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Topic: Chronology of Babylonia and Assyria


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  BABYLONIA AND ASSYRIA - LoveToKnow Article on BABYLONIA AND ASSYRIA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The alluvial plain of Babylonia was called Edin, the Eden of Gen. ii., though the name was properly restricted to the plain on the western bank of the river where the Bedouins pastured the flocks of their Babylonian masters.
After the Kassite conquest of the country, northern Babylonia came to be known as Kar-Duniyas, the wall of the god D~iniyas, from a line of fortification similar to that built by Nebuchadrezzar between Sippara and Opis, so as to defend his kingdom from attacks from the north.
One of these is the so-called Synchronous History of Assyria and Babylonia, consisting of brief notices, written by an Assyrian, of the occasions on which the kings of the two co~intries had entered into relation, hostile or otherwise, with one another; a second is the Babylonian Chronicle discovered by Dr Th.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /B/BA/BABYLONIA_AND_ASSYRIA.htm   (4940 words)

  
 Assyria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Assyria in earliest historical times referred to a region on the Upper Tigris river, named for its original capital, the city of Ashur.
Assyria proper was located in a mountainous region, extending along the Tigris as far as the high Gordiaean or Carduchian mountain range of Armenia, sometimes called the "Mountains of Ashur".
Babylonia became independent; their king Nabopolassar, along with Cyaxares of Media, destroyed Nineveh in 612 BC, and Assyria fell.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Assyria   (1846 words)

  
 Assyria
Assyria, a country named after its original capital city, Asshur on the Tigris, was originally a colony of Babylonia, and was ruled by viceroys from that kingdom.
It was a mountainous region lying to the north of Babylonia, extending along the Tigris as far as to the high mountain range of Armenia, the Gordiaean or Carduchian mountains.
In 1120 BC, Tiglath-Pileser I, the greatest of the Assyrian kings, "crossed the Euphrates, defeated the kings of the Hittites, captured the city of Carchemish, and advanced as far as the shores of the Mediterranean." He may be regarded as the founder of the first Assyrian empire.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/a/as/assyria.html   (756 words)

  
 Assyria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Assyria in earliest historical times referred to a region on the Upper Tigris river, named for its original capital, the city of Asshur (or Ashshur).
Assyria proper was located in a mountainous region, extending along the Tigris as far as the high Gordiaean or Carduchian mountain range of Armenia, sometimes called the "Mountains of Asshur".
This region seems to have been ruled from Akkad (northern Babylonia) in its earliest stages, being part of Sargon and Naram-Sin's empire.
www.eastcleveland.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Assyria   (1890 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Assyria
In treating of Assyria it is extremely difficult not to speak at the same time of its sister, or rather mother country, Babylonia, as the peoples of these two countries, the Semitic Babylonians and Assyrians, are both ethnographically and linguistically the same race, with identical religion, language, literature, and civilization.
Geographically, Assyria occupies the northern and middle part of Mesopotamia, situated between the rivers Euphrates and Tigris; while the southern half, extending as far south as the Persian Gulf, constitutes the countries of Babylonia and Chaldea.
Further valuable help may be obtained from the so-called "Synchronous History" of Babylonia and Assyria, which consists of a brief summary of the relations between the two countries from the earliest times in regard to their respective boundary lines.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/02007c.htm   (9808 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Babylonia
The cornfields of Babylonia were mostly in the south, where Larsa, Lagash, Erech, and Calneh were the centres of an opulent agricultural population.
It is remarkable that Babylonia possesses no bronze period, but passed from copper to iron; though in later ages it learnt the use of bronze from Assyria.
In North Babylonia we have again, southernmost, the city of Kish, probably the Biblical Cush (Gen., x, 8); its ruins are under the present mound El-Ohemir, eight miles east of Hilla.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/02179b.htm   (9505 words)

  
 Assyria Article, Assyria Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Assyria, a country named after its original capital city, Asshur onthe Tigris, was originally a colony of Babylonia, and was ruled by viceroys from that kingdom.
It was a mountainous region lying to the north of Babylonia, extending along the Tigris as far as to the high mountain rangeof Armenia, the Gordiaean or Carduchian mountains.
Froman early period Assyria had entered on a conquering career, and having absorbed Babylon, the kingdoms of Hamath, Damascus, and Samaria, it conquered Phoenicia, and made Judea feudatory, andsubjected Philistia and Idumea.
www.anoca.org /bc/kings/assyria.html   (757 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Chronology of Babylonia and Assyria Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The later chronology of Assyria has long been fixed, thanks to the lists of limmi, or archons, who gave their names in succession to their years of office.
One of these is the so-called "Synchronous History of Assyria and Babylonia," consisting of brief notices, written by an Assyrian, of the occasions on which the kings of the two countries had entered into relation, hostile or otherwise, with one another; a second is the Babylonian Chronicle discovered by Dr Th.
Their chronology is debated, because there is a King List A and a Babylonian King List B. Hereby we follow the regnal years of List A, because those are widely used, although we believe that the other list is better, at least for one or two reigns out of the first six.
www.ipedia.com /chronology_of_babylonia_and_assyria.html   (1984 words)

  
 Assyria   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Assyria, a country named after its original capital city, Asshur on the Tigris, was originally a colony of BabylonBabylonia/, and was ruled by viceroys from that kingdom.
From an early period Assyria had entered on a conquering career, and having absorbed Babylon, the kingdoms of HamaHamath, Damascus, and Samaria, it conquered Phoenicia, and made Judea feudatory, and subjected Philistia and Idumea.
In 727 BC the Babylonians threw off the rule of the Assyrians, under the leadership of the powerful Chaldean prince Merodach-baladan (2 Kings 20:12), who, after twelve years, was subdued by Sargon II of AssyriaSargon, who now reunited the kingdom, and ruled over a vast empire.
www.infothis.com /find/Assyria   (1034 words)

  
 Egyptian New Kingdom, Babylonia, Assyria, Hittites, etc.
The chronology for the period before the Canon of Kings, 1400 down to 700, is secured by the "Assyrian Kinglist" and a reported eclipse of the sun that can be dated to 15 June 763 BC.
Assyria was at first kept in check and then in vassalage to this power, one of the more obscure but more important of the Second Millennium BC.
In the earlier chronologies, there is the inconvenience that the events of the reign of Ramesses II do not match up with the corresponding Hittite dates for these events.
www.friesian.com /notes/newking.htm   (7966 words)

  
 Assyriology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Assyriology is the historical and archaeological study of ancient Mesopotamia.
The field covers not just Assyria but also that nation's eventual conqueror, Babylonia and the predecessor of both civilisations, Sumer.
The large number of cuneiform clay tablets preserved by these cultures provide an enormous resource for the study of the period and the region's (and the world's) first cities such as Ur are archaeologically invaluable as for studying the growth of urbanisation.
www.eastcleveland.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Assyriology   (165 words)

  
 Assyria Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In (745 BC) the crown was seized by a military adventurer called Pul, who assumed the name of Tiglath-Pileser III.
In 721, Babylon threw off the rule of the Assyrians, under the powerful Chaldean prince Merodach-baladan (2 Kings 20:12), and Sargon, unable to contain the revolt, turned his attention again to Syria, Urartu, and the Medes, penetrating the Iranian Plateau as far as Mt. Bikni, before returning in 710 and retaking Babylon.
Babylonia became independent, and their king Nabopolassar, along with Cyaxares of Media, destroyed Nineveh in 612 BC, and Assyria fell, in fulfillment of the prophecies of Isaiah (10:5–19), Nahum (3:19), and Book of ZephaniahZephaniah(3:13).
www.echostatic.com /Assyria.html   (1516 words)

  
 Articles - Chronology of the Ancient Near East   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The chronology of Babylon and Assur can be aligned by the list of wars and treaties between the two cities from the time of king Ashurbanipal.
The principal points of uncertainty, due to gaps in the text, concern the length of Dynasties IV and VIII; for the reading of the figure giving the length of the former is disputed, and the summary at the close of the latter omits to state its length.
In his revised scheme of chronology, published in 1903, Lehmann-Haupt retained his emendation of Sennacherib's figure, and was in his turn influenced by Marquart's method of reconciling the dynasties of Berossus with the Kings' List.
gaple.com /articles/Short_chronology?mySession=8ff042fb94d9b5f2b421b...   (3964 words)

  
 Babylonia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A History of the Jews in Babylonia: From Shapur I to Shapur II (Studia Post Biblica - Supplements to the Journal for the Study of Judaism, No 12, Part 3)
The volumes present a rather rare glimpse at a long period in the history of Judaism in Mesopotamia (ca.
A History of the Jews in Babylonia: The Age of Shapur II (Studia Post Biblica - Supplements to the Journal for the Study of Judaism, No 14, Part 4)
www.freeglossary.com /Babylonian_Empire   (348 words)

  
 The 'King's Calendar': The Secret of Qumran By R.P. BenDedek
The specific purpose of this chapter is to examine 'one' specific redactorial chronological error, and its disastrous effect on the chronologies for this period in history.
We look at people such as Shalmaneser of Assyria and his descendants, and the kings of Syria from Ben-Hadad I to Hazael (who killed Jehoram of Israel and Ahaziah of Judah).
It records the year in which each person was born, as well as the age of their fathers.
kingscalendar.com /.../Research_bible_dates_viewnews_id_132.html   (2613 words)

  
 Internet Ancient History Sourcebook: Mesopotamia
Each of its four sides is divided into five compartments of sculpture representing the tribute brought to the Assyrian King by vassal princes, Jehu of Israel being among the number.
There are a number of problems in the various proposed chronologies of ancient Mediterranean cultures.
This is a clear explanation of "Biblical Chronology." It's not scientific, but shows the problem for literalists: the Biblical data seems to put the days of the Biblical patriarchs (none of whom are witnessed outside the Bible) and the exodus, much earlier than most scholar's estimates.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/ancient/asbook03.html   (1172 words)

  
 A History of Babylonia and Assyria--Volume I
The progress of Assyriology in the past twenty years has been so rapid that every book on the history of Babylonia and Assyria published prior to 1880 is hopelessly antiquated, and many issued much later would need extensive revision.
The first clue which led to the rediscovery of the ancient language of Babylonia and of Assyria was not found in either of these two lands.
The story of its finding is worth the telling, not only because it is necessary to any just appreciation of our present knowledge of Assyria and Babylonia, but because it has its own interest, and is instructive as a history of the progress of knowledge.
www.aina.org /books/ahba/ahba1.htm   (19400 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Chronology of Babylonia and Assyria   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
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www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Chronology-of-Babylonia-and-Assyria   (1468 words)

  
 Revenue Assurance   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The city of Asshur (or Assur or Ashur) on the Tigris was originally a colony of Babylonia, and later became the first capital city of Assyria, to which it gave its name.
Chronology of Babylonia and Assyria Category:Iraq Category:Assyria Category:World Heritage Sites in Iraq de:Assur nl:Assur pl:Aszur es:Assur sv:Ashur
Assured Destruction is a concept sometimes used in game theory and similar discussions to describe a condition where certain behaviors or choices are deterred because they will lead to the imposition by others of overwhelming punitive consequences.
www.wwwtln.com /finance/156/revenue-assurance.html   (826 words)

  
 Articles - Solar eclipse   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This would be six years after the end of the Trojan War, as traditionally dated (1184 BC), though within the Odyssey narrative it is ten years after the war.
A solar eclipse of 16 June 763 BC mentioned in an Assyrian text is important for the Chronology of the Ancient Orient.
A double (solar and lunar) eclipse took place 23 years after the ascension of king Shulgi of Babylon.
www.worldhammock.com /articles/Solar_eclipse   (2483 words)

  
 wikien.info: Main_Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Encyclopedia : A : AS : ASS : Assyria
{{Template:Ancient Mesopotamia}} Assyria, a country named after its original capital city, Asshur on the Tigris, was originally a colony of Babylonia, and was ruled by viceroys from that kingdom.
It is also of interest that the Assyrians may have possessed early telescopes, (this is indeed of great interest.
www.alanaditescili.net /index.php?title=Assyria   (778 words)

  
 The Ancient History of Assyria, Babylonia & Sumer: History Rhymes - Do you know its song?
The Conquest of Assyria : Excavations in an Antique Land, 1840-1860
The Geonim of Babylonia and the Shaping of Medieval Jewish Culture
Family Religion in Babylonia, Syria and Israel : Continuity and Change in the Forms of Religious Life (Studies in the History and Culture of the ancie
www.a-ten.com /a10_recommends/ancient_history.html   (679 words)

  
 ASSYRIA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Mesopotamia-Arrival of the Semites-Babylonia and Assyria-Added May, 2003
Mesopotamia-Assyria-Early Princes of Assyria and Babylonia-Added May, 2003
Mesopotamia-Assyria-Everyday Life in Assyria and Babylonia-Questia-Added May 2003
www.boundaryschools.com /perley/kencon/pages/Assyria.html   (33 words)

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