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Topic: Church Slavonic language


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  Church Slavonic language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Historically, this language is derived from the Old Church Slavonic language by adapting pronunciation and orthography and replacing some old and obscure words and expressions by their vernacular counterparts (for example from the Old Russian language).
Before the eighteenth century, the Church Slavonic language was in wide use as a general literary language in Russia.
Church Slavonic (in various modifications) was also used as a liturgical and literary language in other Orthodox countries — Belarus, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria and Macedonia — until it was replaced by national languages (but the liturgical use may continue).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Church_Slavonic_language   (890 words)

  
 Church Slavonic language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Church Slavonic language (ru: церковнославя́нский язы́к) is the liturgical language of the Russian Orthodox Church.
Before the 18th century, the Church Slavonic language was in wide use as a general literary language in Russia.
However, as both languages are Slavic, the borrowings are usually thought of as variants of Russian words, e.g.: золото/злато, город/град, горячий/горящий, рожать/рождать (the first word in each pair is Russian, the second Church Slavonic).
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Church_Slavonic_language   (418 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Church Slavonic maintained a prestige status, particularly in Russia, for many centuries—among Slavs in the East it had a status analogous to that of the Latin language in western Europe, but had the advantage of being substantially less divergent from the vernacular tongues of average parishioners.
Old Church Slavonic is evidenced by a relatively small body of manuscripts, most of which were written during the late 10th and the early 11th centuries.
Later use of the language in a number of medieval Slavic states resulted in the adjustment of Old Church Slavonic to the local vernacular, though a number of Southern Slavic, Moravian or Bulgarian features were also preserved.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Old_Church_Slavonic   (1766 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Church Slavonic language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
A literary language is a register of a language that is used in writing, and which often differs in lexicon and syntax from the language used in speech.
Church Slavonic (in various modifications) was also used as a liturgical and literary language in other Orthodox countries — Belarus, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria and (former Yugoslav) Republic_of_Macedonia — until it was replaced by national languages (but the liturgical use may continue).
Church Slavonic maintained a prestige status, particularly in Russia, for many centuries — among Slavs in the East it had a status analogous to that of the Latin language in western Europe, but had the advantage of being substantially less divergent from the vernacular tongues of average parishioners.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Church-Slavonic-language   (2786 words)

  
 Church Slavonic language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Church Slavonic language (ru : церковнославя́нский язы́к) is the liturgical language of the Russian Orthodox Church.
Historically this language is derived from Old Church Slavonic language by adapting pronunciation and orthography and some old and obscure words and expressions their vernacular counterparts (for example from the Old Russian language).
Church Slavonic (in various modifications) was also as a liturgical and literary language in orthodox countries — Belarus Ukraine Romania Serbia Bulgaria and Macedonia — until it was replaced by languages (but the liturgical use may continue).
www.freeglossary.com /Church_Slavonic_language   (536 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Church Slavonic (Language And Linguistics) - Encyclopedia
Church Slavonic, language belonging to the South Slavic group of the Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Slavic languages).
Although it is still the liturgical language of most branches of the Orthodox Eastern Church, Church Slavonic is extinct today as a spoken tongue.
The year 1100 is the conventional dividing line between the ancestor, Old Church Slavonic, and its descendant, the later Church Slavonic, which flourished as the literary language of a number of Slavic peoples before the 18th cent.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/ChurchSl.html   (498 words)

  
 Church Slavonic language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Church Slavonic language (ru :церковнославя́нскийязы́к) is the liturgical language of the Russian Orthodox Church.
Historically, this language isderived from the Old Church Slavoniclanguage by adapting pronunciation and orthography and replacing some old and obscure words and expressions by their vernacular counterparts (for example from the Old Russian language).
Church Slavonic (in various modifications) was also used as a liturgical and literary language in other orthodox countries— Belarus, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria and Macedonia — until it was replaced by nationallanguages (but the liturgical use may continue).
www.therfcc.org /church-slavonic-language-130104.html   (377 words)

  
 Church Slavonic language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Church Slavonic language (ru: &1094;&1077;&1088;&1082;&1086;&1074;&1085;&1086;&1089;&1083;&1072;&1074;&1103;&769;&1085;&1089;&1082;&1080;&1081; &1103;&1079;&1099;&769;&1082;, tserkovnoslavyánskiy yazík) is the liturgical language of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, Russian Orthodox Church, Serbian Orthodox Church and other Slavic Orthodox Churches.
During the 17th and 18th centuries it was gradually replaced by the Russian language in secular literature and retained its use only in church.
The Church Slavonic language is written with Cyrillic alphabet while using a lot of otherwise archaic letters and diacritical signs.
church-slavonic-language.area51.ipupdater.com   (839 words)

  
 Slavonic languages
The myriad differences between the dialects and languages in phonetics, grammar, and above all vocabulary may cause misunderstandings even in the simplest of conversations; and the difficulties are greater in the language of journalism, technical usage, and belles lettres, even in the case of closely connected languages.
From the linguistic point of view, these later Church Slavonic literary languages differ from the earlier varieties chiefly in their systems of vowels; the early nasalized vowels were replaced by different later reflexes, and the reduced vowels (yers), with the exception of those followed by a syllable containing another yer, were generally lost.
The comparatively early rise of the West Slavic (and the westernmost South Slavic) languages as separate literary vehicles was related to a variety of religious and political factors that resulted in the decline of the western variants of the Church Slavonic language.
www.rkp-montreal.org /en/05slavoniclanguages.html   (5789 words)

  
 Church Slavonic on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
CHURCH SLAVONIC [Church Slavonic] language belonging to the South Slavic group of the Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Slavic languages).
History of an institution as a factor for predicting church institutional behavior: the cases of the Catholic Church in Poland, the Orthodox Church in Romania, and the Protestant churches in East Germany.
The Renovationist movement in the Orthodox Church in the light of archival documents.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/C/ChurchS1l.asp   (632 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic
The standard variety that developed in Russia, referred merely as Church Slavonic language, is still used today as the language of the Orthodox churches in Russia, Bulgaria and Serbia and sometimes in Bohemia.
Old Church Slavonic was written in two alphabets known as Glagolitic and Cyrillic (the invention of Glagolitic has been traditionally ascribed to St. Cyril).
As the other ancient Indo-European languages (Greek, Latin and Sanskrit), Old Church Slavonic had an absolute construction (it was in dative case).
www.orbilat.com /Encyclopaedia/O/Old_Church_Slavonic.html   (841 words)

  
 Church Slavonic - Language - The Rusyns - Rusyn.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Church Slavonic was based on the South Slavic dialects of Macedonia familiar to the Byzantine missionaries *Constantine/Cyril and Methodius, who in the ninth century brought Christianity to the Slavs of *Greater Moravia.
Church Slavonic initially lacked a codified standard and several varieties developed over the large extent of territory where it was used.
Church Slavonic is still actively used as a liturgical language in Rusyn churches, in religious publications, and in some cases in sermons.
www.rusyn.org /?root=rusyns&rusyns=lang&article=34   (553 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Slavonic Language and Liturgy
Although the Latin holds the chief place among the liturgical languages in which the Mass is celebrated and the praise of God recited in the Divine Offices, yet the Slavonic language comes next to it among the languages widely used throughout the world in the liturgy of the Church.
Whilst the Greek language is the norm and the original of the Byzantine or Greek Rite, its actual use as a church language is limited to a comparatively small number, reckoning by population.
From that time onward the Slavonic tongue was firmly fixed as a liturgical language of the Church, and was used wherever the Slavic tribes were converted to Christianity under the influence of monks and missionaries of the Greek Rite.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/14041b.htm   (1083 words)

  
 Church Slavonic language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Old Church Slavonic was the first Slavic literary language and was written in two alphabets known as Glagolitic and Cyrillic (the invention of Glagolitic has been ascribed to St. Cyril).
Old Church Slavonic was readily adopted in other Slavic regions, where, with local modifications, it remained the religious and literary language of Orthodox Slavs throughout the Middle Ages.
The language as it appeared after the 12th century in its various local forms is known as Church Slavonic; this language has continued as a liturgical language into modern times.
www.rkp-montreal.org /en/05churchslavoniclanguage.html   (184 words)

  
 Our Slavic Language
The invention of the Slavic letters and introduction of the Slavonic language into worship could be considered a genial work, a real miracle, since it surpassed all the literary attempts made in the Middle Ages.
The Old-Slavonic language, as it was devised by the Apostles of the Slavs, underwent some changes and morphological modifications during the course of centuries.
Until the tenth century the dialectical differences of Slavonic languages were negligible and the Old-Slavonic language was used as a literary language by all the Slavs.
www.carpatho-rusyn.org /spirit/chap4.htm   (1335 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic
Old Church Slavonic or Church Slavonic is a literary language which developed from the language used by St Cyril and St Methodius, 9th century missionaries from Byzantium, to translate the bible and other religious works.
Old Church Slavonic was used as the liturgical language of the Russian Orthodox church between the 9th and 12th centuries.
A more modern form of the language, known as Church Slavonic, appeared during the 14th century and is still used in the Russian Orthodox church.
www.omniglot.com /writing/ocslavonic.htm   (382 words)

  
 Church Slavonic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The website "Slavonic and East European collections in the National Library of Scotland" on the Web site of the National Library of Scotland describes the main areas of purchasing for Slavonic and East European accessions in the NLS and also provides a selective list of the most notable accessions.
The United Church is making an immediate donation from its Emergency Response Fund in response to a request from ACT International.
The United Church of Christ in the Philippines states that at least 65 people have been confirmed dead and 1,484 may be buried in the mud.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Church_Slavonic.html   (2005 words)

  
 Church Slavonic Resources - Help Me Learn Church Slavonic
Church Slavonic E-Tutor - The Church Slavonic E-Tutor is a program that teaches Church Slavonic prayers and pronunciation.
Church Slavonic Bible CD - This is a Bible study program that includes the Church Slavonic, Russian, Latin, Greek, and English (KJV) text of the Bible with search and note-taking capabilities.
Church Slavonic Grammar - This is an out-of-print English-language edition of a Church Slavonic grammar.
justin.zamora.com /slavonic/resources.html   (1035 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic Online
In the process of this expansion, the Church Slavonic language took on local attributes and ceased to be as homogeneous as it appears in our earliest texts.
In most regions to which it spread, the Church Slavonic language became the basis for the earliest literary language of the respective regions.
It is therefore not to be viewed simply as the language of the Church in Slavic-speaking areas, but as the common thread unifying the inchoate stages of several developing literary traditions.
www.utexas.edu /cola/depts/lrc/eieol/ocsol-5.html   (2587 words)

  
 Serebella Contents Church Slavonic language---Chu Mei-feng   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The language he used to talk to me was obscene.
The language used in the law does not permit any other interpretation.
: the Anglican Church, the Roman Catholic Church
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/contains-91173-91220-Church_Slavonic_language-Chu_Mei-feng.html   (252 words)

  
 Church Slavonic
Church Slavonic, language belonging to the South Slavic group of the Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see
Russian language: Historical Development - Historical Development The historical development of Russian is not easy to trace because until the...
Bulgarian language - Bulgarian language, member of the South Slavic group of the Slavonic subfamily of the Indo-European...
www.factmonster.com /ce6/society/A0812207.html   (444 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic Institute   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The purpose of the research is to enlarge the knowledge of the Croatian Church Slavonic Language and to find new standpoints from which the language of the Croatian Glagolitic codexes, and consequently the history of Croatian language, can be viewed.
Also, different subsystems within the Croatian Church Slavonic language are to be identified as are differences between individual texts, codexes and groups of codexes (northern and southern).
Moreover, the language of the oldest Croatian Glagolitic fragments from the 12th and 13th centuries, the morphonology of the verbs, as well as the categories of gender and dual of the declination in the Croatian Church Slavonic Language have been researched.
jagor.srce.hr /staroslavenski-institut/en/gram.html   (499 words)

  
 The Church Slavonic E-Tutor   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
This liturgical language is not simply a remnant of our Orthodox past but part of the very fabric of our communal worship of God today.
Although Slavonic is far from extinct in its usage, there is a natural pressure in America to use English in the Divine Services.
Having spent my youth hearing Slavonic every Sunday, it is only now in adulthood, and some twenty years away from the Church, that I finally have come to understand the Divine Services after participating in services in English.
www.orthodoxepubsoc.org /etutorindex.htm   (616 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Glagolitic
The ancient Slavonic when reduced to writing seems to have been originally written with a kind of runic letters, which, when formed into a regular alphabet, were called the Glagolitic, that is the signs which spoke.
At present the Slavonic language for the Roman Rite, printed in Glagolitic characters, is used in the Slavic churches of the Dioceses of Zengg, Veglia, Zara, and Spalato, and also by the Franciscans in their three churches in Veglia, one in Cherso, two in Zara, and one in Sebenico.
Priests are forbidden to mingle the Slavonic and Latin languages in the celebration of the Mass, which must be said wholly in Slavonic or wholly in Latin.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/06575b.htm   (787 words)

  
 Church Slavonic (language identification required please) - Job # 78738 - ProZ.com
We think the other language may be Church Slavonic, the liturgical language of the Orthodox Church in Russia, Bulgaria and Serbia, but this needs to be confirmed by an expert.
If the language is confirmed, the job will involve approximately one hour's work translating selected portions of text.
If you are familiar with this language please contact us with an e-mail address and we will send you the map to look at.
www.proz.com /job/78738   (211 words)

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