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Topic: Cleisthenes of Sicyon


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  Cleisthenes of Sicyon - MSN Encarta
Cleisthenes of Sicyon (flourished early 6th century bc), absolute ruler, or tyrant, of the ancient Greek city of Sicyon.
Cleisthenes freed Sicyon from control of Árgos and took a leading part in the war of the allied city-states of the Amphictyonic League on behalf of the oracle of Delphi.
The war was waged against the city of Crisa, which had levied tolls against pilgrims to Delphi.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761568862/Cleisthenes_of_Sicyon.html   (122 words)

  
  Cleisthenes of Sicyon - Search Results - ninemsn Encarta
Cleisthenes of Sicyon (early 6th century bc), absolute ruler, or tyrant, of the ancient Greek city of Sicyon.
Cleisthenes of Sicyon (6th century BC) Tyrant in Sicyon and one of the leaders in the Aphictyoinic League, created to protect the temple of Demeter in Anthili and also the temple of...
He was a relative of Cleisthenes of Sicyon, through the latter's daughter Agarista and her husband Megacles.
au.encarta.msn.com /Cleisthenes_of_Sicyon.html   (183 words)

  
  Cleisthenes (Statesmen) - LoveToKnow 1911
Cleisthenes, the Athenian statesman, was the son of Megacles and Agariste, daughter of Cleisthenes of Sicyon.
Cleisthenes, to whom this far-seeing atonement must probably be attributed, had also on his side (I) the malcontents in Athens who were disgusted with the growing severity of Hippias, and (2) the oligarchs of Sparta, partly on religious grounds, and partly owing to their hatred of tyranny.
Cleisthenes retired on the arrival of a herald from Cleomenes, reviving the old question of the curse; Isagoras thus became all-powerful' and expelled seven hundred families.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Cleisthenes_(Statesmen)   (2974 words)

  
 CLEISTHENES OF SICYON   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
bc), absolute ruler, or tyrant, of the ancient Greek city of Sicyon.
Cleisthenes freed Sicyon from control of Argos and took a leading part in the war of the allied city-states of the
The war was waged against the city of Crisa, which had levied tolls against pilgrims to Delphi.
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=205858   (141 words)

  
 Peisistratus - LoveToKnow 1911
He was named after Peisistratus, the youngest son of Nestor, the alleged ancestor of his family; he was second cousin on his mother's side to Solon, and numbered among his ancestors Codrus the last great king of Athens.
Peisistratus, though Solon's junior by thirty years, was his lifelong friend (though this is denied), nor did their friendship suffer owing to their political antagonism.
Like Cleisthenes of Sicyon and Periander of Corinth, he realized that one great source of strength to the nobles had been their presidency over the local cults.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Peisistratus   (2167 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Cleisthenes of Athens
He was a relative of Cleisthenes of Sicyon, through the latter's daughter Agarista and her husband Megacles.
Cleisthenes also seems to have introduced ostracism (first used in 487 BC), whereby the citizens voted to exile a citizen who was felt to have too much power in the city.
Cleisthenes also seems to have introduced ostracism (first used in 487 BC), whereby the citizens voted to exile for ten years a citizen who was felt to have too much power in the city.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Cleisthenes-of-Athens   (517 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Sicyon
After the fall of the tyrants their institutions survived till the end of the 6th century, when Dorian supremacy was re-established, perhaps by the agency of Sparta, and the city was enrolled in the Peloponnesian League.
In the 5th century Sicyon suffered like Corinth from the commercial rivalry of Athens in the western seas, and was repeatedly harassed by flying squadrons of Athenian ships.
During this period Sicyon reached its zenith as a centre of art: its school of painting gained fame under Eupompus and attracted the great masters Pamphilus and Apelles as students; its sculpture was raised to a level hardly surpassed in Greece by Lysippus and his pupils.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Sicyon   (713 words)

  
 Cleisthenes
Cleisthenes (also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was a noble Athenian who reformed the constitution of ancient Athens and set it on a democratic footing in 508 BC.
Cleisthenes also seems to have introduced ostracism (first used in 487 BC), whereby the citizens voted to exile a citizen who was felt to have too much power in the city.
An earlier Cleisthenes, the tyrant of Sicyon, aided in the war against Cirra that destroyed that city in 595 BC.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/c/cl/cleisthenes.html   (430 words)

  
 Alcmaeonidae - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Nevertheless their reputation remained high, and Megacles was able to marry Agarista, the daughter of Cleisthenes of Sicyon, from whom the Athenian reformer also named Cleisthenes was descended.
This Cleisthenes overthrew Hippias, the son and successor of Pisistratus, in 508 BC.
Cleisthenes was, at first, opposed by some who felt the curse made the Alcmaeonidae ineligible to rule; the Spartan king Cleomenes I even turned against Cleisthenes and the latter was briefly exiled once more.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Alcmeonidae   (388 words)

  
 Sicyon
Sicyon was an ancient Greek city situated in the northern Peloponnesus between Corinth and Achaea.
In the 5th century BC Sicyon, like Corinth, suffered from the commercial rivalry of Athens in the western seas, and was repeatedly harassed by squadrons of Athenian ships.
During this period Sicyon reached its zenith as a centre of art: its school of painting gained fame under Eupompus and attracted the great masters Pamphilus and Apelles as students; its sculpture was raised to a level hardly surpassed in Greece by Lysippus and his pupils.
www.ufaqs.com /wiki/en/si/Sicyon.htm   (561 words)

  
 Cleisthenes of Sicyon
Cleisthenes (also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was the tyrant of Sicyon, who aided in the war against Cirra that destroyed that city in 595 BC.
He organized a competition with his daughter Agarista as a prize; the two main competitors for her were the Alcmaeonid Megacles, and Hippocleides.
A relative of Cleisthenes was the later Cleisthenes of Athens.
www.casimiro.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/c/cl/cleisthenes_of_sicyon.html   (97 words)

  
 Cleisthenes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
He was related to the tyrant Cleisthenes of Sicyon, through the latter's daughter Agariste and her husband Megacles.
Cleisthenes was subsequently recalled, along with the hundreds of exiles, and he assumed leadership of Athens.
Cleisthenes also seems to have introduced ostracism (first used in 487 BC), whereby the citizens voted to exile a citizen for 10 years.
www.anime.co.za /wiki/Cleisthenes   (635 words)

  
 Sicyon
Sicyon, starověké řecké město umístěný v severní Peloponnesus mezi Corinth a Achaea.
V Peloponnesian válce Sicyon následoval čelnou pozici Sparta a Corinth.
Během tohoto období Sicyon dosáhl jeho zenitu jako centrum umění: jeho škola obrazu získávala slávu pod Eupompus a přitahovala velké pány Pamphilus a Apelles jako studenti; jeho socha byla zvýšena k úrovni stěží překonaný v Řecku Lysippus a jeho žáci.
wikipedia.infostar.cz /s/si/sicyon.html   (471 words)

  
 Cleisthenes Summary
Cleisthenes ran for leadership of Athens at the head of a noble faction favoring oligarchy; he was defeated by Isagoras, a friend of the Spartan king Cleomenes.
He was related to the tyrant Cleisthenes of Sicyon, through the latter's daughter Agariste and her husband Megacles.
Consequently, Cleisthenes left Athens as an exile, and Isagoras was singly unrivalled in power inside the city, and attempted to establish an oligarchy.
www.bookrags.com /Cleisthenes   (1117 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
He was related to the tyrant Cleisthenes of Sicyon, through the latter's daughter Agariste and her husband Megacles.
Cleisthenes was subsequently recalled, along with hundreds of exiles, and he assumed leadership of Athens.
Cleisthenes also seems to have introduced ostracism (first used in 487 BC), whereby the citizens voted to exile a citizen for 10 years.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Cleisthenes   (596 words)

  
 Cleisthenes_of_Sicyon - The Wordbook Encyclopedia
Cleisthenes (also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was the tyrant of Sicyon, who aided in the First Sacred War against Kirrha that destroyed that city in 595 BC.
Because Hippocleides made a fool of himself by dancing drunkenly in front of Cleisthenes, Megacles was chosen to marry Agariste.
A relative of Cleisthenes was the later Cleisthenes of Athens and Agariste, the mother of Pericles.
www.thewordbook.com /Cleisthenes_of_Sicyon   (325 words)

  
 Omnipelagos.com ~ article "Sicyon"   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Sicyon was built on a low triangular plateau about two miles from the Corinthian Gulf.
After the fall of the tyrants their institutions survived till the end of the 6th century BC, when Dorian supremacy was re-established, perhaps by the agency of Sparta, and the city was enrolled in the Peloponnesian League.
In the 5th century BC Sicyon, like Corinth, suffered from the commercial rivalry of Athens in the western seas, and was repeatedly harassed by squadrons of Athenian ships.
www.omnipelagos.com /entry?n=sicyon   (611 words)

  
 Cleisthenes of Sicyon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Cleisthenes (also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was the tyrant of Sicyon, who aided in the war against Cirra that destroyed that city in 595 BC.
Because Hippocleides made a fool of himself by dancing drunkenly in front of Cleisthenes, Megacles was chosen to marry Agariste.
A relative of Cleisthenes was the later Cleisthenes of Athens and Agariste, the mother of Pericles.
www.tocatch.info /en/Cleisthenes_of_Sicyon.htm   (162 words)

  
 Cleisthenes - Search Results - MSN Encarta
A grandson of Cleisthenes of Sicyon on his mother's...
Cleisthenes (also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was a noble Athenian of the accursed Alcmaeonid family.
Credited with having established democracy in Athens, Cleisthenes' reforms at the end of the 6th Century BC made possible the Golden Age of Athenian civilization that would follow in the 5th Century...
ca.encarta.msn.com /Cleisthenes.html   (119 words)

  
 Greek Theater
I must not omit to explain that [the tyrant] Cleisthenes picked on Melanippus as the person to introduce into Sicyon, because he was a bitter enemy of Adrastus, having killed both Mecistes, his brother, and Tydeus his son-in-law.
The people of Sicyon had always regarded Adrastus with great reverence, because the country had once belonged to Polybus, his maternal grandfather, who died without an heir and bequeathed the kingdom to him.
Cleisthenes, however, changed this: he transferred the choruses to Dionysus, and the rest of the ceremonial to Melanippus.
academic.reed.edu /humanities/110Tech/Theater.html   (3005 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Cleisthenes of Sicyon
Cleisthenes (also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was the tyrant of Sicyon, who aided in the First Sacred War against Kirrha that destroyed that city in 595 BC.
Because Hippocleides made a fool of himself by dancing drunkenly in front of Cleisthenes, Megacles was chosen to marry Agariste.
A relative of Cleisthenes was the later Cleisthenes of Athens and Agariste, the mother of Pericles.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Cleisthenes_of_Sicyon   (290 words)

  
 HSC Online
Cleisthenes of Sicyon: The rule of the Dorian nobility was harsh.
Cleisthenes of Sicyon became the champion of the pre-Dorians against the Dorian nobles.
Cleisthenes himself belonged to the non-Dorian family of Orthagoras and, with the support of the Ionian section of the inhabitants, he became tyrant.
hsc.csu.edu.au /ancient_history/historical_periods/greece/greek_world/Tyranny.htm   (3762 words)

  
 Informat.io on Cleisthenes
After the collapse of the Pisistratus tyranny; Isagoras and Cleisthenes were in rivalry for power, but Isagoras won the upper hand by appealed to the Spartan king Cleomenes I to help him expel Cleisthenes.
Consequently, Cleisthenes left Athens as an exile, and Isagoras was singly unrivalled in power inside the city.
Hence Isagoras and his supporters were forced to flee to the Acropolis, and were besieged there for two days, until on the third, where they fleed and were banished.Cleisthenes was subsequently recalled, along with the hundreds of exiles, and he assumed leadership of Athens.
www.informat.io /?title=cleisthenes-1   (637 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Cleisthenes
Cleisthenes (Greek: Κλεισθένης, also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was a noble Athenian of the accursed Alcmaeonid family.
With help from the Alcmaeonidae (Cleisthenes' genos, "clan"), he was responsible for overthrowing Hippias, the tyrant son of Pisistratus.
After the collapse of Hippias' tyranny, Isagoras and Cleisthenes were rivals for power, but Isagoras won the upper hand by appealing to the Spartan king Cleomenes I to help him expel Cleisthenes.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Cleisthenes   (651 words)

  
 Cleisthenes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Cleisthenes (also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was a noble Athenian of the accursed Alcmeonidate family.
With help from the Alcmaeonidae (Cleisthenes' genos, "clan") and the Spartans, he was responsible for overthrowing Hippias, the son of the tyrant Pisistratus.
Consequently, Cleisthenes left Athens as an exile, and Isagoras was singly unrivalled in power inside the city, and attempted to establish an oligarchy.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http://articles.gourt.com/%22http%3A%2F%2Farticles.gourt.com%2F%3Farticle%3DCleisthenes   (629 words)

  
 SICYON, or SECYON (the latter being the older form used by the natives) - Encyclopedia Britannica - SICYON, or SECYON ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
SICYON, or SECYON (the latter being the older form used by the natives) - Encyclopedia Britannica - SICYON, or SECYON (the latter being the older form used by the natives) - JCSM's Study Center
It was built on a low triangular plateau about 2 M. from the Corinthian Gulf, at the confluence of the Asopus and the Helisson, whose sunken beds protected it on E. and W. Between the city and its port lay a fertile plain with olive-groves and orchards.
In Sicyon also the art of painting was supposed to have been " invented." After the fall of the tyrants their institutions survived till the end of the 6th century, when the Dorian supremacy was re-established, perhaps by the agency of Sparta, and the city was enrolled in the Peloponnesian League.
www.jcsm.org /StudyCenter/Encyclopedia_Britannica/SHA_SIV/SICYON_or_SECYON_the_latter_be.html   (1145 words)

  
 Cleisthenes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Cleisthenes was a noble Athenian of the accursed Alcmeonidate family.
After the collapse of the Pisistratid tyranny, Isagoras and Cleisthenes were in rivalry for power, but Isagoras won the upper hand by becoming archon in 507/8.
Cleisthenes was subsequently recalled, along with the hundreds of exiles, and he assumed leadership of Athens.
www.ancientworlds.net /1010   (605 words)

  
 Hippocleides   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
This famous remark relates to an event at the court of Cleisthenes, tyrant of Sicyon, in 575 BC.
Cleisthenes was desirous of marrying his comely daughter Agarista well, and had his eyes on two suitors of promininent Athenian families, Megacles (an Alcmaeonid) and Hippocleides.
He danced on a table, which was rather showy anyway, but he was finally so indelicate as to dance with his head on the table and his legs gyrating in the air.
www.du.edu /~etuttle/classics/hippokl.htm   (500 words)

  
 The Alcmaeonidae or Alcmaeonids were a powerful noble family of ancient...
Nevertheless their reputation remained high, and Megacles was able to marry Agarista, the daughter of Cleisthenes Cleisthenes of Sicyon Sicyon, from whom the Athenian reformer also named Cleisthenes was descended.
This Cleisthenes overthrew Hippias Hippias, the son and successor of Pisistratus, in 508 BC 508 BC.
Cleisthenes was, at first, opposed by some who felt the curse made the Alcmaeonidae ineligible to rule; the Spartan king Cleomenes I Cleomenes I even turned against Cleisthenes and the latter was briefly exiled once more.
www.biodatabase.de /Alkmaeonidai   (455 words)

  
 Cleisthenes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
After this victory Cleisthenes began to reform the government of Athens.
The bills proposed could be rejected, passed or returned for amendments by the assembly.
The initial trend was to vote for a citizen deemed a threat to the democracy e.g.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cleisthenes   (644 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Apelles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
He is thought to have studied under Ephorus of Ephesus and under Pamphilus of Amphipolis at Sicyon.
Sicyon was founded by Argos and attained its greatest power under the tyrant Cleisthenes in the 6th cent.
BC Under the leadership of the general Aratus, Sicyon joined (3d cent.
www.encyclopedia.com /articles/00619.html   (298 words)

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