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Topic: Church of England


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  Church of England - MSN Encarta
The earliest unquestioned historical evidence of an organized Christian church in England is found in the writings of such early Christian fathers as Tertullian and Origen in the first years of the 3rd century, although the first Christian communities probably were established some decades earlier.
Furthermore, the movement enlarged the theological concern of the church for the ancient Catholic and apostolic character of the ministry and for the sacraments, for its pastoral ideals, and for the meaning of its fundamental creeds.
The doctrine of the Church of England is found primarily in the Book of Common Prayer, containing the ancient creeds of undivided Christendom, and secondarily in the Thirty-nine Articles, which are interpreted in accordance with the prayer book.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761578580/Church_of_England.html   (1506 words)

  
  Church of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the 'mother' and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion.
The Church of England traces its formal corporate history from the 597 Augustinian mission, stresses its continuity and identity with the primitive universal Western church, and notes the consolidation of its particular independent and national character in the post-Reformation events of Tudor England.
In Scotland, the Church of Scotland is recognised in law (Church of Scotland Act 1921) as the "national church" (although it is not "established" in the same manner as the Church of England, having fuller autonomy of governance).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Church_of_England   (2222 words)

  
 Free Church of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The church was founded by evangelical clergy in Devon in response to the Anglo-Catholicism of Henry Phillpotts, the Bishop of Exeter.
The Free Church of England is a thoroughly Protestant Anglican church body, worshipping in the Low Church tradition and holding to the principles of sola scriptura, sola fide, and salvation only by the Name of Christ.
Parishes in England are concentrated in the north and south.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Free_Church_of_England   (644 words)

  
 England, Church of. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
the established church of England and the mother church of the Anglican Communion.
During the Middle Ages the church in England was affected by the same clashes that bedevilled the relationship between church and state elsewhere in Europe.
In the first half of the 19th cent., the Catholic and apostolic character of the Church of England was strongly reaffirmed by the Oxford movement, which was led by John Keble and Edward Bouverie Pusey and also by John Henry Newman until he converted to Roman Catholicism.
www.bartleby.com /65/en/EnglandCh.html   (1570 words)

  
 England, Church of on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
ENGLAND, CHURCH OF [England, Church of] the established church of England and the mother church of the Anglican Communion.
During the Middle Ages the church in England was affected by the same clashes that bedevilled the relationship between church and state elsewhere in Europe.
This action, which created the Church of England, was occasioned by the pope's refusal to grant Henry's request for an annulment of his marriage to Katharine of Aragón.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/E/EnglandC1h.asp   (1755 words)

  
 Church of England - Theopedia
The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior province of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion, an association of mostly Anglican and Lutheran churches in Europe.
But this "broad church" faces various contentious doctrinal questions raised by the development of modern society, such as conflicts over the ordination of women as priests (accepted in 1992 and begun in 1994) and the status of noncelibate homosexual clergy (still unsettled today).
The Church of England traces its formal corporate history from the 597 mission by Augustine of Canterbury, stresses its continuity and identity with the primitive universal Western church, and notes the consolidation of its particular independent and national character in the post-Reformation events of Tudor England.
www.theopedia.com /Church_of_England   (710 words)

  
 English-Speaking Protestantism
In 1534 the Church of England separated itself from the Church of Rome because the Pope had refused to allow the English monarch, Henry VIII, to divorce his wife, Catherine of Aragon.
The definitive statement of the Church of England was produced in the form of the Thirty-Nine Articles of 1563, which combine a Lutheran understanding of justification and a reformed understanding of election and the sacraments.
Somewhat related in theology to the Baptist churches are those churches which are sometimes referred to as millenial or adventist on account of their belief in the imminent second coming of Jesus.
philtar.ucsm.ac.uk /encyclopedia/christ/esp/espessay.html   (2080 words)

  
 The Church of England and "Establishment"
The Church of Ireland, which was the Irish analogue of the Church of England, was united with the Church of England as the "United Church of England and Ireland", the rules of the English Church prevailing.
The Church of Scotland split in the 19th century over the question of independence from the state; in particular, the right of congregations to control appointments of ministers (which was limited by "lay patrons" who had the right to nominate ministers).
In the nineteenth century, the Free (or "Nonconformist") Churches, that is the non-Anglican Protestant churches in England, often sought the disestablishment of the Church of England.
ubh.tripod.com /whist/chhist/ce-est1.htm   (3045 words)

  
 Supreme Governor of the Church of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Even though the monarch's authority over the Church of England is not as strong, their position is still very relevant to the church and is mostly observed in a symbolic capacity in honour of the monarch.
By 1536, Henry had broken with Rome, seized the church's assets in England and declared the Church of England as the established church with himself as its head.
That We are Supreme Governor of the Church of England...
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Supreme_Governor_of_the_Church_of_England   (742 words)

  
 Kids.net.au - Encyclopedia Church of England -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Church of England is the officially established church of England.
Although Christians were present in England since the fourth century or earlier, the Church of England traces its roots to Augustine of Canterbury, the first Archbishop of Canterbury, in the seventh century.
Henry VIII was recognized as supreme head of the Church of England on February 11, 1531.
www.kidsseek.com /encyclopedia-wiki/ch/Church_of_England   (339 words)

  
 Reformation: Protestant England
England was far distant and isolated from the rest of Europe.
England also experienced the greatest wavering between the two religions as the monarchs of England passed from one religion to the next.
Elizabeth's greatest legacy was the spirit of compromise that infused her version of the Church of England.
www.wsu.edu /~dee/REFORM/ENGLAND.HTM   (1403 words)

  
 The Church of England
From the time of the Elizabethan settlement on, the Church of England (the Anglican Church) attempted, with varying degrees of success, to consolidate its position both as a distinctive middle way between Catholicism and Puritanism and as the national religion of England.
Under Charles I, the "popish" High-Church policies of the Arminian William Laud alienated the Puritan wing of the Church, and after the victory of Cromwell's (frequently Puritan) parliamentarians over Charles's (frequently Catholic) Royalists in the Civil Wars of 1642-1651, the Anglican Church, by now the Church of England, was largely dismantled.
The Puritan emphasis on individualism, however, made the establishment of a national Presbyterian Church during the Interregnum impossible, and the Restoration of the Monarchy under Charles II in 1660 facilitated the re-establishment of the Anglican Church, purged of Puritans, who split into various dissenting factions.
www.victorianweb.org /religion/denom1.html   (643 words)

  
 Anglicanism
The Church of England broke with Rome in 1534 because of Henry VIII's desire for a divorce and the Church's wealth.
It is this conflict between a High Church party, emphasising ritual and leaning towards Roman Catholicism, and a Low Church party, which is evangelical and more strictly Protestant, which dominates the history of the church.
The Church has increasingly attempted to address modern issues, trying to play a role in revitalising urban areas, and playing a leading part in co-operating with other world churches.
philtar.ucsm.ac.uk /encyclopedia/christ/esp/anglican.html   (764 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Anglicanism
Church, was of course employed, but always in the Catholic and Papal use of the term as signifying that part or region of the one Catholic Church under the jurisdiction of the
Church is not entrusted to the Episcopate alone, and in some of them the lay power in the synods has made itself felt, and has shown that it can be as really a master as any Tudor sovereign invested with royal supremacy.
Church is one and continuous with the Ancient Catholic Church of the country, and is an integral portion of the Catholic Church of today.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/01498a.htm   (6534 words)

  
 Church of England, Anglican Church
The Church of England is the established church in England.
The Church of England is identified by adherence to the threefold ministry of bishops, priests, and deacons and by a common order of worship found in the Book of Common Prayer.
The established status of the Church of England means that all episcopal appointments are made by the crown, and all revisions of the liturgy must be approved by Parliament.
mb-soft.com /believe/txn/england.htm   (434 words)

  
 Cities and Towns - Hometown England
England is named after the Angles, one of a number of Germanic tribes believed to have originated in Angeln in Northern Germany, who settled in England in the 5th and 6th centuries.
England comprises the central and southern two-thirds of the island of Great Britain, plus offshore islands of which the largest is the Isle of Wight.
Although being in South West England, which is the 4th strongest region in England, Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly (combined into a NUTS:3 region for statistical purposes) is the weakest area in England, with a GDP per capita of €15 366 per capita, or 73% of the EU average of €21 170.
www.hometownengland.com   (6247 words)

  
 Your marriage in the Church of England | Church of England
Your marriage in the Church of England
The Church of England is exploring ways of making it easier for couples to get married in a church outside their parish.   An example might be the parish you grew up in or where your parents live.
The Church of England believes that marriage is for life.  But it recognises that sadly, some marriages do fail.  In exceptional circumstances, the Church accepts that a divorced person may marry again.
www.cofe.anglican.org /lifeevents/weddings   (1373 words)

  
 WeddingGuideUK.com - Church of England
Although a minister of the Church of England does have a legal right under civil law to take a marriage service (regardless of whether or not either of the couple is a divorcee) each case will be taken on its merits after discussing the circumstances that led to the separation and divorce.
The Church of England considers marriage to be a life long commitment, whereby couples carefully prepare for their new life together.
It is the custom and practice of the Church of England to offer preparation for marriage for couples who are soon to be married, as well as to be available for support and counseling in the years that follow.
www.weddingguide.co.uk /articles/ceremonies/cofe.asp   (3261 words)

  
 Organisation of the Church of England | Church of England
The Church of England is organised into two provinces; each led by an archbishop (Canterbury for the Southern Province and York for the Northern).
Her Majesty the Queen is the Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and she also has a unique and special relationship with the Church of Scotland, which is a Free Church.
In the Church of England she appoints archbishops, bishops and deans of cathedrals on the advice of the Prime Minister.
www.cofe.anglican.org /about/cofeorg   (345 words)

  
 BBC - Religion & Ethics - Church of England: History and role
The Church of England is the established or state church in England.
The Church of England is part of the Anglican Communion, which is a worldwide family of churches in more than 160 different countries.
The Church of England, as the established church, fulfils a civic responsibility too.
www.bbc.co.uk /religion/religions/christianity/cofe/cofe_1.shtml   (551 words)

  
 Part V - The Reformation: Lesson No. 32 - The Church of England
This was primarily because the Reformation in England was born, not of popular religious conviction, but of political and social expediency.
Consequently, England's Reformation, subject to the whims of the country's changing political winds, came on, not as a flood, but as a tide with its ebb and flow.
Papal authority in England was restored by Parliament in 1554, and the English Church was returned to a Catholic status, except that confiscated property was not returned to the Church.
www.bible.ca /history/eubanks/history-eubanks-32.htm   (995 words)

  
 The Church of England in Early America - The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries - Divining America: Religion and the ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
True, the Church of England in the colonies suffered from a sluggish rate of growth and a shortage of clergymen throughout much of the seventeenth century.
Part of the difficulty is that some supporters of the Church of England emerged as outspoken loyalists during the revolutionary struggle, which led the ardently patriotic historians of the nineteenth century to portray all Anglicans as traitors to the cause of liberty.
The same studies have established that nowhere in the American colonies was membership in the Church of England restricted to a narrow elite of well-to-do merchants, planters, and lawyers; instead, Anglican communicants were drawn from a cross section of colonial society.
www.nhc.rtp.nc.us:8080 /tserve/eighteen/ekeyinfo/chureng.htm   (1748 words)

  
 Fundamentalism is growing within Church of England and liberal Christian churches
"Church of England: The State It's In" by Monica Furlong [buy] makes the same notes on growing fundamentalist groups although the book is primarily concerned with the decline of the Church of England (in terms of stats) rather than the proportionally increasing sections within it.
The Catholic Church is not as hateful as the fundamentalists, and is perhaps (ironically, given that historically the Catholics and Protestants have tried to kill each other for more than a few hundred years) a saving grace against the strong Evangelical groups, dwarfing all of them, even the Southern Baptists.
Sociologists and insiders on the C of E (e.g., Monica Furlong, Rowan Williams himself, etc) have commented that there is a possible fragmentation of the Church of England...
www.vexen.co.uk /religion/coe_fundamentalism.html   (1805 words)

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