   (544 words)

  
 Christological argument   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In such a context the historicity of Jesus of Nazareth naturally takes on enhanced urgency; the historian's questions of documentation authentication and the tend to be removed from ordinary historical to take supportive places within Christological theology.
It then to recast questions about Jesus' identity to that since Jesus made those claims either were true and Jesus was in fact or else he was a charlatan or a madman.
This sort of argument is often criticized a false dilemma ; thus it may be said that ignores for instance the possibility that Jesus a moral philosopher but that his reported have been distorted or misrepresented in order bolster claims of divinity.
www.freeglossary.com /Christological_argument   (432 words)

  
 Critique of Meier's A Marginal Jew   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
I will show that the two arguments are compatible and mutually reinforcing, with the added benefit that many of the peculiarities that puzzled Meier are easily explained as a consequence of the Luke connection.
The argument from style is presented in the lengthy footnotes 41 and 42, pp.
An argument for the core authenticity of the Testimonium as a whole is given by its theological thrust.
members.aol.com /FlJosephus/meierCrt.htm   (2664 words)

  
 Arguments For The Existence Of God   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
For some, the existence of evil is one of the great arguments against the existence of God; for others, it is one of the great arguments in his favor.
The religious or Christological argument is specific to religions such as Christianity, and asserts that for example Jesus Christ's life as written in the New Testament establishes his credibility, so we can be sure of the truth of his statements about God.
The Teleological argument, which argues that since the universe is highly non-random, it must have been designed by an intelligent designer, i.e.
www.wikiverse.org /arguments-for-the-existence-of-god   (675 words)

  
 Christology and the Synoptic Problem: An argument for Markan priority (SNTSMS 94; Cambridge: CUP, 1997)
Deploying a new comparative redaction-critical approach to the problem, Dr Head argues that the critical basis of the standard christological argument for Markan priority is insecure and based on anachronistic scholarly concerns.
Nevertheless, in a through-going comparative reappraisal of the christological outlooks of Matthew and Mark the author finds decisive support for the hypothesis of Markan priority, arguing that Matthew was a developer rather than a corrector of Mark.
The idea did not play a major role in the actual argument of the book, but once it was addressed it should have been demonstrated properly rather than in a casual statement in the conclusion to a chapter.
www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk /Tyndale/staff/Head/Christology.htm   (921 words)

  
 [No title]
The argument is known as the "cosmological argument." It derives its name from the word _kosmos,_ the Greek word for world.
This argument, which I consider to be both cogent and persuasive, was first formulated by the Greek philosopher Aristotle.
However, this argument does illustrate that believing in God is rational, and in this case is the only rational alternative in explaining the universe.
www.wincom.net /~mcunning/pad.html   (2120 words)

  
 Christological argument - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
It then attempts to recast questions about Jesus' identity to argue that since Jesus made those claims, either they were true and Jesus was in fact divine, or else he was a charlatan or a madman.
This sort of argument is often criticized as a false dilemma; thus it may be said that this ignores, for instance, the possibility that Jesus was a moral philosopher, but that his reported teachings have been distorted or misrepresented in order to bolster claims of divinity.
See: Arguments for the existence of God — Christology
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Christological_argument   (565 words)

  
 Logic, Ontology, and Ockham's Christology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Section I examines a general argument for this contention, while section II focuses on the more specific charge that the two-name theory prevents Ockham from dealing adequately with problematic Christological propositions such as 'Christ as man began to exist'.
If this is indeed Geach's argument, then it suffices to point out in rebuttal that neither he nor anyone else has established the central premise that the two-name theory naturally gives /300/ rise to a nominalistic account of signification.
In fact, he seems willing to admit that Aristotle's (putative) argument for the conclusion that every humanity is a man meets all the conditions (validity, self-evident nature of premises, etc.) necessary for its being a demonstration in the strict sense.
www.nd.edu /~ndphilo/papers/logont.htm   (11456 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Josh McDowell
McDowell and Stewart have also popularised the arguments of other apologists in the Christian countercult movement, particularly the work of Walter Martin, in the Handbook of Today's Religions.
In their criticisms of cults and occult beliefs McDowell and Stewart concentrate on doctrinal apologetic questions, especially pertaining to the deity of Christ, and pointing out heretical beliefs in the non-orthodox religious groups they profile.
The Christian countercult movement or discernment ministries is the collective designation for many mostly unrelated ministries and individual Christians who oppose mainly for doctrinal and theological reasons and often with a missionary or apologetic purpose non-mainstream Christian and non-Christian religious groups, which they often call cults.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Josh-McDowell   (2108 words)

  
 Christological argument   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The Christological argument for the existence of God is a relativelymodern argument.
It is an indirect argument based on the claims of JesusChrist.
This sort of argument is often criticized as a false dilemma ; thus itmay be said that this ignores, for instance, the possibility that Jesus was a moral philosopher, but that his reported teachingshave been distorted or misrepresented in order to bolster claims of divinity.
www.therfcc.org /christological-argument-97600.html   (416 words)

  
 Fideism biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
A more widely used meaning for the term is that fideism essentially teaches that reason is more or less irrelevant to faith.
Specifically, fideism teaches that arguments for the existence of God are fallacious and irrelevant, and have nothing to do with the truth of Christian theology.
Cf., Christological argument Presuppositional apologetics is a system of Christian apologetics that treats the existence of God and the authority of Scripture as axiomatic, the "givens" or faith assumptions without which any theological discussion lacks meaning.
fideism.biography.ms   (606 words)

  
 Arguments for the existence of God   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Christological argument is specific to Christianity - become a Christian and believe in God
There have also been some arguments against the existence of God.
It uses material from the wikipedia article Arguments for the existence of God.
www.eurofreehost.com /ar/Arguments_for_the_existence_of_God.html   (255 words)

  
 "No Such Custom": An Exposition of I Corinthians 11:2-16
The third argument asserts that Paul was talking about women wearing head coverings during any kind of prayer, but that head coverings were a cultural item of that time and thus are not required of Christian women today.
The third argument admits that Paul was talking about women wearing head coverings, most probably during congregational prayers, but asserts that this was only a social custom of the day and thus is not binding on the church today.
Paul's argument here is not that the woman who has long hair may dispense with the head-covering, but rather that the fact that she already has one type of covering shows she is to wear a head-covering.
bible.ovc.edu /terry/articles/headcovr.htm   (10625 words)

  
 [No title]
Instead of a universally valid argument designed to vanquish all possible counter-arguments, the indirect argument avoids direct treatment of all the material issues involved, and takes the form of a case made to convince a certain set of people to think about a particular issue in a certain way.
The force of the argument is not meant to be universally applicable; it remains an "incomplete proof" (TI 6, 29f.).
The argument of the work should be read, then, as a "case" rather than a deduction; and as having an unsystematic, inductive character, rather than a two-stage form.
www.thomist.org /journal/1992/924aHeal.htm   (6490 words)

  
 Josh McDowell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In that tradition apologists tend to present positive arguments to commend belief in Christ by emphasising historical and legal proofs to establish the authenticity of the biblical texts and the divinity of Christ.
In books such as Evidence That Demands A Verdict, The Resurrection Factor, and He Walked Among Us, McDowell has arranged his arguments by pleading for a cumulative case of evidences, such as archaeological discoveries, the extant manuscripts of the biblical texts, fulfilled prophecies, and the miracle of the resurrection.
He has also collated apologetic arguments concerning the doctrine of Christ's deity as in Jesus: A Biblical Defense of His Deity.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Josh_McDowell   (1451 words)

  
 The ordination of women in the Roman Catholic Church
The fact that Christ is a man, the argument goes, shows that, by God’s own revealed will, it takes a male to preside over the church; hence, only men can convincingly represent Christ.
This argument must be rejected, for it places masculinity in a privileged position in the hypostatic union of the divine nature and the human nature in the one Person of the God-Man. The tradition expressed this point as follows:
Hence, the argument of some reformers that this practice amounted to the exclusion of the laity from the “true sacrament” is a doctrinaire overstatement, a sample of conceit bred by “knowledge”.
www.womenpriests.org /classic/beeck.asp   (3572 words)

  
 The Sacrifice of the Mass and the “One and the Many Problem” in Hebrews   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Comment:  The author to the Hebrews develops his argument with a series of antitheses that contrast the perfect high priesthood of Jesus to the imperfect Levitical priesthood.
Analysis:   The argument in 7:23-25 is designed to show how it is possible for Jesus to completely save sinners.
Analysis:   The argument continues to assert the superiority of the one sacrifice to the many sacrifices.
members.aol.com /epologist/oneandmany.htm   (3975 words)

  
 Theology of Icons: A Protestant perspective   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The Christological and Trinitarian debates paved the way for philosophical ideas to be incorporated into the theology of icons at the time when the practice of icons operated on the level of popular religion.
Constantine V brought the polemic onto the christological level and 'introduced Christ as a person incapable of being represented in iconic form'.
This concept was incorporated into Christological formulas by St. Athanasius and St. Basil, who were quoted on numerous occasions by the defenders of icons throughout iconoclastic controversy showing the relationship between the image and the prototype.
www.xpucmoc.org /icon.htm   (18353 words)

  
 Jesus -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The (Click link for more info and facts about Christological argument) Christological argument attempts to prove the existence of God based on the existence of Jesus and his claims about himself as presented in the gospels.
It is not the case that all scholars reject Jesus' divinity, yet some may choose to describe the social and cultural implications of claiming divinity in the (Click link for more info and facts about 1st century) 1st century.
There is considerable argument between religious and academic factions as to whether Mary was their mother, if they were Jesus' half-brothers from a prior marriage of Joseph, or if they were simply cousins.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/j/je/jesus.htm   (4915 words)

  
 Arguments for the existence of God
However, atheists also experience intense emotional experiences, fortuitous coincidences, and striking insights, though generally not in response to prayer or worship.
These believers note that the Christian faith teaches salvation is by faith, and that faith is reliance upon the faithfulness of God, which has little to do with the believer's ability to comprehend that in which he trusts.
A satirical compilation of many real or alleged arguments.
www.fact-index.com /a/ar/arguments_for_the_existence_of_god.html   (510 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Epistle To the Hebrews   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Sensible and concise, witty and wise, the authors offer compelling arguments for and defenses of every aspect of Christian belief, including faith and reason, Yod's nature, creation and evolution, providence and free will, miracles, the problem of evil, the Bible's historical reality, Christianity and other religions, and objective truths.
This doctrine of the priestly office of Christ forms the chief subject-matter of the Christological argument and the highest proof of the pre-eminence of the New Covenant over the Old.
In the Christological expositions of the letter other doctrines are treated more or less fully.
bobmacdonald.gx.ca /ceepistle.htm   (2708 words)

  
 Biblica 83 (2002) John J. KILGALLEN
By itself, the Pentecost speech is a forceful argument that Jesus is Lord and Messiah of Israel; this is an intellectual argument, not a direct or explicit appeal to conversion, to practical action
It is to this second purpose of the Pentecostal speech that we turn, in particular to study its argumentation and its presuppositions.
The important thing to note about this argument, for our purposes, is that this entire argument hangs on everyone’s acceptance of the statement that the Messiah is Lord of David, or, to put it another way, the entire argument hangs on the correctness of the statement that the Messiah is Lord.
www.bsw.org /project/biblica/bibl83/Comm04m.html   (6788 words)

  
 What is your most basic argument for/against "Jesus is God"? - TheologyWeb Campus
For me the most basic argument against the divinity of Jesus Christ is that Scripture doesn’t teach it (don’t jeer, Trinitarians, I value the Bible too!).
Considering the revolutionary character of this doctrine and its importance in the “orthodox” scheme of salvation it is simply inconceivable that the NT authors should have failed to set out a detailed and consistent “high” Christology.
This is not intended as a complete argument, you said you didn't want a whole lot of cites, so I only tossed in 1 verse relevant to each question.
www.theologyweb.com /forum/showthread.php?t=35967   (3161 words)

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