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Topic: Citeaux Abbey


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In the News (Tue 25 Jun 19)

  
  Abbey
An abbey (from the Latin ''abbatia,'' which is derived from the Syriac ''abba,'' "father"), is a Christian ''' monastery ''' or '''convent''', under the government of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serve as the spiritual father or mother of the community.
It was adorned with the portraits of the chief benefactors of the abbey, and with Scriptural subjects.
The ground-plan of Easby Abbey, owing to its situation on the edge of the steeply sloping banks of a river, is singularly irregular.
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/abbey   (6407 words)

  
  Citeaux Abbey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-08)
The abbey of Cîteaux was founded in 1098 by Saint Robert of Molesme, who became the first abbot, under the rule of Saint Benedict.
The abbey was badly hit by the French Wars of Religion.
In 1791, during the French Revolution, the abbey was seized and sold by the government.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Citeaux   (354 words)

  
 Citeaux Abbey
The abbey has about 35 members, and is the mother house of the Cistercian family, which owes its name to that of the abbey.
The abbey was founded in 1098 by Saint Robert of Molesme, who becomes the first abbot, under the rule of Saint Benedict.
In 1791, during the French Revolution, the abbey was seized and sold by the government.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/c/ci/citeaux_abbey.html   (356 words)

  
 Cistercians
The Cistercian abbeys had a house for the reception of the poor, and an infirmary for the sick, and in them all received a generous hospitality and remedies for the ills of soul and body.
The abbeys of Portugal were abolished by a law of the 26th of May, 1834, those of Spain by the laws of the 25th of July and 11th of October, 1835, those of Poland disappeared before the decrees of the Russian and Prussian rulers.
The Abbey of Gethsemane, in the Diocese of Louisville, was founded by the Abbey of Melleray in France.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/c/cistercians.html   (10686 words)

  
 Citeaux Abbey -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-08)
Cîteaux Abbey (abbaye de Cîteaux) is a (A member of a Catholic church) Catholic (A monastery ruled by an abbot) abbey located in Saint-Nicolas-les-Cîteaux, south of (An industrial city in eastern France north of Lyons) Dijon, (A republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe) France.
The abbey has about 35 members, and is the mother house of the (Member of an order of monks noted for austerity and a vow of silence) Cistercian family, which owes its name to that of the abbey.
The abbey was founded in 1098 by Saint Robert of Molesme, who becomes the first (The superior of an abbey of monks) abbot, under the (Click link for more info and facts about rule of Saint Benedict) rule of Saint Benedict.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/c/ci/citeaux_abbey.htm   (519 words)

  
 Cistercians - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-08)
Citeaux, on the one hand, maintained the independent organic life of the houses each abbey had its own abbot, elected by its own monks; its own community, belonging to itself and not to the order in general; its own property and finances administered by itself, without interference from outside.
By the end of the 12th century the Cistercian houses numbered 500; in the 13th a hundred more were added; and in the 15th, when the order attained its greatest extension, there were close on 750 houses: the larger figures sometimes given are now recognized as apocryphal.
In England the first foundation was Furness Abbey (1123), and many of the most beautiful monastic buildings of the country, beautiful in themselves and beautiful in their sites, were Cistercian, as Tintern Abbey, Rievaulx Abbey, and Fountains Abbey.
www.bexley.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Cistercians   (1593 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Abbey of Citeaux
It is remarkable, however, that with the exception of one lay brother, none of the
On 4 May, 1791, the abbey was sold for the first time as national property.
In 1791, the abbey, which possessed 9800 acres of land, was sold for 862,000 pounds, and this money was used in turn for various purposes.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/03792a.htm   (995 words)

  
 Abbey   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-08)
The buildings of a Benedictine abbey were uniformly arranged ofter one plan, modified where necessary (as at Durham and Worcester, where the monasteries stand close to the steep bank of a river) to accommodate the arrangement to local circumstances.
It was adorned with the portraits of the chief benefactors of the abbey, and with Scriptural subjects.
The ground-plan of Easby Abbey, owing to its situation on the edge of the steeply sloping banks of a river, is singularly irregular.
www.yotor.com /wiki/en/ab/Abbey.htm   (6315 words)

  
 Gloss1en
Following the death of the abbot in 1598, the abbey was held in commendam, which led to progressive disorder and the beginning of religious decadence.
The abbey regained celebrity, but by the 18th century the number of monks decreased; by 1790 there were only four left.
The abbot of the French abbey La Trappe de Bonnecombe, received, by way of the monks at Oka, Quebec, the news that the pastor of Rogersville, New Brunswick, was eager to welcome French Cistercians.
www.abbayeoka.com /english/gloss1en.htm   (1750 words)

  
 Abbey : Exploring Essential Information, Data and Explanation.
An abbey (from the Latin abbatia, which is derived from the Syriac abba, "father"), is a
Priories were originally offshoots from the larger abbeys, to the abbots of which they continued subordinate; however, the actual distinction between abbeys and priories was lost by the
The buildings of a Benedictine abbey were uniformly arranged ofter one plan, modified where necessary (as at Durham and Worcester, where the monasteries stand close to the steep bank of a river) to accommodate the arrangement to local circumstances.
www.llpoh.org /Styles_and_Architecture/Abbey.html   (6542 words)

  
 4Reference || Cistercians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-08)
Being dissatisfied with the manner of life and observance there, he migrated with twenty of the monks to a swampy place ("a place of horrors") called Citeaux Abbey in the diocese of Châlons-en-Champagne, not far from Dijon (Burgundy).
In the following year Robert was compelled by papal authority to return to Molesme, and St Alberic succeeded him as abbot of Citeaux Abbey and held the office till his death in 1109, when the Englishman St Stephen Harding became abbot, until 1134.
In England the first foundation was Furness (1127), and many of the most beautiful monastic buildings of the country, beautiful in themselves and beautiful in their sites, were Cistercian, as Tintern Abbey, Rievaulx, Byland and Fountains.
www.4reference.net /encyclopedias/wikipedia/Cistercians.html   (1535 words)

  
 Cistercians Summary
By the end of the 12th century the Cistercian houses numbered 500; in the 13th a hundred more were added; and in the 15th, when the order attained its greatest extension, there were close on 750 houses: the larger figures sometimes given are now recognized as apocryphal.
In England the first foundation was Furness Abbey (1123), and many of the most beautiful monastic buildings of the country, beautiful in themselves and beautiful in their sites, were Cistercian, as Tintern Abbey, Rievaulx Abbey, Byland and Fountains Abbey.
The abbey is a Trappist - or strict observance - institution.
www.bookrags.com /Cistercians   (2822 words)

  
 Cîteaux - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Cîteaux
Abbey in the département of Côte-d'Or, northeast of Beaune, Burgundy, France.
Little survives of the medieval abbey; fine buildings from the 17th and 18th centuries remain.
The annual general chapter of the Reformed Cistercians, or Trappists, is held at Cîteaux.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /C%EEteaux   (112 words)

  
 Bordesley Abbey Project
The main focus of the Bordesley Abbey Project is currently post-excavation analysis and publication of the results of extensive excavation and fieldwork.
2006 saw the completion of an assessment of the remaining unpublished excavated areas of the abbey (in the church, cloister and eastern exterior cemetery) and of a project design for the analytical phase of post-excavation and publication.
The work of the Bordesley Abbey Project over more than thirty years is summarised in the illustrated review (2000) by the project's directors, Grenville Astill, Sue Hirst and Susan M Wright, which follows.A revised and updated version of this paper appears in volume 161 of the Archaeological Journal for 2004, published in 2005.
www.rdg.ac.uk /bordesley   (307 words)

  
 Citeaux Abbey: Encyclopedia - Citeaux Abbey
Cîteaux Abbey (French: abbaye de Cîteaux) is a Catholic abbey located in Saint-Nicolas-lès-Cîteaux, south of Dijon, France.
The abbey of Cîteaux was founded in 1098 by Saint Robert of Mo...
The abbey of Cîteaux was founded in 1098 by Saint Robert of Molesme, who became the first abbot, under the rule of Saint Benedict.
www.experiencefestival.com /a/Citeaux_Abbey/id/1977179   (460 words)

  
 Abbey of Cîteaux
The abbots of these houses were called the first four Fathers of the order, and the "Charter of Charity", work of St. Stephen, conferred upon them the right of visiting the Abbey of Cîteaux.
It is remarkable, however, that with the exception of one lay brother, none of the religious of Cîteaux accepted the pension of the State.
In December, 1841, it was sold to an Englishman, Arthur Young, a disciple of Fourier, for the purpose of establishing there a phalanstery, which, however, failed completely in 1846.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/c/citeaux,abbey_of.html   (1128 words)

  
 Citeaux Abbey - InformationBlast
Cîteaux Abbey (abbaye de Cîteaux) is a Catholic abbey located in StandnbspNicolas-les-Cîteaux, south of Dijon, France.
It belongs to the Order of the Cistercians of the Strict Observance (which has about 35 members), and is the mother house of the Cistercian family, which owes its name to that of the abbey.
In the beginning of the 16th century, the abbey was strong of about 200 people.
www.informationblast.com /Citeaux.html   (345 words)

  
 Confrérie des Chevaliers du Tastevin
Constructed in order to honour the Abbey of Cîteaux and its wine, it comprises both a manor house and buildings destined for the production of wine.
The château and its vineyards were the property of the Abbey of Cîteaux until the French Revolution after which they were considered " state property ".
In 1818; the Château and its vineyards were bought by Jules Ouvrard, son of a famous speculator and supplier of Imperial weapons.
www.tastevin-bourgogne.com /AnChateau/Chateau   (624 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Cistercians
Abbey of Thymadeuc (France), under the direction of Dom Eugene Villeneuve, continued the interrupted work, clearing 1000 acres of land, two-thirds of which are forest-lands, two thirds of the remainder either pasture or meadow-lands; only about 15 acres are capable of being worked.
In 1897 the monastery was restored to its dignity of abbey, and Dom Alberic Dunlea was
Abbey of Septfons in France, on a farm, or fazenda, at the foot of the Serra Mantiqueira, not far from the railroad between Rio and
www.newadvent.org /cathen/03780c.htm   (10223 words)

  
 Abbey Ruins of Barrow-in-Furness   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-08)
The Abbey possessed most of the Furness peninsula with it's forests and rich agricultural lands; a total of 55,000 acres were under it's rule.
Furness Abbey had various holdings in Ireland and on the Isle of Man. On Man the Abbots were given the right to nominate their own bishops for their "daughter" house.
The site of the Abbey and some of it's lands were granted to Thomas Cromwell and later passed through several hands until it came to the Cavendish family (the Dukes of Devonshire).
www.alphabase.demon.co.uk /abbey.html   (954 words)

  
 Cistercian way of Life   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-08)
It was from an Abbey of Benedictines that Abbot Robert, Prior Alberic and Subprior Stephen, together with eighteen other monks sailed forth in the Spring of 1098 to found the New Monastery at Citeaux (whence the name Cistercian) in the heart of Burgundy, France.
Their intention was to return to a more complete observance of the Rule of Saint Benedict.Early efforts at this endeavour were most disheartening, yet, the founders persevered and a new spirit breathed in Citeaux in 1112 when a twenty-two year old Bernard, with thirty companions, sought admission.
In the part of the country the best preserved are the ruins of Jerpoint, near Thomastown, Co. Kilkenny; Hoare Abbey at Cashel; and Holy Cross near Thurles - now being restored as the parish Church - a symbol of the faith of the people in the value of the cross in Christian life.
www.iol.ie /~mtjoseph/CistercianwayofLife.htm   (351 words)

  
 Catholic Culture : Document Library : Cistercian Order Of The Common Observance
Fascinated by the endeavors of these silent holy men, the Duke of Burgundy increasingly found that he preferred to be at Citeaux rather than at his feudal castle; and had a way of arriving suddenly with his court for a visit, much to the dismay of Abbot Robert.
Alberic had a great devotion to the Mother of God, and the story goes that during his abbotship she appeared to him and presented him with a white robe, intimating that this should be the habit of the monks of Citeaux, and would replace the fl robe of the Benedictines which they had hitherto worn.
Armand-Jean le Bouthillier de Ranee, born to the nobility, godson of Cardinal Richelieu, son of the secretary of Marie de Medicis, was made at the tender age of ten, commendatory abbot of the Cistercian abbey of La Grande Trappe.
www.catholicculture.org /docs/doc_view.cfm?recnum=4425   (5609 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Citeaux Abbey
Abbots coat of arms An abbot (from the Hebrew ab, a father, through the Syriac abba, Latin abbas (genitive form, abbatis), Old English abbad, ; German Abt; French abbé) is the head and chief governor of a community of monks, called also in the East hegumenos or The English version...
Bernard of Clairvaux, illustrated in A Short History of Monks and Monasteries by Alfred Wesley Wishart, 1900 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, abbot and theologian (born 1090, at Fontaines, near Dijon, France; died at Clairvaux, August 21, 1153), is considered a Saint by the Anglican and Roman Catholic Churches, and is...
During the French Revolution (1789–1799) democracy and republicanism overthrew the absolute monarchy in France, and the French portion of the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Citeaux-Abbey   (1181 words)

  
 CISTERCIANS FACTS AND INFORMATION
The next three years witnessed the foundation of the four great daughter-houses of Citeaux: La_Ferté, Pontigny, Clairvaux and Morimond.
At Stephen's death there were over 30 Cistercian houses; at Bernard's (1154) over 280; and by the end of the century over 500; and the Cistercian influence in the Roman_Catholic_Church more than kept pace with this material expansion, so that St Bernard saw one of his monks ascend the papal chair as Pope_Eugenius_III.
Citeaux, on the one hand, maintained the independent organic life of the houses each abbey had its own abbot, elected by its own monks; its own community, belonging to itself and not to the order in
www.palfacts.com /Cistercians   (1553 words)

  
 Buckfast Abbey
The reforms of the monastic observance which led to the new Cistercian Order were started at the abbey of Citeaux at the beginning of the 12th century.
The Abbey itself was immediately vacated, and it seems that the church and monastic buildings were stripped and left to decay.
Even as late as 1793, the ruins of the former Abbey were still very much in evidence, and remained so until the site was bought by Samuel Berry in 1800, who cleared most of the rubble away to make way for the building of a mansion house on the site.
www.mikekemble.com /daytrip/buckfast.html   (3491 words)

  
 Abbey, Edwin --  Britannica Student Encyclopedia
U.S. artist Edwin Abbey was one of the foremost illustrators of his time.
While still a teenager, he was hired by the New York City publishing house of Harper and Brothers and proceeded to create highly regarded pen-and-ink illustrations for the poetry of Robert Herrick and the works of Oliver Goldsmith and William Shakespeare.
Brief history of the island abbey and fortress of Lérins, founded in the 5th century by St. Honoratus.
www.britannica.com /ebi/article-9309648?tocId=9309648&query=edward   (862 words)

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