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Topic: Church Slavonic


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In the News (Tue 25 Jun 19)

  
  Church Slavonic language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Historically, this language is derived from the Old Church Slavonic language by adapting pronunciation and orthography and replacing some old and obscure words and expressions by their vernacular counterparts (for example from the Old Russian language).
Although as late as the 1760's Lomonosov argued that Church Slavonic was the so-called "high style" of Russian, within Russia itself this point of view largely vanished in the course of the nineteenth century.
Church Slavonic (in various modifications) was also used as a liturgical and literary language in other Orthodox countries — Belarus, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria and (former Yugoslav) Republic of Macedonia — until it was replaced by national languages (but the liturgical use may continue).
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Church_Slavonic_language   (893 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Church Slavonic maintained a prestige status, particularly in Russia, for many centuries — among Slavs in the East it had a status analogous to that of the Latin language in western Europe, but had the advantage of being substantially less divergent from the vernacular tongues of average parishioners.
Old Church Slavonic is evidenced by a relatively small body of manuscripts, written for the most part, in the late 10th and the early 11th century.
The history of Old Church Slavonic writing includes a northern tradition begun by the mission to Great Moravia, including a short mission in the Balaton principality, and a Bulgarian tradition begun by some of the missionaries who relocated to Bulgaria after the expulsion from Great Moravia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Old_Church_Slavonic   (1660 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Church Slavonic (Language And Linguistics) - Encyclopedia
Church Slavonic, language belonging to the South Slavic group of the Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Slavic languages).
The year 1100 is the conventional dividing line between the ancestor, Old Church Slavonic, and its descendant, the later Church Slavonic, which flourished as the literary language of a number of Slavic peoples before the 18th cent.
Old Church Slavonic is the first Slavic language known to have been recorded in writing.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/ChurchSl.html   (498 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Old Church Slavonic (also called Old Church Slavic or Old Bulgarian, incorrectly Old Slavic) is the first literary Slavic language, developed from the Slavic dialect of Solun (Thessaloniki) by 9th century Byzantine missionaries, Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius.
Church Slavonic maintained a prestige status, particularly in Russia, for many centuries — among Slavs in the East it had a status analogous to that of the Latin language in western Europe, but had the advantage of being less divergent from the vernacular tongues of average parishioners.
Old Church Slavonic's first writings, translations of Christian liturgy and Biblical texts, were produced by Byzantine missionaries Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius, mostly during their mission to Great Moravia.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /old_church_slavonic.htm   (1641 words)

  
 Church Slavonic language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Church Slavonic language (ru : церковнославя́нский язы́к) is the liturgical language of the Russian Orthodox Church.
Historically this language is derived from Old Church Slavonic language by adapting pronunciation and orthography and some old and obscure words and expressions their vernacular counterparts (for example from the Old Russian language).
Church Slavonic (in various modifications) was also as a liturgical and literary language in orthodox countries — Belarus Ukraine Romania Serbia Bulgaria and Macedonia — until it was replaced by languages (but the liturgical use may continue).
www.freeglossary.com /Church_Slavonic_language   (536 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
After the Bulgarian king Boris I (852-889) converted to Christianity the Old Church Slavonic was readily accepted as official language in Bulgaria and from there it spread to Serbia, Russia, Wallachia and Moldavia.
The standard variety that developed in Russia, referred merely as Church Slavonic language, is still used today as the language of the Orthodox churches in Russia, Bulgaria and Serbia and sometimes in Bohemia.
Old Church Slavonic was written in two alphabets known as Glagolitic and Cyrillic (the invention of Glagolitic has been traditionally ascribed to St. Cyril).
www.orbilat.com /Encyclopaedia/O/Old_Church_Slavonic.html   (841 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic Institute   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The foundation of the Old Church Slavonic Institute was laid in Krk in 1902 when the Old Slavonic academy was established.
The Academy was reestablished on September 15, 1948 at the conference of the Society of Clergy of Croatia, held in Rijeka.
In 1977, a law was passed integrating the Old Church Slavonic Institute, along with the until then autonomous Institute of Language Studies and Institute of Folklore Studies, into the Institute of Philology and Folklore Studies.
jagor.srce.hr /staroslavenski-institut/en/pov.html   (551 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Old Church Slavonic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Old Church Slavonic (also called Old Church Slavic or Old Bulgarian, incorrectly Old Slavic) is the first literary Slavic language, developed from the Slavic dialect of Solun (Thessaloniki) by 9th century Byzantine missionaries, Saints Cyril and Methodius.
The Church Slavonic language (ru: церковнославя́нский язы́к, tserkovnoslavyánskiy yazík) is the liturgical language of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, Russian Orthodox Church, Serbian Orthodox Church and other Slavic Orthodox Churches.
Great Moravia (Old Church Slavonic approximately Велья Морава, Czech Velká Morava, Slovak Veľká Morava, Latin Magna Moravia) was a Slav state existing on the territory of present-day Moravia and Slovakia between 833 and the early 10th century.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Old-Church-Slavonic   (3977 words)

  
 Church Slavonic - Language - The Rusyns - Rusyn.org
Church Slavonic was based on the South Slavic dialects of Macedonia familiar to the Byzantine missionaries *Constantine/Cyril and Methodius, who in the ninth century brought Christianity to the Slavs of *Greater Moravia.
Church Slavonic initially lacked a codified standard and several varieties developed over the large extent of territory where it was used.
Church Slavonic is still actively used as a liturgical language in Rusyn churches, in religious publications, and in some cases in sermons.
www.rusyn.org /?root=rusyns&rusyns=lang&article=34   (553 words)

  
 old church slavonic language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
de: Altkirchenslawischnl:Oud-kerkslavischpl:Język staro-cerkiewno-słowiański Old Church Slavonic (or Old Slavonic, or Old Slavic) is the first literary and liturgical Slavic language taken over (or developed, depending on the point of view) by the 9th century missionaries Saints Cyril and Methodius.
Cyril and Methodius hailed from Thessaloniki and based the Old Church Slavonic on the Slavic (Macedonian) dialect used by intellectuals of the Thessaloniki region of the Byzantine Empire.
Bulgarian scholars consider Old Church Slavonic an Old Bulgarian dialect and call it Old Bulgarian.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Old_Church_Slavonic_language.html   (239 words)

  
 Finnish Orthodox Church — Virtual Finland
Churches were built in villages, and several tiny wilderness monasteries were founded literally in the middle of nowhere.
The Church has a high degree of independence in internal matters, and it is free to organize its affairs within the bounds of the law of the land, provided that such arrangements do not conflict with the accepted Orthodox traditions.
The church is sacred to the memory of the Glorification of Christ.
virtual.finland.fi /finfo/english/ortodeng.html   (1937 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Slavonic Language and Liturgy
Although the Latin holds the chief place among the liturgical languages in which the Mass is celebrated and the praise of God recited in the Divine Offices, yet the Slavonic language comes next to it among the languages widely used throughout the world in the liturgy of the Church.
Cyril died in Rome in 869 and is buried in the Church of San Clemente.
From that time onward the Slavonic tongue was firmly fixed as a liturgical language of the Church, and was used wherever the Slavic tribes were converted to Christianity under the influence of monks and missionaries of the Greek Rite.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/14041b.htm   (1083 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic - Freepedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Old Church Slavonic (or Old Slavonic, or Old Slavic, Russian старославя́нский язы́к, Slovene starocerkvenoslovanščina) is the first literary and liturgical Slavic language taken over (or developed, depending on the point of view) by the 9th century missionaries Saints Cyril and Methodius.
Cyril and Methodius hailed from Solun (modern Thessaloniki) and based the Old Church Slavonic on the Slavic dialect used by intellectuals of the Solun (Thessaloniki) region of the Byzantine Empire.
Initially Old Church Slavonic language was written with the Glagolitic alphabet, but later it was superseded by the Cyrillic alphabet.
en.freepedia.org /Old_Church_Slavonic_language.html   (270 words)

  
 The Church Slavonic E-Tutor   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Although Slavonic is far from extinct in its usage, there is a natural pressure in America to use English in the Divine Services.
Having spent my youth hearing Slavonic every Sunday, it is only now in adulthood, and some twenty years away from the Church, that I finally have come to understand the Divine Services after participating in services in English.
Since Slavonic materials for English speakers seems to be quite scarce, the author would appreciate submission of materials that might improve or enhance this program.
www.orthodoxepubsoc.org /etutorindex.htm   (616 words)

  
 Church Slavonic language - SmartyBrain Encyclopedia and Dictionary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Church Slavonic language (ru: церковнославя́нский язы́к) is the liturgical language of the Russian Orthodox Church.
During the 18th century it was gradually replaced by the Russian language and retained its use only in church.
Church Slavonic (in various modifications) was also used as a liturgical and literary language in other orthodox countries — Belarus, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria and Macedonia — until it was replaced by national languages (but the liturgical use may continue).
smartybrain.com /index.php/Church_Slavonic_language   (510 words)

  
 The Ruthenian Catholic Church   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Despite this sad turn of events, the American Greek Catholics in union with Rome continued to grow and establish new parishes; and, in 1950, Saints Cyril and Methodius Byzantine Catholic Seminary was established by the second Bishop of Pittsburgh, Daniel Ivancho, for the spiritual and educational formation of a native clergy.
In 1968, Bishop Stephen Kocisko was transferred to the Eparchy of Pittsburgh, and subsequently Bishop Michael Dudick was consecrated and enthroned as the second Eparch of Passaic.
The Byzantine Catholic Church is an Eastern Church in union with Rome; Carpatho-Rusyn in background and flavor, but indeed an American Eastern Church celebrating the Gospel in words, symbols, and action.
www.dreamwater.org /edu/passaic/history.htm   (1271 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic
Old Church Slavonic or Church Slavonic is a literary language which developed from the language used by St Cyril and St Methodius, 9th century missionaries from Byzantium, to translate the bible and other religious works.
Old Church Slavonic was used as the liturgical language of the Russian Orthodox church between the 9th and 12th centuries.
A more modern form of the language, known as Church Slavonic, appeared during the 14th century and is still used in the Russian Orthodox church.
www.omniglot.com /writing/ocslavonic.htm   (368 words)

  
 Help Me Learn Church Slavonic
My goals in learning Church Slavonic are to be able to read and pray with understanding texts written in Church Slavonic, to be able to serve and sing competently on the kliros, and to be able to translate Church Slavonic texts into English.
Although Church Slavonic is sometimes called "Old Church Slavonic," "Old Slavonic," or "Old Church Slavic," it has been revised several times throughout its history, most recently in the 18th century under the Empress Elizabeth.
The term "Old Church Slavonic" properly belongs to the form of the language that was used in the 9th-12th centuries and not to the modern form of Church Slavonic that is currently used in the Russian Orthodox Church.
justin.zamora.com /slavonic   (340 words)

  
 Our Slavic Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Slavonic language was introduced into the Byzantine liturgy by the Apostles of the Slavs, SS.
The invention of the Slavic letters and introduction of the Slavonic language into worship could be considered a genial work, a real miracle, since it surpassed all the literary attempts made in the Middle Ages.
Until the tenth century the dialectical differences of Slavonic languages were negligible and the Old-Slavonic language was used as a literary language by all the Slavs.
www.carpatho-rusyn.org /spirit/chap4.htm   (1335 words)

  
 Vernacularity: The Politics of Language and Style
Cyril and Methodius in the late ninth century, Church Slavonic (known in its earliest form as Old Church Slavonic) functioned as the language of ecclesiastical and literary culture for most of the Eastern Orthodox and Greek Catholic peoples of East Central Europe, functioning much as did Latin in the medieval West.
As the language of the Eastern liturgy, of the Bible, and of long disappeared medieval kingdoms, Church Slavonic was seen as a natural marker of confessional loyalty and a sign of the historic greatness of Serbian, Romanian, and Ruthenian culture.
As nationalist intellectuals gradually came to dominate the cultural and political establishment of East Central Europe during the later half of the nineteenth century, the status of Church Slavonic was thus steadily eroded and the ideals of religious universalism gave way before those of national particularism and political egalitarianism.
www.uwo.ca /modlang/MedRen/conf99/abstracts/fairey.html   (493 words)

  
 Orthodox church Music, Russian Orthodox church Music, Greek Orthodox church music, Byzantine chant, Church Slavonic ...
Courses for Orthodox Church Choir Conductors in Moscow - The goal of the Moscow Orthodox Church Conductors’ Courses is to train choir directors for Orthodox parishes in Moscow and beyond.
Choir of the Church of St. Prophet Elijah (Kiev) - Spiritual compositions of the Orthodox Church, along with Russian and Ukrainian folk songs.
Choir of The Orthodox Christian Church Of Christ The Saviour, a parish of the Orthodox Church in America.
stjrussianorthodox.com /music.htm   (1464 words)

  
 C-Slav241B   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Not surprisingly, scholarly discussion of Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian and Serbian Church Slavonic manuscripts and the texts contained within them is not at all rare in the published literature and conference presentations.
First, in contrast to the geographic breadth of the eastern tradition, as well as to its central role in the cultural development of several nations and (at times powerful) states, the CCS tradition was limited, in large part, to just a portion of the Croatian lands.
Historical evidence concerning the origin and earliest history of Slavonic literacy is very limited and in most cases of questionable value; moreover, Church Slavonic documents are preserved from only a century or more after the Moravian Mission.
www.humnet.ucla.edu /humnet/slavic/html/c-slav241b.html   (1454 words)

  
 Liturgica.com | Liturgics | Eastern Orthodox Liturgics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Like the Western Church, the liturgical practices of the Eastern Orthodox Church were founded on the practices of the mother Church in Jerusalem.
Among the most striking things about the liturgical worship of the Eastern Orthodox Church is the uniformity of its form, and the high degree of correspondence to the form that was in practice across the Christian Church in the sixth century.
Generally speaking, the worship of the Orthodox Church has always been in the vernacular: that is, the local or indigenous language.
www.liturgica.com /html/litEOLit.jsp?hostname=liturgica   (1099 words)

  
 Russian Znamenny Chant, Znammeny Chant, Znameny Chant
Eastern Orthodoxy was directly imported into Russia with all of its cultural appendages; the architecture for churches, the painting style for icons, and the music of the church were all included.
Russian Church music--the Znamenny Chant--was in the long past derived from Byzantium, but was no sooner on Russian soil that it encountered an entirely new medium--the musical perception of the Russian people, its whole culture and custom, and thus began its second Russian life.
Since the whole purpose of having the chant in church was to convey the holy liturgy in a beautiful and worshipful manner, it would not behoove a composer to treat the text lightly and conform it to a pleasing melody (as was the practice at this time in folk-songs).
www.geocities.com /Vienna/4612/znamenny.htm   (2184 words)

  
 Church Slavonic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Church Slavonic, language belonging to the South Slavic group of the Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see
Church Slavonic or Church Slavic (Webster's NewWorld Dictionary)
Prisoner of history: the Eastern Orthodox Church in Poland in the twentieth century.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/society/A0812207.html   (448 words)

  
 Kornelije Stankovic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
At the concert it was performed for the first time by the Choir of the Radio and Television of Serbia with conductor Bojan Sudjic, in the Foundation of Ilija M. Kolarac in Belgrade in October 1993.
Three books of Orthodox Church Music of the Serbian people published in Vienna (1862, 1863 and 1864), and 17 manuscript volumes with four part choral settings of the traditional church melodies, represent the rich inheritance that he left to the "Serbian people".
By his attitude and education as an honest Orthodox Christian, Stankovic always sees church chant as a sung prayer, and the motives for his work on the notating and harmonizing of the church melodies were artistic, historical and educational.
www.sv-luka.org /chants/kornelijestankovic.htm   (906 words)

  
 Orthodox Music Resources and Church/Home Worship Supplies
Church Slavonic is a rich and vibrant part of our Orthodox heritage.
The page is maintained by Daniel Johnson, a communicant of St John the Theologian Antiochian Orthodox Church in San Juan Capistrano, CA.
Orthodox Church Supplies of America - Everything needed for the church: icons, vigil lamps, censers, tabernacles, candelabrums, wood craved iconostasis, icon stands and more.
aggreen.net /liturgics/liturgic.html   (793 words)

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