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Topic: Close front unrounded vowel


  
  Open back unrounded vowel - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Its vowel height is open, which means the tongue is positioned as far as possible from the roof of the mouth.
Its vowel backness is back, which means the tongue is positioned as far back as possible in the mouth without creating a constriction that would be classified as a consonant
Its vowel roundedness is unrounded, which means that the lips are not rounded.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Open_back_unrounded_vowel   (297 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Close front unrounded vowel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In phonetics, vowel height refers to the position of the tongue relative to the roof of the mouth in a vowel sound.
Cardinal vowels are obtained by dividing the "operture space" between the closest vowels [i] and [u] and the most open vowel [a] in four equal "degrees" of operture: close (high tongue position), close-mid, open-mid, and open (low tongue position).
The close front unrounded vowel is a type of vowel sound, used in some spoken language s.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Close-front-unrounded-vowel   (1541 words)

  
 Top Literature - Y   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
When not serving as the second vowel in a diphthong, it has the sound value /y/ in German and the Scandinavian languages, where it can never be a consonant (except for loanwords).
In Polish and Guaraní, it represents the close central unrounded vowel.
It is indicative of the rarity of front rounded vowels that [y] is the rarest sound represented in the IPA by a letter of the English alphabet, being cross-linguitically less than half as frequent as [q] or [c] and only about a quarter as frequent as [x].
encyclopedia.topliterature.com /?title=Y   (1019 words)

  
 Close-mid front unrounded vowel at AllExperts
The close-mid front unrounded vowel is a type of vowel sound, used in some spoken languages.
* Its vowel height is close-mid, which means the tongue is positioned halfway between close vowel and a mid vowel.
Many languages, such as Spanish, Japanese, Korean, and Turkish, have a mid front unrounded vowel, which to speakers is clearly distinct from both the close-mid and open-mid vowels.
en.allexperts.com /e/c/cl/close-mid_front_unrounded_vowel.htm   (334 words)

  
 vowel
The actual lip posture for vowels in any particular language may be similar to that of the closest cardinal vowel with the same lip posture feature, but often speakers of many languages adopt a more neutral posture than would be indicated by these cardinal vowels.
There is a tendency for front vowels to be less rounded than back vowels in the absence of a rounding contrast (although there are exceptions to this tendency).
On the other hand, the a vowel could not be much more close than the “standard” close vowels (first degree of aperture) and still be vocalic, rather than some kind of spirant or fricative consonant, depending on the degree of muscular tension.
www.tuninst.net /UKT/Phonetics-UNIL/text/vowel.htm   (2024 words)

  
 The Ultimate California English - American History Information Guide and Reference   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Front vowels are raised before velar nasal, so that the near-open front unrounded vowel /æ/ and the near-close near-front unrounded vowel /ɪ/ are raised to a close-mid front unrounded vowel [e] and a close front unrounded vowel [i] before[ŋ].
The vowels in words such as Mary, marry, merry are merged to the open-mid front unrounded vowel [ɛ]
As with many vowel shifts, these significant changes occurring in the spoken language are rarely noticed by average speakers; imitation of peers and other sociolinguistic phenomena play a large part in determining the extent of the vowel shift in a particular speaker.
www.historymania.com /american_history/California_English   (1336 words)

  
 Close_vowel LANGUAGE SCHOOL EXPLORER
A close vowel is a type of vowel sound used in many spoken languages.
The defining characteristic of a close vowel is that the tongue is positioned as close as possible to the roof of the mouth without creating a constriction that would be classified as a consonant.
Close vowels are often referred to as high vowels, as in the Americanist phonetic tradition, because the tongue is positioned high in the mouth during the articulation of a close vowel.
www.school-explorer.com /info/Close_vowel   (149 words)

  
 Near-close Near-front Unrounded Vowel Encyclopedia Article, Description, History and Biography @ OurLocalColor.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The near-close near-front unrounded vowel is a type of vowel sound, used in some spoken languages.
Its vowel height is near-close, which means the tongue is positioned similarly to a close vowel, but slightly less constricted.
Its vowel backness is near-front, which means the tongue is positioned as in a front vowel, but slightly further back in the mouth.
www.ourlocalcolor.com /encyclopedia/Near-close_near-front_unrounded_vowel   (330 words)

  
 Greek pronunciation
Vowels When a word ending an a vowel is followed by a word beginning with a vowel, one of the vowels is removed.
Vowels have the 'pecking order' u o a e i (u is highest), and the vowel that is removed is the one that is lower in the pecking order.
Close: a vowel where the tense part of the tongue is near to the roof of the mouth.
www.derek.co.uk /language/greek-pr.htm   (1425 words)

  
 English language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
During the 15th century, Middle English was transformed by the Great Vowel Shift, the spread of a standardised London-based dialect in government and administration, and the standardising effect of printing.
Vowel length plays a phonetic role in the majority of English dialects, and is said to be phonemic in a few dialects, such as Australian English and New Zealand English.
In certain dialects of the modern English language, for instance General American, there is allophonic vowel length: vowel phonemes are realized as long vowel allophones before voiced consonant phonemes in the coda of a syllable.
www.daveproxy.co.uk /cgi-bin/nph-proxy.cgi/010110A/687474703a2f2f656e2e77696b6970656469612e6f72672f77696b692f456e676c6973685f6c616e6775616765   (3331 words)

  
 Linguistique UNIL - The notion of semi-vowel
There is a large degree of freedom in the articulation of open vowels and it is certainly possible to imagine vowels even more open than [a], for example (although such vowels would probably not be phonologically distinct from the "standard" open vowels of the fourth degree of aperture.
Additionally, the close vowels must have a certain minimum duration in order to be perceived as vocalic rather than consonantal (fricative or spirant).
This sound is produced by articulating a very close unrounded front "vowel" (a close [i]), but without vibration of the vocal cords.
www.unil.ch /ling/page24569.html   (314 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Close front unrounded vowel
The close front unrounded vowel is a type of vowel sound, used in many spoken languages.
Its vowel height is close, which means the tongue is positioned as close as possible to the roof of the mouth without creating a constriction that would be classified as a consonant.
Its vowel roundedness is unrounded, which means that the lips are spread.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Close_front_unrounded_vowel   (182 words)

  
 List of phonetics topics
\n*labialization\n*labial-palatal approximant\n*labial-palatal consonant\n*labial-velar approximant\n*labial-velar consonant\n*labiodental approximant\n*labiodental consonant\n*labiodental nasal\n*laminal consonant\n*lateral alveolar approximant\n*lateral alveolar click\n*lateral alveolar flap\n*lateral consonant\n*lateral palatal approximant\n*lateral retroflex approximant\n*lateral velar approximant\n*lateral voiced alveolar fricative\n*lateral voiceless alveolar fricative\n*length (phonetics)\n*linguolabial consonant\n*lips\n*list of consonants\n*list of vowels
\n*nasal consonant\n*nasal vowel\n*nasalization\n*near-back vowel\n*near-close near-back rounded vowel (ʊ)\n*near-close near-front rounded vowel (ʏ)\n*near-close near-front unrounded vowel (ɪ)\n*near-close vowel\n*near-front vowel\n*near-open central vowel (ɐ)\n*near-open front unrounded vowel (æ)\n*near-open vowel
\n*open back rounded vowel (ɒ)\n*open back unrounded vowel (ɑ) \n*open front rounded vowel (ɶ)\n*open front unrounded vowel (a) \n*open vowel\n*open-mid back rounded vowel (ɔ)\n*open-mid back unrounded vowel (ʌ) \n*open-mid central rounded vowel (ɞ)\n*open-mid central unrounded vowel (ɜ)\n*open-mid front rounded vowel (œ)\n*open-mid front unrounded vowel (ɛ)\n*open-mid vowel\n*oral consonant
encyclopedia.codeboy.net /wikipedia/l/li/list_of_phonetics_topics.html   (187 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Close front unrounded vowel
The close front unrounded vowel is a type of vowel sound, used in some spoken languages.
Its vowel backness is front, which means the tongue is positioned as far forward as possible in the mouth without creating a constriction that would be classified as a consonant.
The vowel [i] is a very common vowel, as it occurs in most languages—even languages that have only three vowels almost always include [i].
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Close_front_unrounded_vowel   (321 words)

  
 [No title]
The sound of a vowel is determined by three factors: whether or not the lips are rounded, the shape of the tongue, and the position of the tongue.
A 'close' vowel is one where the hump of the tongue is held high in the mouth, and an 'open' vowel is one where the hump of the tongue is held low in the mouth.
The ninth vowel, the one in the middle of the chart, is made by tensing the middle of the tongue and positioning it exactly half-way between the roof and the floor of the mouth.
www.poptel.org.uk /derek/vowels.htm   (2042 words)

  
 The Tengwar for Esperanto
Vowels may be represented either by "tehtar" (diacriticals or accent marks written above a preceding or following vowel) or by dedicated letters ("full-writing").
The close front unrounded vowel of English "be".
Most of the most common morphemes are closed; especially, the most common grammatical affixes (-et-, -ig-, -igh-, -ec-, -em-), and the commonest verb inflections (-as, -is, -os) are closed.
www.catb.org /~esr/tengwar/esperanto-tengwar.html   (1836 words)

  
 California_English - The definative answer from Alt & Ego   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Front vowels are raised before velar nasal [?], so that the near-open front unrounded vowel /ć/ and the near-close near-front unrounded vowel /?/ are raised to a close-mid front unrounded vowel [e] and a close front unrounded vowel [i] before [?].
Much like other vowel shifts occurring in North America such as the Southern Vowel Shift, Northern Cities Vowel Shift, and the Canadian Shift the California Vowel Shift is noted for a systematic chain shift of several vowels.
Unlike some of the other vowel shifts, however, the California Vowel Shift is generally considered to be in earlier stages of development as compared to the more widespread Northern and Southern Vowel Shifts, although the new vowel characteristics of the California Vowel Shift are increasingly found among younger speakers.
www.altandego.com /wiki.asp?k=California_English   (2671 words)

  
 Vowel - ikiW
In phonetics, a vowel is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by an open configuration of the vocal tract so that there is no build-up of air pressure above the glottis.
A vowel is also understood to be syllabic: an equivalent open but non-syllabic sound is called a semivowel.
In all languages, vowels form the nucleus or peak of syllables, whereas consonants form the onset and (in languages which have them) coda.
ikiw.net /en/Vowel   (229 words)

  
 english language - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
After Scots and Frisian, the next closest relative is the modern Low Saxon language of the eastern Netherlands and northern Germany.
Seaspeak and the related Airspeak and Policespeak, all based on restricted vocabularies, were designed by Edward Johnson in the 1980s to aid international cooperation and communication in specific areas.
The North American variation of this sound is a rhotic vowel.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/english-language   (2836 words)

  
 Davanagari - duno.com reference
All the vowels in Devanāgarī are attached to the top or bottom of the consonant or to an vowel sign attached to the right of the consonant, with the exception of the vowel sign, which is attached on the left.
Otherwise in Standard Hindi, ऐ (ai) is long near-open front unrounded vowel: /æ/ as a in cat; औ (au) is long open-mid back rounded vowel: /ɔː/ as au in caught.
In modern Sanskrit pronunciation, the vowel "ṛ" is sometimes realised as /ri/ or /ru/, although many people (especially if their native language retains the original Sanskrit sounds, as is the case in Malayalam) do make the /r/ sound.
www.duno.com /term/davanagari   (3560 words)

  
 I
In Semitic, the letter Yôdh was probably originally a pictogram for an arm with hand, derived from a similar hieroglyph that had the value of /ˁ/ in Egyptian, but was reassigned to /j/ (pronounced as English Y in "yoke") by Semites, because their word for "arm" began with that sound.
It stood for the vowel /i/, the same as in the Old Italic alphabet.
The modern letter J was originally a variation of this letter, and both were interchangeably used for both the vowel and the consonant, only coming to be differentiated in the 16th century.
www.reboom.com /article/I.html   (656 words)

  
 How to pronounce Hebrew
The pronounciation is based on several logical principles and not on historical research, but it turns out (with one exception) to be very close to scholars' reconstruction of the accent used by the Tiberian Baalei Hamesorah.
The close relation of samekh and shin is clear from the book of Judges, in any case.
Further, there are no "full" vs. "incomplete" versions of vowels caused by the insertion of yod or waw, since those letters are simply matres lectiones, inserted to indicate (pretty much) what vowel is there.
ir.iit.edu /~argamon/hebrew.html   (704 words)

  
 RP is the accent with the most phonemes? (page 3) | Antimoon Forum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
[I] is the lax close front unrounded vowel and
In RP and GA (Tom's) /ei/ (the vowel in "mate") is pronounced as (Kirshenbaum's) [eI].
The vowel in "gate" and "ray" MUST be pronounced as a diphthong in Australian English and it must thus be transcribed as two (or possibly more) symbols if you're using the IPA (but not if you're using the ITA).
www.antimoon.com /forum/2004/5564-3.htm   (1360 words)

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