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Topic: Clement XII


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  Clement XI - LoveToKnow 1911
Clement reaffirmed the infallibility of the pope, in matters of fact (1705), and, in 1713, issued the bull Unigenitus, condemning ioi Jansenistic propositions extracted from the Moral Reflections of Pasquier Quesnel.
Clement also forbade the practice of the Jesuit missionaries in China of "accommodating" their teachings to pagan notions or customs, in order to win converts.
Clement was a polished writer, and a generous patron of art and letters.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Clement_XI   (327 words)

  
 Pope Clement XIII - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pope Clement XIII (Venice, March 7, 1693 – February 2, 1769 in Rome), born Carlo della Torre Rezzonico, was Pope from 6 July 1758 to 2 February 1769.
Clement XIII warmly espoused the order in a papal bull Apostolicum pascendi, January 7, 1765, which dismissed criticisms of the Jesuits as calumnies and praised the order's usefulness; it was largely ignored: by 1768 the Jesuits had been expelled from France, the Two Sicilies and Parma.
Driven to extremes, Clement XIII consented to call a consistory to consider the step, but on the very eve of the day set for its meeting he died (February 2, 1769), not without suspicion of poison, of which, however, there appears to be no conclusive evidence.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pope_Clement_XIII   (754 words)

  
 Pope Clement XII - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Soon it poured into Clement XII's treasury an annual sum amounting to nearly a half million scudi, enabling him to undertake the extensive building programs for which he is chiefly remembered, but which he was never able to see.
A competition for the majestic façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, perhaps more palatial than ecclesiastic, was won by architect Alessandro Galilei (finished in 1735), and Clement XII erected in that ancient basilica a magnificent chapel dedicated to his 14th century kinsman, St. Andrea Corsini.
Pope Clement XII's tomb is in the Basilica of St. John Lateran.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pope_Clement_XII   (946 words)

  
 Biography – Pope Clement XII – The Papal Library
Clement XII, after some exertion, induced the Benedictines of Saint Maur, in France, so celebrated for the works of great learning that they have published, and who till then had opposed the bull Unigenitus of Clement XI, to receive the formulary in their chapter celebrated in the month of September of that year.
Clement, according to their own wishes, sent to them, in quality of ablegate, the prelate Assemani, who was born in that country, and is known by his vast knowledge and by his learned works.
Clement was of ordinary stature and robust temperament; his features were noble, and the expression of his countenance was agreeable and prepossessing; his complexion was ruddy; his eyes blue, his nose aquiline, and his upper lip prominent.
www.saint-mike.org /Library/Papal_Library/ClementXII/Biography.html   (6249 words)

  
 Pope Clement VII   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Clement VII né Giulio di Giuliano de' Medici (1478 - September 25 1534) was pope from 1523 to 1534.
This policy in was sound and patriotic but Clement's zeal cooled; by his want of foresight and economy he laid himself open to an from the turbulent Roman barons which obliged to invoke the mediation of the Emperor.
Rome was assaulted and sacked on May 6 1527 and Clement who had displayed no resolution in his military than in his conduct was shortly afterwards obliged to surrender together with the castle of Sant' Angelo where he had taken refuge.
www.freeglossary.com /Pope_Clement_VII   (690 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Pope St. Clement I
Pope Clement I (called CLEMENS ROMANUS to distinguish him from the Alexandrian), is the first of the successors of St. Peter of whom anything definite is known, and he is the first of the "Apostolic Fathers".
The church of St. Clement at Rome lies in the valley between the Esquiline and Coelian hills, on the direct road from the Coliseum to the Lateran.
Clement uses the Old Testament affirmation "The Lord liveth", substituting the Trinity thus: "As God liveth, and the Lord Jesus Christ liveth and the Holy Spirit -- the faith and hope of the elect, so surely he that performeth", etc. (58).
www.newadvent.org /cathen/04012c.htm   (4851 words)

  
 Pope Clement XII
He had thus held with universal applause all the important offices of the Roman Court, and it is not surprising that his elevation to the papacy filled the Romans with joy.
In token of gratitude to his benefactor, Clement XI, and as a pledge that he would make that great pontiff his model, he assumed the title of Clement XII.
Clement surrounded himself with capable officials, and won the affection of his subjects by lightening their burdens, encouraging manufacture and the arts, and infusing a modern spirit into the laws relating to commerce.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/c/clement_xii,pope.html   (1320 words)

  
 Pope Clement XII - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Clement XII, born as Lorenzo Corsini (Florence, April 7, 1652 – Rome, February 6, 1740), (pope 1730-1740), had been an aristocratic lawyer and financial manager under preceding pontiffs.
He is known for building the new façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterno and beginning the Trevi Fountain and the purchase of Cardinal Albani's collection of antiquities for the papal gallery.
Clement demanded restitution from the ministers who had abused the confidence of his predecessor.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Pope_Clement_XII   (870 words)

  
 A Great Maecenas - Clemens XII
Clemens XII reintroduced the lotto (banished by his predecessor) and its revenue was used to finance a series of new projects, the main one being the new façade of S.
Statues to Clemens XII were erected in Ravenna and Ancona, but the coat of arms of the pope was not spared by the Revolution.
Clemens XII enlarged the collection of antique statues in the Capitoline Museums which were for the first time opened to the public.
members.tripod.com /romeartlover/ClemeXII.html   (735 words)

  
 [No title]
Clement has been identified with the Clement mentioned by St. Paul in his Epistle to the Philippians; but that Clement seems to have been a Philippian.
Modern scholars think that St. Clement was a freedman or the son of a freedman of the imperial household.
Clement was exiled by the Emperor Trajan to the Chersonese, modern Crimea.
www.ewtn.com /library/CHRIST/POPES.TXT   (22289 words)

  
 Pope Clement I
He is called the patron "saint of mariners" due to a story starting in the 6th century, where the Emperor Trajanus (98-117) sentenced Clement to hard labour in Crimea, and martyred there by being tied to an anchor and thrown into the sea.
In his letter, Clement I argues for a strict order of church authority, where the members are to obey church leaders by "submitting the neck", and those who refuse, are against God.
The letter isn't signed by Clement I, but rather is written in plural, addressed from the Church at Rome to the Church at Corinth, and appears to be instructing, or warning the Church at Corinth to follow the doctrines as outlined by the Church at Rome.
www.archelaos.com /popes/details.aspx?id=4   (562 words)

  
 Pope Clement XII
Clement XII, given name Lorenzo Corsini, Roman Catholic Pope from 1730 to 1740, succeeded Pope Benedict XIII on the 12th of July 1730, at the age of seventy-eight.
Yet Clement entertained high hopes for Catholicism; he labored for a union with the Greek Church, and was ready to facilitate the return of the Protestants of Saxony.
He deserves well of posterity for his services to learning and art; the restoration of the Arch of Constantine; the enrichment of the Capitoline museum with antique marbles and inscriptions, and of the Vatican library with oriental manuscripts; and the embellishment of the city with many buildings.
www.nndb.com /people/216/000094931   (175 words)

  
 Popes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Under Clement XII the government of the Papal States improved, though some may object to his use of the lottery as a painless way of raising money.
Clement continued to insist on Jansenist submission to the bull "Unigerlitus," and he had the satisfaction of receiving the submission of a group of French monks.
Clement XII, learning that this was unjust, restored its liberty to the mountain republic.
www.wga.hu /database/glossary/popes/clemen12.html   (492 words)

  
 The Definitive Guide to Pope Leo XII XXXX   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Pope Leo XII (August 22, 1760 – February 10, 1829), born Annibale Francesco Clemente Melchiore Girolamo Nicola della Genga, was Pope from 1823 to 1829.
Personally most frugal, Leo XII reduced taxes, made justice less costly, and was able to find money for certain public improvements; yet he left the finances more confused than he had found them, and even the elaborate jubilee of 1825 did not really mend matters.
Leo XII, temperamentally stern, and hard-working in spite of bodily infirmity, died at Rome on February 10, 1829.
www.xxxx.com /s/Pope_Leo_XII   (670 words)

  
 Pope Clement XIII: Proceedings of the Conclave that led to his election.
Clement XI Innocent XIII Benedict XIII Clement XII Benedict XIV Clement XIII Clement XIV Pius VI
All this was done with the utmost promptitude and discretion, for it was most necessary that Rezzonico should be elected as soon as his name had been proposed, so as to obviate the possibility of a veto being obtained against him as it had been against Cavalchini.
Clement issued bull upon bull excommunicating all those responsible for the exodus, but that helped in no way to solve the problem of how to feed, house and occupy these hordes of clerics.
www.pickle-publishing.com /papers/triple-crown-clement-xiii.htm   (2730 words)

  
 Pope Clement XII: Proceedings of the Conclave that led to his election.
Clement, notwithstanding these slights, made friendly advances to Philip V, bestowing on his third son Don Luis, aged barely eight years old, the cardinal's hat together with the archbishoprics of Seville and Toledo; but he received scant thanks for his affability, the [p.
Just before Clement died, however, his nephews, who felt uncertain as to what might fall to their lot under the next pontiff if such a precedent was allowed, prevailed on the Pope to quash the verdict and sign a decree of rehabilitation which gave Coscia his freedom.
But during Clement's pontificate a new menace known as Freemasonry made its appearance; it caused the Pontiff and his successors acute anxiety, and has not ceased to this day from sapping the foundations of the Catholic Church.
www.pickle-publishing.com /papers/triple-crown-clement-xii.htm   (2136 words)

  
 Post-Reformation Popes
His Holiness Pope Clement IX died on 9 December 1669 in Rome, in the 3rd year of his pontificate, at the age of 69-years.
His Eminence Lorenzo Cardinal Corsini dei marchesi di Sismano, Cardinal Bishop of Frascati, Prefect of the Tribunal of the Apostolic Signature of Justice, was elected Bishop of Rome on 12 July 1730 in the Vatican Apostolic Palace, taking the name Clement XII, and was crowned on 16 July, at the age of 78-years.
His Holiness Pope Clement XII died on 6 February 1740 in Rome, in the 10th year of his pontificate, at the age of 87-years.
www.ghg.net /shetler/popes/postreform.html   (1232 words)

  
 The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Additions
Biographies of the cardinals created by Clement XII (1730-1740) in the consistories of December 20, 1737 (X), June 23, 1738 (XI), December 19, 1738 (XII), February 23, 1739 (XIII), July 15, 1739 (XIV), and September 30, 1739 (XV).
Biographies of the cardinals created by Pope Clement XII (1730-1740) in the consistories of October 1, 1732 (IV), March 2, 1733 (V), and September 28, 1733 (VI).
Biographies of the cardinals created by Pope Clement XII (1730-1740) in the consistories of August 14, 1730 (I), October 2, 1730 (II), and September 24, 1731 (III).
www.fiu.edu /~mirandas/additions-02.htm   (4582 words)

  
 Pope's Photo Gallery (201-264)
238 - CLEMENT IX Born in Pistoia, he was elected on the 26th June 1667 and died on the 9th December 1669.
Louis XIV renounced the "Galliean Proposals" and the Pope recognised the bishops nominated by the King.
243 - CLEMENT XI Born in Urbino, he was elected on the 8th December 1700 and died on the 19th March 1721.
members.tripod.com /~cckswong/pope201_264.htm   (3732 words)

  
 Notre Dame Archives: ANO 1790/08/17
Because of the expensive war with the Mohammendans, Philip V of Spain has asked for a subsidy to be levied on the income of the churches in his territory.
Clement grants him six percent of the income of all religious organizations in the West Indies until the sum of two million ducats is raised.
Reiterates the stipulations of Clement XI, in the brief of March 8, 1721.
archives.nd.edu /mano/17900817.htm   (382 words)

  
 St Peter's - Saint Peter's by James Lees-Milne   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
It is arguable how far St Clement, to judge by his letter of admonishment to the Corinthians of A.D. 95, acknowledged the primacy of St Peter over St Paul when he bracketed them together.
I have already pointed out that the tone of Clement's famous letter to the Corinthians was throughout that of a superior directing his subordinates in a distant part of the Mediterranean.
When, ten or eleven years after Clement's Epistle, another was sitting on his throne, St Ignatius during his slow journey to martyrdom addressed the Roman Church as 'president of the brotherhood of the faithful'.
www.stpetersbasilica.org /Docs/JLM/SaintPeters-1.htm   (6587 words)

  
 Pope Leo XII
He forbid vaccination against smallpox during an epidemic, stating that it was 'against the natural law'.
Leo XII continued a policy of enforcing Jews into ghettos within Rome, some areas surrounded by high walls.
Leo XII's rule was described as a tyranny, running the Papal States as a police regime.
www.archelaos.com /popes/details.aspx?id=291   (117 words)

  
 Caritas - Papal Office - January 2004
After praising all the Popes from Pope Clement XII to Pope Pius XII, Paul Fisher pours out his gusts on the Vatican II bogus (a fact not known to him) Popes.
Pope Leo XII does a great service in that he publishes as part of his encyclical, the encyclicals condemning Freemasonry by (1) Pope Clement XII (April 28, 1738) the first encyclical condemning Freemasonry, (2) then by Pope Benedict XIV (March 18, 1751), and (3) then by Pope Pius VII (September 13, 1821).
From the first condemnation of Freemasonry by Clement XII in 1738 all the Popes have had to condemn Freemasonry in one form or another.
www.truecatholic.org /pope/car-200401.htm   (2460 words)

  
 CLEMENT XII - Online Information article about CLEMENT XII
CLEMENT XII - Online Information article about CLEMENT XII
Yet Clement entertained high hopes for Catholicism; he laboured for a See also:
UNION (known locally as Union Hill and officially as Town of Union)
encyclopedia.jrank.org /CHR_CLI/CLEMENT_XII.html   (296 words)

  
 The Papal Autograph Collection An inventory of the Papal Autograph Collection at The American Catholic History Research ...
In the eighteenth century, France pressured Clement XIII and Clement XIV to suppress the Jesuits by severing diplomatic relations and occupying Avignon (then papal territory).
Popes Leo XII (Annibale Sermattei Della Genga; 1823-1829), Pius VIII (Francesco Saverio Castiglioni; 1829-1830), and Gregory XVI ((Bartolomeo Alberto Cappellari; in religion Mauro Cappellari, Camaldolese friar;1831-1846), remained opposed to reform.
Portrait of Leo XII (Annibal della Genga; born 1760; elevated to papacy 1823).
libraries.cua.edu /achrcua/papalautograph.html   (2026 words)

  
 St. Peter's - The Holy Door   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Afterwards, Clement VI reduced the period to every 50 years, Urban VI to 35 and Paul II to 25.
It was closed with a rough wall until 1949, as it was framed with marbles commissioned by Gregory XII for the Jubilee of 1575, then renewed by Paul V. In 1949 the Bishop Francesco Von Streng donated the two bronze panels for the Swiss Catholics, as an ex-voto, because his land was saved from war.
It is a work of art full of quiet expressivecomposure and symmetric structure, divided into sixteen rectangular panels distributed in four orders, divided by the coat-of-arms of the thirty six Popes, who celebrated the ordinary Holy Years.
www.stpetersbasilica.org /Interior/HolyDoor/HolyDoor.htm   (934 words)

  
 ~Destroy Freemasonry~ - Pope Clement XII 1730-1740
Fifteen years later, on April 28, 1738, Pope Clement XII in his Pontifical Constitution "In Eminenti" condemned Freemasonry as being Counter-Church and Counter-State.
Failure to heed it, whether partial or general, by the Church and the State of those days, seems to us as the primordial cause of all our political and religious present day turmoil.
However, not only is the condemnation by Pope Clement XII extended to Masonic Sects, but it applies also to all the laymen who, although they are not members of Societies called Freemasonic, favor them, in any manner, thus: "We command to the faithful to abstain from intercourse with those societies.
www.destroyfreemasonry.com /chapter1.htm   (314 words)

  
 Mac-ency-R
One of the earliest attaeks—if not the first of them—directed at the Masonic Institution by the authorities of the Roman Catholic Chureh is the Bull or edict of Pope Clement XII issued in 1738 when he was eighty-six years old.
The Bull of Pope Clement XII was in due course followed by that of Pope Benedict XIV, the latter reaffirming the condemnation of the Freemasons proclaimed to the members of the Roman Catholic Church by his predecessor.
The writer in the New Age quotes Lenning's Freemason's Lexicon, to the effect that after Pope Benedict XIV confirmed the Bull of Pope Clement XII, his predecessor, against the Freemasons, one of his courtiers, a zealous Freemason, induced him to be privately initiated into the Order.
www.dancing.org /tsmr/.books/mackey/RMAP~1/Rmac-12.htm   (2679 words)

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