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Topic: Classical mechanics


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  Why Quantum Mechanics Is Not So Weird after All (Skeptical Inquirer July/August 2006)
Classical mechanics-Newton's view: the ball moves in a straight line at a constant speed, because that is what things do when there are no forces acting on them.
Classical mechanics-Maupertuis' view: the ball moves in a straight line at a constant speed to any given point on its travels, because that is the path of least action between the start and finish.
The "classic" illustration of this is the experiment of passing a steady stream of electrons through two slits (figure 5).
www.csicop.org /si/2006-04/quantum-mechanics.html   (0 words)

  
  A New Look at Classical Mechanics
Time in classical mechanics, by which I mean Newton's absolute time, passes at a uniform rate everywhere in space and serves as a standard for measuring the rate of change of anything that changes.
The suggestions that the classical notion of time be called into question have mostly come from proponents of either relativity theory or from quantum mechanics, both of which depart from the classical notion of time.
There is also nothing wrong with the notion of particle that occurs in that part of classical mechanics that is particle mechanics, nor with the notion that the physical universe is a set of particles and that physical objects are sets of particles and subsets of the physical universe.
home.att.net /~zei/TMKelso/classical_mechanics.htm   (863 words)

  
  Physics > Classical Mechanics
Although classical mechanics is roughly compatible with other "classical" theories such as classical electrodynamics and thermodynamics, there are inconsistencies that were discovered in the late 19th century that can only be resolved by more modern physics.
In particular, classical nonrelativistic electrodynamics predicts that the speed of light is a constant relative to an aether medium, a prediction that is difficult to reconcile with classical mechanics and which led to the development of special relativity.
When combined with classical thermodynamics, classical mechanics leads to the Gibbs paradox in which entropy is not a well-defined quantity and to the ultraviolet catastrophe in which a flbody is predicted to emit infinite amounts of energy.
www.physics.teleactivities.net /theories/central/classical_mechanics.html   (1328 words)

  
  Mechanics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Briefly stated, mechanics is concerned with the motion of physical bodies, and with the forces that cause, or limit, these motions, as well as with forces which such bodies may, in turn, give rise to.
Just as one could, in the loosest possible sense, characterize classical mechanics as dealing with "large" bodies (such as engine parts), and quantum mechanics with "small" ones (such as particles), it could be said that relativistic mechanics deals with "fast" bodies, and non-relativistic mechanics with "slow" ones.
For instance, the motion of a spacecraft is described by classical mechanics, regarding its orbit and attitude (i.e.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mechanics   (759 words)

  
 Classical mechanics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In physics, classical mechanics or Newtonian mechanics is one of the two major sub-fields of study in the science of mechanics, which is concerned with the set of physical laws governing and mathematically describing the motions of bodies and aggregates of bodies.
While the terms classical mechanics and Newtonian mechanics are usually considered equivalent, the conventional content of classical mechanics was created in the 19th century and differs considerably (particularly in its use of analytical mathematics) from the work of Newton.
Classical mechanics is used to describe the motion of macroscopic objects, from projectiles to parts of machinery, as well as astronomical objects, such as spacecraft, planets, stars, and galaxies, and even microscopic objects such as large molecules.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Classical_mechanics   (2428 words)

  
 Kids.net.au - Encyclopedia Classical mechanics -   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Classical mechanics is subdivided into statics (which deals with objects in equilibrium) and dynamics (which deals with objects in motion).
In particular, classical electrodynamics predicts that the speed of light is constant to all observers, a prediction that is difficult to reconcile with classical mechanics and which led to the development of special relativity.
When combined with classical thermodynamics, classical mechanics leads to the Gibbs paradox[?] in which entropy is not a well-defined quantity and to the ultraviolet catastrophe in which a flbody is predicted to emit infinite amounts of energy.
www.kidsseek.com /encyclopedia-wiki/cl/Classical_mechanics   (1224 words)

  
 Classical mechanics Summary
In physics, classical mechanics is one of the two major sub-fields of study in the science of mechanics, which is concerned with the set of physical laws governing and mathematically describing the motions of bodies and aggregates of bodies.
While the terms classical mechanics and Newtonian mechanics are usually considered equivalent, the conventional content of classical mechanics was created in the 19th century and differs considerably (particularly in its use of analytical mathematics) from the work of Newton.
Classical mechanics is used to describe the motion of macroscopic objects, from projectiles to parts of machinery, as well as astronomical objects, such as spacecraft, planets, stars, and galaxies, and even microscopic objects such as large molecules.
www.bookrags.com /Classical_mechanics   (3563 words)

  
 On Classical Mechanics
It is known that in classical mechanics Newton's dynamics cannot be formulated for all reference frames, since it does not conserve its form when passing from one reference frame to another.
Classical mechanics solves this difficulty by separating reference frames into two classes: inertial reference frames, for which Newton's dynamics applies, and non-inertial reference frames, where Newton's dynamics does not apply; but this solution contradicts the principle of general relativity, which states: the laws of physics shall be valid for all reference frames.
The mechanics of particles considers that the only kind of bodies found in the Universe are particles, and assumes that every particle occupies a point in space.
torassa.tripod.com /paper.htm   (0 words)

  
 Why Classical Mechanics Cannot Naturally Accommodate Consciousness but Quantum Mechanics Can
Neither the character of the basic description of the brain, within classical mechanics, nor the character of the classical dynamical laws that supposedly govern the brain, provides any basis for considering the brain correlate of a thought to be, at the fundamental as distinguished from functional level, a single whole entity.
The classical concepts are known to be grossly inadequate at the fundamental level, and this fundamental inadequacy of the classical concepts is not confined to the molecular level: it certainly extends to large (e.g., brain-sized) systems.
Some new kind of mechanics is needed to generate, from the third-person realities that classical mechanics deals with, anything with another mode of existence: classical mechanics is not conceptually constituted to create anything having a mode of existence other than the third-person mode that it deals with exclusively.
psyche.cs.monash.edu.au /v2/psyche-2-05-stapp.html   (7968 words)

  
 Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
In experimental cases where the quantization of action plays a significant role, the application of a classical concept does not refer to independent properties of the object; rather the ascription of either kinematic or dynamic properties to the object as it exists independently of a specific experimental interaction is ill-defined.
The quantum mechanical description of the object differs from the classical description of the measuring apparatus, and this requires that the object and the measuring device should be separated in the description, but the line of separation is not the one between macroscopic instruments and microscopic objects.
In general, Bohr considered the demands of complementarity in quantum mechanics to be logically on a par with the requirements of relativity in the theory of relativity.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/qm-copenhagen   (4422 words)

  
 Classical Quantum Mechanics   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Bohmian mechanics with proper time as the wave function collapse mechanism), the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics looks only at the physical situation at an "advanced time" (to misuse the concept of "advanced" somewhat), that is, before the particle traverses the slits, while the particle track exists in "retarded time".
Classical mechanics originated with analyzing a collection of masses, with each mass having a position and velocity (or momentum).
It's frequently said that angular momentum in classical mechanics is analogous to quantum mechanical angular momentum, but that spin is a purely quantum effect.
brannenworks.com /Quant.html   (12843 words)

  
 Chapter 3. Space and Time in Classical Mechanics. Einstein, Albert. 1920. Relativity: The Special and General Theory
of mechanics is to describe how bodies change their position in space with time.” I should load my conscience with grave sins against the sacred spirit of lucidity were I to formulate the aims of mechanics in this way, without serious reflection and detailed explanations.
It is not clear what is to be understood here by “position” and “space.” I stand at the window of a railway carriage which is travelling uniformly, and drop a stone on the embankment, without throwing it.
These data must be supplemented by such a definition of time that, in virtue of this definition, these time-values can be regarded essentially as magnitudes (results of measurements) capable of observation.
www.bartleby.com /173/3.html   (0 words)

  
 the Very Big Book Store: Books: Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems
This best-selling classical mechanics text, written for the advanced undergraduate one- or two-semester course, provides a complete account of the classical mechanics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies.
V. Arnold's Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics might be worth taking a look at, although it requires some mathematical sophistication for a full appreciation.
I used this book for Classical Mechanics and Classical Dynamics, and was a complete waste of time and money, the explanation of the topics is very superficial, and the mathematics are very poorly.
verybigbookstore.com /Books-1000-0534408966-Classical_Dynamics_of_Particles_and_Systems   (0 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Classical Mechanics (3rd Edition): Books: Herbert Goldstein,Charles P. Poole,John L. Safko
The development of quantum mechanics demanded familiarity with methods of advanced mechanics that no student of physics had been introduced to.
His book classical mechanics is known to be one of the most famous throughout the world, like to form an epistemological basis for the scientists working in this field.
Goldsteins Classical Mechanics is a standard reference in intermediate theoretical physics, suitable for second year theoretical, and third year experimental physics.
www.amazon.com /Classical-Mechanics-3rd-Herbert-Goldstein/dp/0201657023   (0 words)

  
 CLASSICAL MECHANICS
It is intended to provide a thorough coverage of the fundamental principles and techniques of classical mechanics, an old subject that is at the base of all of physics, but in which there has also in recent years been rapid development.
Classical Mechanics is written for undergraduate students of physics or applied mathematics.
"Classical Mechanics by T Kibble and F Berkshire is tailor-made for budding theoreticians.
www.worldscibooks.com /physics/p310.html   (448 words)

  
 Books tagged "classical mechanics" | LibraryThing
Structure and interpretation of classical mechanics by Gerald Jay Sussman (3)
Classical mechanics [by] H.C. Corben [and] Philip Stehle by H.C. Corben (1)
Essentials of introductory classical mechanics: A study guid… by Wit Busza [yongbin99]
www.librarything.com /tag/classical+mechanics   (0 words)

  
 Education/Interactive experiments/Classical mechanics resources - PhysicsWeb
A complete course in classical mechanics for college freshmen - The course includes vector arithmetic, Newtons laws, energy and fields, rotation, gravity, mechanical waves and the nature of space.
The world is subjected to the laws of classical mechanics and can include gravity/electrostatic forces between particles, constant gravity/electric/magnetic fields and air resistance.
It is possible to affect the simulation in real-time by grabbing the particles with the mouse or by changing the properties of the objects/environment.
physicsweb.org /resources/Education/Interactive_experiments/Classical_mechanics   (1873 words)

  
 Science Physics Classical Mechanics Directory   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A brief overview of chaos theory and applications in classical mechanics.
A short introduction to and description of free body diagrams which are essential for the understanding of classical mechanics.
This educational web-site tells about the main laws of classical mechanics and the history of their discovering.
www.linkspider.me.uk /Science/Physics/Classical_Mechanics   (455 words)

  
 www.phdcomics.com :: View topic - Classical Mechanics - textbook
I agree that Arnold's is THE BOOK in mechanics, but it assumes working knowledge of differential geometry and a few other things, and is IMHO not suited for self study.
Very few people will be able to pick it up and read it, without having gone through atleast one course in graduate classical mechanics.
That said, Arnold is one of the three Gods which I worship on a daily basis, the second being a certain Jerrold Marsden and third one, someone called Stephen Wiggins.
www.phdcomics.com /proceedings/viewtopic.php?t=3359   (0 words)

  
 The Grand Unified Theory of Classical Quantum Mechanics
Whereas Schrödinger postulated a boundary condition that the wavefunction goes to zero as the radius goes to infinity, resulting in a purely mathematical model of the hydrogen atom, CQM was derived from known physics, i.e.
A theory of classical quantum mechanics (CQM) is derived from first principles that successfully applies physical laws on all scales.
By applying this condition to electromagnetic and gravitational fields at particle production, the Schwarzschild metric (SM) is derived from the classical wave equation which modifies general relativity to include conservation of spacetime in addition to momentum and matter/energy.
www.blacklightpower.com /theory/book.shtml   (901 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: Classical Mechanics: Books: Herbert Goldstein,Charles P. Poole Jr,John L. Safko,Charles P. Poole   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The development of quantum mechanics demanded familiarity with methods of advanced mechanics that no student of physics had been introduced to.
rse in mechanics justified itself only as a preparation for quantum mechanics, and that was clearly the slant of the book.
Later on the slim book by Landau, Lifshitz, "Mechanics", entered the scene and showed that Goldstein's program could be made better, briefer, and that the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, clearly and sensibly derived, was the jewel of the crown.
www.amazon.co.uk /Classical-Mechanics-Herbert-Goldstein/dp/0321188977   (1185 words)

  
 Physics 308a - Classical Mechanics - Fall 1994
BRIEF SUMMARY:  Classical mechanics of systems of particles, and also continua such as fluids, including Lagrangian mechanics, dynamics of systems of particles, non-inertial frames of reference, chaotic oscillations, the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid motion, and applications if continuum mechanics to diverse physical phenomena that may vary from year to year.
            The subject of classical mechanics is part of the core of physics.
  This course treats some of the traditional topics of classical mechanics at an intermediate level, but it also includes some topics of more recent interest, such as chaotic dynamics, that will help students to see mechanics as a lively subject that is still rapidly evolving.
www.haverford.edu /physics-astro/course_materials/phys308a/phys308.html   (1490 words)

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