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Topic: Civil Rights Act of 1960


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In the News (Tue 21 May 19)

  
  African Americans - A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States of America - The Civil Rights Act of 1960
For instance, when the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was mired in the House Rules Committee in January of 1964, circulation of a discharge petition helped to inspire Chairman Smith to let the committee majority release the bill.
The failure of round-the-clock sessions to break the filibuster of the 1960 civil rights bill was a lesson to civil rights supporters that dominated their thinking during the early 1960s.
Thus, when the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 were undergoing southern filibusters in the Senate, round-the-clock sessions were not attempted to break the filibuster.
www.africanamericans.com /CivilRightsActof1960.htm   (1377 words)

  
  Civil Rights Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Civil Rights Act of 1866 aimed to buttress Civil Rights Laws to protect freedmen and to grant full citizenship to those born on U.S. soil except Indians.
Civil Rights Act of 1871 was also known at the time as the "Ku Klux Klan Act" because one of main reasons for its passage was to protect southern fls from the KKK by providing a civil remedy for abuses then being committed in the south.
Civil Rights Act of 1991 provided for the right to trial by jury on discrimination claims and introduced the possibility of emotional distress damages, while limiting the amount that a jury could award.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Civil_Rights_Act   (295 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Civil rights
Civil rights are distinguished from "human rights" or "natural rights"; civil rights are rights that persons do have, while natural or human rights are rights that many scholars think that people should have.
For example, the philosopher John Locke (1632-1704) argued that the natural rights of life, liberty, and property should be converted into civil rights and protected by the state as an aspect of the social contract.
A bill of rights is a statement of certain rights that citizens and/or residents of a free and democratic society have (or ought to have) under the laws of that society.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Civil-rights   (8532 words)

  
 CongressLink - A Resource for Teachers Providing Information About the U.S. Congress
Although civil rights had a long history as a political and legislative issue, the 1960s marked a period of intense activity by the federal government to protect minority rights.
When Kennedy did act in June 1963 to propose a civil rights bill, it was because the climate of opinion and the political situation forced him to act.
When an issue is as important and controversial as civil rights was in 1963, the final bill may reflect the ideas of individual citizens, organized groups, members and committees of Congress, congressional staff, and the executive branch.
www.congresslink.org /print_basics_histmats_civilrights64text.htm   (8013 words)

  
 Civil Rights Act of 1960 -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Civil Rights Act of 1960 established federal inspection of local voter registration rolls and introduced penalties for anyone who obstructed someone's attempt to register to vote or actually vote.
In spite of the two Eisenhower civil rights acts (see: (additional info and facts about Civil Rights Act of 1957) Civil Rights Act of 1957), only an extra 3% fl voters were added to the electoral roll for the 1960 election.
Neither is considered significant (Law enacted by a legislative body) legislation, and they did little to impress civil rights leaders.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/c/ci/civil_rights_act_of_1960.htm   (143 words)

  
 Civil Rights Act 1964
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this Act may be cited as the "Civil Rights Act of 1964".
The Vice Chairman shall act as Chairman in the absence or disability of the Chairman or in the event of a vacancy in that office.
The Director is authorized to appoint, subject to the civil service laws and regulations, such other personnel as may be necessary to enable the Service to carry out its functions and duties, and to fix their compensation in accordance with the Classification Act of 1949, as amended.
usinfo.state.gov /usa/infousa/laws/majorlaw/civilr19.htm   (6221 words)

  
 AFRO-AMERICAN ALMANAC - African-American History Resource   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Vice Chairman shall act as Chairman in the absence or disability of the Chairman or in the event of a vacancy in that office.
The Director is authorized to appoint, subject to the civil service laws and regulations, such other personnel as may be necessary to enable the Service to carry out its functions and duties, and to fix their compensation in accordance with the Classification Act of 1949, as amended.
If any provision of this Act or the application thereof to any person or circumstances is held invalid, the remainder of the Act and the application of the provision to other persons not similarly situated or to other circumstances shall not be affected thereby.
www.toptags.com /aama/docs/act1964.htm   (6196 words)

  
 ::The 1960 Civil Rights Act::
Following the 1957 Civil Rights Act, Eisenhower introduced another civil rights bill in late 1958, which was his reaction to a violent outbreak of bombings against churches and schools in the South.
Though Eisenhower is not automatically linked to the civil rights issue, his contribution, including the 1957 Act, is important as it pushed the whole civil rights issue into the White House.
The act barely touched on anything new and Eisenhower, at the end of his term of presidency, was accused of passing the thorny problem of voters’ constitutional rights over to his successor.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /1960_civil_rights_act.htm   (356 words)

  
 Civil Rights Division Activities and Programs
The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice was established in 1957.
The Civil Rights Division also gives significant priority to ensuring that members of the armed forces and other persons protected by the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (“UOCAVA”) are able to request, receive, and cast a ballot for federal offices in a timely manner in federal elections.
During the past few years, the Civil Rights Division has significantly increased its election monitoring activities, particularly in the use of Departmental staff in those areas of the country where the Attorney General cannot send federal observers because the jurisdictions are not subject to the special provisions of the Voting Rights Act.
www.usdoj.gov /crt/activity.html   (10078 words)

  
 Civil Rights Movement Timeline
According to King, it is essential that the civil rights movement not sink to the level of the racists and hatemongers who oppose them: "We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline," he urges.
Asserting that civil rights laws alone are not enough to remedy discrimination, President Johnson issues Executive Order 11246, which enforces affirmative action for the first time.
After two years of debates, vetoes, and threatened vetoes, President Bush reverses himself and signs the Civil Rights Act of 1991, strengthening existing civil rights laws and providing for damages in cases of intentional employment discrimination.
www.infoplease.com /spot/civilrightstimeline1.html   (1552 words)

  
 Before The Voting Rights Act
In 1870 the 15th Amendment was ratified, which provided specifically that the right to vote shall not be denied or abridged on the basis of race, color or previous condition of servitude.
The 1957 Act created the Civil Rights Division within the Department of Justice and the Commission on Civil Rights; the Attorney General was given authority to intervene in and institute lawsuits seeking injunctive relief against violations of the 15th Amendment.
In 1960, the Supreme Court struck down one such effort, in which the state legislature had gerrymandered the city boundaries of Tuskegee, Alabama, so as to remove all but a handful of the city's fl registered voters.
www.usdoj.gov /crt/voting/intro/intro_a.htm   (996 words)

  
 African American Registry: Civil Rights Act of 1960 signed!
The 1960 Civil Rights Act introduced penalties to be charged against anybody who obstructed someone’s attempt to register to vote or someone’s attempt to actually vote.
Yet the act barely touched on anything new and Eisenhower, at the end of his presidency, was accused of passing the thorny problem of voters’ constitutional rights over to his successor.
Though the act did little to impress civil rights leaders, they were ready to acknowledge that it was again federal government recognition that a constitutional problem existed.
www.aaregistry.com /african_american_history/1814/Civil_Right_Act_of_1960_signed   (216 words)

  
 integration: The 1964 Civil Rights Act to the Present
Early in 1965 the Voting Rights Act was passed, but it did not prevent the rising tide of militance among fls; Watts, a fl slum in Los Angeles, erupted in violence, leaving 34 dead.
The issue of segregated housing was faced in the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which contained a clause barring discrimination against fls in the sale or rental of most housing.
The Civil Rights Act of 1991 reaffirmed a government commitment to affirmative action, but a 1995 Supreme Court decision placed limits on the use of race in awarding government contracts.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/history/A0858852.html   (1200 words)

  
 The Civil Rights Act of 1964
Despite Kennedy’s assassination in November of 1963, his proposal culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson just a few hours after House approval on July 2, 1964.
Section 2004 of the Revised Statutes (42 U.S.C. 1971), as amended by section 131 of the Civil Rights Act of 1957 (71 Stat.
(h) The provisions of the Act entitled "An Act to amend the Judicial Code and to define and limit the jurisdiction of courts sitting in equity, and for other purposes," approved March 23, 1932 (29 U.S.C. 101-115), shall not apply with respect to civil actions brought under this section.
www.solcomhouse.com /civilrights.htm   (6465 words)

  
 Civil Rights Act of 1964   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The web's first and only known unabashed collection of both positive and negative civil rights publications for student comparison and contrast papers, general reading, and just plain surfin'.
Act may be cited as the "\cf2 Civil Rights Act of 1964\cf0 ".
of the district, or the acting chief judge, as the case may be, shall certify this fact to the chief judge of the circuit (or in his
www.americancivilrightsreview.com /docs-civilrightsact1964.html   (3444 words)

  
 African American Odyssey: The Civil Rights Era (Part 2)
A group of civil rights demonstrators set off on Sunday, March 7, 1965, from Selma to march to Montgomery, Alabama--a fifty-four mile journey--to present a petition for fl voting rights to Governor George Wallace.
The Voting Rights Act prohibited the states from using literacy tests, interpreting the Constitution, and other methods of excluding Afric an Americans from voting.
The twentieth century brought passage of the weak Civil Rights Act of 1957, the more forceful Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
memory.loc.gov /ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart9b.html   (1058 words)

  
 Civil Rights Timeline
1960 The sit-in protest movement begins in February at a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C. and spreads across the nation.
In response, the city forms a 12-member Human Rights Commission but only two fls are included, prompting a sit-in at City Hall and Seattle's first civil-rights arrests.
The act, which King sought, authorized federal examiners to register qualified voters and suspended devices such as literacy tests that aimed to prevent African Americans from voting.
www.africanaonline.com /civil_rights_timeline.htm   (916 words)

  
 Civil Rights Act of 1960
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this Act may be cited as the "Civil Rights Act of 1960".
No injunctive or other civil relief against the conduct made criminal by this section shall be denied on the ground that such conduct is a crime.
The compensation to be allowed to any persons appointed by the court pursuant to this subsection shall be fixed by the court and shall be payable by the United States.
teachingamericanhistory.org /library/index.asp?document=483   (1540 words)

  
 Greensboro Sit-Ins: Launch of a Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights Act grants equal access to public accommodations.
The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) is founded in Chicago, a civil rights group dedicated to a direct action of non-violence.
The march on Washington is the largest civil rights demonstrations to date.
www.sitins.com /timeline.shtml   (932 words)

  
 Civil Rights Movement Bibliography
Biography of the Civil Rights worker who was murdered by the KKK during the Selma to Montgomery march.
In-depth look at the civil rights movement goes to the places where pioneers of the movement marched, sat-in at lunch counters, gathered in churches; where they spoke, taught, and organized; where they were arrested, where they lost their lives, and where they triumphed.
The struggle for civil rights in the Mississippi Delta and the role of the state in maintaining segregation and repressing the Movement.
www.crmvet.org /biblio.htm   (9798 words)

  
 US CODE: Title 42,1971. Voting rights   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Race, color, or previous condition not to affect right to vote; uniform standards for voting qualifications; errors or omissions from papers; literacy tests; agreements between Attorney General and State or local authorities; definitions
Any voting referee appointed by the court pursuant to this subsection shall to the extent not inconsistent herewith have all the powers conferred upon a master by rule 53(c) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.
The compensation to be allowed to any persons appointed by the court pursuant to this subsection shall be fixed by the court and shall be payable by the United States.
www4.law.cornell.edu /uscode/42/1971.html   (1040 words)

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