Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Claw of Archimedes


Related Topics
Win

In the News (Sat 25 Oct 14)

  
  Archimedes
Archimedes became a popular figure as a result of his involvement in the defense of Syracuse against the Roman siege in the Second Punic War.
One of his inventions used for military defense of Syracuse against the invading Romans was the claw of Archimedes.
Archimedes was killed by a Roman soldier in the sack of Syracuse during the Second Punic War, despite orders from the Roman general, Marcellus, that he was not to be harmed.
www.skygazer.se /theamazingsky/Archimedes.htm   (1120 words)

  
  Archimedes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Archimedes was killed by a Roman soldier during the sack of Syracuse during the Second Punic War, despite orders from the Roman general Marcellus that he was not to be harmed.
In this scroll Archimedes obtains the result he was most proud of: the relation between the area of a sphere to that of a circumscribed straight cylinder is the same as that of the volume of the sphere to the volume of the cylinder (exactly 2/3).
Archimedes probably considered these methods not mathematically precise, and he used these methods to find at least some of the areas or volumes he sought, and then used the more traditional method of exhaustion to prove them.
en.encyclopediahome.com /wiki/Archimedes   (2494 words)

  
 math lessons - Archimedes
Archimedes became a popular figure as a result of his involvement in the defense of Syracuse against the Roman siege in the First and Second Punic Wars.
In this scroll Archimedes obtains the result he was most proud of: that the area and volume of a sphere are in the same relationship to the area and volume of the circumscribed straight cylinder.
Archimedes did probably consider these methods not mathematically precise, and he used these methods to find at least some of the areas or volumes he sought, and then used the more traditional method of exhaustion to prove them.
www.mathdaily.com /lessons/Archimedes   (1638 words)

  
 PowerPedia:Archimedes - PESWiki
Archimedes first has to invent a system of naming large numbers in order to give an upper bound, and he does this by starting with the largest number around at the time, a myriad myriad or one hundred million (a myriad is 10,000).
Archimedes' method is especially interesting as it may be the first known example of experimentation in psychophysics, the branch of psychology dealing with the mechanics of human perception, and whose development is generally attributed to Hermann von Helmholtz (this work of Archimedes is not well known in psychology).
The Archimedes Palimpsest[5] (http://www.archimedespalimpsest.org/) is a palimpsest on parchment in the form of a codex which originally was a copy of an otherwise unknown work of the ancient mathematician, physicist, and engineer Archimedes of Syracuse and other authors.
peswiki.com /index.php/PowerPedia:Archimedes   (4517 words)

  
 ARCHIMEDES GREEK PHILOSOPHER AND INVENTOR - SOLAR NAVIGATOR WORLD ELECTRIC NAVIGATION CHALLENGE, THE BLUEBIRD ELECTRIC ...
Archimedes, probably tired after his work during the siege, was sitting on the ground, drawing mathematical figures in the dust.
Archimedes is generally regarded as the greatest mathematician and scientist of antiquity and one of the three greatest mathematicians of all time.
In this book Archimedes obtains the result he was most proud of: that the area and volume of a sphere are in the same relationship to the area and volume of the circumscribed straight cylinder.
www.solarnavigator.net /inventors/archimedes.htm   (2065 words)

  
 Archimedes - ExampleProblems.com
Archimedes (Greek: ΑΡΧΙΜΗΔΗΣ) (287 BC–212 BC) was an ancient mathematician, physicist, engineer, astronomer and philosopher born in the Greek seaport colony of Syracuse.
Archimedes was killed by a Roman soldier in the sack of Syracuse during the Second Punic War, despite orders from the Roman general, Marcellus, that he was not to be harmed.
Archimedes also gave a quite different proof of nearly the same proposition by a method using infinitesimals (see "How Archimedes used infinitesimals").
www.exampleproblems.com /wiki/index.php/Archimedes   (1939 words)

  
 Archimedes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Archimedes was a Greek mathematician, astronomer, philosopher, physicist and engineer born in the Greek seaport colony of Syracuse.
Archimedes invented the field of statics, enunciated the law of the lever, the law of equilibrium of fluids and the law of buoyancy.
He was the first to identify the concept of center of gravity, and he found the centers of gravity of various geometric figures, assuming uniform density in their interiors, including triangles, paraboloids, and hemispheres.
www.grandpapencil.com /projects/concepts/archimed.htm   (567 words)

  
 Archimedes - Science and Later Years - Succeed through Studying Biographies
He established Archimedes' Principle, which states that the relative weight of a body immersed in a fluid is reduced by the weight of fluid displaced by the body.
Archimedes applied the principles of levers and pulleys and built a device that allowed him to use the mechanical advantage of the pulleys to single-handedly move the ship into the water.
Archimedes had developed a system of large cranes with claws on the end that would lower down on the enemy ships, lift them in the air, and then throw them against the rocks.
www.school-for-champions.com /biographies/archimedes2.htm   (1421 words)

  
 Epinions.com - Archimedes: The Last Great Mathematician of the Ancient World
Archimedes was born in 287 BC in the seaport city-state of Syracuse, Sicily.
First, Archimedes found in his many trials and experiments, that the area enclosed by a parabola and a straight line is 4/3 the area of a triangle with equal base and height.
Archimedes was the first person in history to use infinitesimals to find the volume or area of a figure by breaking the figure into infinitely small parts.
www.epinions.com /content_4224884868   (2721 words)

  
 Biographies
Touted by many as the greatest mathematician of antiquity, Archimedes is credited with (among many other things) inventions that aided the Greeks in the First and Second Punic Wars against the Romans, such as the claw of Archimedes and the Archimedes' screw.
Archimedes is also famous for discovering the principles of density and buoyancy.
Archimedes was challenged to test the King's suspicions, and while taking a bath, realized that the amount of water displaced from the tub was proportional to his density.
tulsagrad.ou.edu /statistics/biographies/Archimedes.htm   (327 words)

  
 NOVA | Infinite Secrets | Library Resource Kit | Who Was Archimedes? | PBS
Archimedes of Syracuse was one of the greatest mathematicians in history.
In addition, Archimedes proved that the volume of a sphere is two-thirds the volume of a circumscribed cylinder.
As he wished, Archimedes' tombstone is marked with the figure of a sphere enclosed by a cylinder and the 2:3 ratio of their volumes.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/nova/archimedes/lrk_biography.html   (788 words)

  
 CAGIS Science Squad: Did you Know?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
What Archimedes had figured out was the amount of water an object displaces (or moves) is equal to the volume of (the amount of space occupied by) the object.
All Archimedes had to do was take a quantity of pure gold of equal mass to the crown, and determine whether their volumes (the pure gold and the crown) were the same, or whether the crown had a greater volume.
Archimedes took his block of gold, which was equal in mass to the crown, and put it into a pail.
publish.uwo.ca /~cagis/clubhouse/story/second/archimds.htm   (623 words)

  
 Archimedes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The [[Archimedes' screw lifts water to higher levels for irrigation]] Archimedes became a popular figure as a result of his involvement in the defense of Syracuse against the Roman siege in the First and Second Punic Wars.
It is said that he prevented one Roman attack on Syracuse by using a large array of mirrors (speculated to have been highly polished shields) to reflect sunlight onto the attacking ships causing them to catch fire.
After a number of experiments, whereby the hosts of the program tried burning a model wooden ship with a variety of mirrors, they concluded that the enemy ships would have had to be virtually motionless and very close to shore for them to ignite, an unlikely scenario during a battle.
archimedes.iqnaut.net   (1745 words)

  
 News: Professor Glenn E. Beltz Documentary on Discovery Channel
Archimedes developed the Claw to defend the coastal city of Syracuse from Roman attack in 213 BC.
The Claw of Archimedes was a boom-like weapon that swung out from behind the city wall, grabbed advancing Roman ships, and overturned them.
Although Archimedes succeeded in defeating the Roman naval attack, the city fell a year later under a land-based siege.
www.me.ucsb.edu /news/beltz_documentary.html   (207 words)

  
 Archimedes influencial people help
Archimedes also gave a quite different proof of nearly the same proposition by a method using infinitesimals; that different proof is found how Archimedes used infinitesimalshere.
Archimedes is probably also the first mathematical physicist on record, and the best before Galileo GalileiGalileo and Isaac NewtonNewton.
* ''On the Sphere and The Cylinder'' :In this scroll Archimedes obtains the result he was most proud of: that the area and volume of a sphere are in the same relationship to the area and volume of the circumscribed straight cylinder.
www.artbrain.co.uk /influential-people/archimedes.htm   (1896 words)

  
 Art Service Archimedes of Syracuse   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Archimedes became a popular figure as a result of his involvement in the defense of Syracuse against the Roman Republic siege in the Second Punic War.
Archimedes was killed by a Roman soldier in the sack of Syracuse during the Second Punic War, despite orders from the Roman general, Marcus Claudius Marcellus, that he was not to be harmed.
He proved that the area and volume of the sphere are in the same ratio to the area and volume of a circumscribed straight cylinder (geometry), a result he was so proud of that he made it his epitaph.
lt_1038.lt.ebbb.info   (2179 words)

  
 Archimedes' Claw: Scale Models
This paper was presented at the Symposium on Extraordinary Machines and Structures in Antiquity held in Olympia, Greece, on August 20-23, 2001.
A model of an Archimedes' claw as an underwater ship shaker built entirely of Legos by Richard Wright.
This model was a finalist in the 1998 Ancient Theme Lego Building Contest.
www.mcs.drexel.edu /~crorres/Archimedes/Claw/models.html   (267 words)

  
 Claw of Archimedes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Claw of Archimedes was an ancient weapon devised by Archimedes to defend the seaward portion of Syracuse's city wall against amphibious assault.
Although its exact nature is unclear, the accounts of ancient historians seem to describe it as a sort of crane equipped with a grappling hook that was able to lift attacking ships partly out of the water, then either cause the ship to capsize or suddenly drop it.
A Formidable War Machine: Construction and Operation of Archimedes' Iron Hand A paper describing the authors' ideas of the Claw of Archimedes, together with scale models of the Claw's operation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Claw_of_Archimedes   (244 words)

  
 Other Information of- Claw of Archimedes.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The Claw of Archimedes was a weapon devised by Archimedes to defend the seaward portion of Syracuse, Italy 's city wall aɡainst amphibious assault.
Althouɡh its exact nature is unclear, the accounts of ancient historians seem to describe it as a sort of crane (machine) equipped with a ɡrapplinɡ hook that was able to lift attackinɡ ships partly out of the water, then either cause the ship to capsize or suddenly drop it.
The plausibility of this invention was tested on the television show Superweapons of the Ancient World, and concluded that the desiɡn—at least as we imaɡine it today—was improbable.
claw.of.archimedes.en.moneylist.info   (1008 words)

  
 [No title]
According to Archimedes, the area of a circle is equal to the area of a right triangle, of which one of the legs is equal to the radius and the other leg is equal to the circumference of the circle.
Archimedes also demonstrated his skill in applied research when it became necessary to defend the city of Syracuse from the army of the Roman general Marcellus.
Archimedes designed a crane, called the "claw of Archimedes", which could reach over the walls of Syracuse, lift the Roman ships out of the water and wreck them.
www.swiss.csail.mit.edu /~adler/MATHCULT/minutes3.html   (4609 words)

  
 Archimedes
Archimedes is the greatest intellectual figure on this list, and the most famous mathematician and inventor of classical Greece..
Archimedes himself had a secret calculus-like technique, which he called the Method of Exhaustion, but was not widely known in classical times.
Archimedes on Spheres and Cylinders - a nice discussion of how Archimedes found the area of a sphere.
world.std.com /~jlr/doom/archimedes.htm   (1204 words)

  
 ComingAnarchy.com » Blog Archive » War Machines of Archimedes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
According to legend, Archimedes used a series of “war machines” to keep the Romans at bay during the assault on the city during the Second Punic War.
Another of Archimedes fancy weapons were an array of mirrors, or polished shields, which focused sunlight onto the attacking ships, causing them to ignite.
Instead, it is possible that instead of mirrors, Archimedes may have conceived a primitive form of napalm or one of the forefathers of Greek Fire.
www.cominganarchy.com /archives/2005/12/07/war-machines-of-archimedes   (438 words)

  
 Syracuse, Italy - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Not long after, in the early 4th century BC, the tyrant Dionysius managed to fight a war against Carthage and keep that power from capturing the whole of Sicily.
Perhaps the most famous Syracusan was the natural philosopher Archimedes.
Among his many inventions were various military engines including the claw of Archimedes, used to resist a Roman siege.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Syracuse,_Italy   (516 words)

  
 [No title]
Though the details of Archimedes personal life are little known, and there are many questions to the validity of the ones that are, many of his works are still in existence and help us decipher the important components of his life.
The Archimedes claw was a device mounted on the wall of the city, and it is said, would turn ships over completely, or it would rain showers of boulders upon their decks.
Archimedes asked the soldier to wait until he was finished resolving his problem, and it is said that the soldier was so enraged that he killed him.
www-math.cudenver.edu /~wcherowi/courses/m4010/s05/quinn.doc   (3140 words)

  
 Archimedes' Claw: Illustrations
An animation depicting the claw as a trebuchet.
Archimedes: The Ingenious Engineer by Christos D. Lazos, Aiolos Publishers, Athens, 1995 (in Greek).
A very imaginative version of the claw as an underwater "ship shaker".
www.mcs.drexel.edu /~crorres/Archimedes/Claw/illustrations.html   (358 words)

  
 Archimedes - Archimedes Burning Mirror
Along with his Claw, another device attributed to Archimedes in conjunction with the siege of Syracuse is a burning mirror that set the Roman ships on fire once they were within bowshot.
Scholars believe that such a device was made by Archimedes although it was not used as a defensive weapon.
Burning mirrors were used to defend Constantinople in 514 A.D. Modern historical reenactments have proved the validity of Archimedes burning mirrors.
www.redstoneprojects.com /trebuchetstore/archimedesburningmirror.html   (118 words)

  
 In Depth: Rise and Fall: Civilizations at War > Preview
One is the Archimedes Claw, defending against attacking siege weapons.
While no specimens remain, great time and effort was put into creating as accurate as possible a recreation of each of these devices as possible.
The Archimedes Claw, for instance was created by Archimedes to aid in the defense of Syracuse against the Romans.
www.dignews.com /preview.php?story_id=9977   (1216 words)

  
 blurredbrain v2.1 » I Have Found It   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Archimedes is an amazing figure who has new found interweb cred with the exploration of his ancient death ray being featured as an MIT class project, and on MythBusters.
Legend has it that Archimedes burned Roman ships by reflecting the yellow rays of the sun with a series of mirrors (or polished shields).
Fun fact: the type of warship the Romans used to attack the city of Syracuse had been designed by Dionysius who was also a resident of Syracuse.
blurredbrain.com /?p=170   (347 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.