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Topic: Clotted cream


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  Clotted Cream
The most famous of all is 'Clotted Cream' which achieves its thick clotted texture by heating cream of high-fat breed cows, such as the Jersey type, in pans, traditionally made of copper but latterly stainless steel, to about 190°f and allowing it to cool slowly.
In the farmhouses, the pans were heated crudely over a fire or stove and the cream was rich in acid and aroma-producing bacteria.
The cream is usually packed in shallow trays a few inches deep and forms a yellow crusty surface.
www.britishdelights.com /cream.htm   (204 words)

  
  Cream Teas
A cream tea cannot be considered as such unless there is cream and the type of cream that should be used is clotted cream.
Originally, clotted cream was only produced in the Westcountry - this is where the rich soil, mild climate and the right breed of cattle came together to create milk with a high enough cream content to produce clotted cream.
Clotted cream has a consistency similar to soft butter and can be used as a replacement for butter in such things as toffees.
www.broadwayhouse.com /creamtea.html   (1668 words)

  
  Clotted cream
Clotted cream, also called Devon cream, is a speciality of the counties of Devonshire, Somerset and Cornwall in southwestern England.
Clotted cream is produced by gently heating unhomogenized milk and skimming off the thick yellow, wrinkled cream forming on the top.
Clotted cream may be served with scones, fresh fruit or jams and with apple, fruit or mince pies, muffins, cakes, trifles, meringues, pancakes and waffles.
www.dlc.fi /~marianna/gourmet/devon.htm   (179 words)

  
  Clotted cream   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Clotted cream, also called Devon cream, is a speciality of the counties of Devonshire, Somerset and Cornwall in southwestern England.
Clotted cream is produced by gently heating unhomogenized milk and skimming off the thick yellow, wrinkled cream forming on the top.
Clotted cream may be served with scones, fresh fruit or jams and with apple, fruit or mince pies, muffins, cakes, trifles, meringues, pancakes and waffles.
www.saunalahti.fi /~marian1/gourmet/devon.htm   (179 words)

  
 Cream - Joyofbaking.com
Double (rich) Cream has a 48% butterfat content and can be whipped and is also used in pies and sauces.
Clotted Cream (Devonshire or Devon Cream) is a thick, rich, yellowish cream with a scalded or cooked flavor that is made by heating unpasteurized milk until a thick layer of cream sits on top.
Clotted cream is produced commercially in Devon, Cornwall, and Somerset England.
joyofbaking.com /Cream.html   (791 words)

  
 All Cheese Considered: Clotted Cream
Clotted cream, sometimes called Devon Cream, is not technically a cheese but rather a cooked dairy product that is transformed by the process into a more stable entity than the original cream that keeps much longer.
The tradition of clotted cream began at least 600 years ago in the southwestern corner of England in the counties of Cornwall (where it is registered with the European Union as a Protected Designation of Origin) and Devon.
Clotted cream is derived from the unusually rich milk from the area around Devon and Cornwall.
www.gourmetretailer.com /gourmetretailer/magazine/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1962407   (666 words)

  
 Cooks Recipes | Clotted Cream Recipe
This specialty of Devonshire, England (which is why it's also known as Devonshire or Devon cream) is traditionally made by gently heating rich, unpasteurized milk until a semisolid layer of cream forms on the surface.
Clotted cream can be spread on bread or spooned atop fresh fruit or desserts.
The traditional English "cream tea" consists of clotted cream and jam served with scones and tea.
www.cooksrecipes.com /sauce/clotted-cream-recipe.html   (138 words)

  
 Clotted Cream
Clotted Cream is ideally suited for blending with brandy and liqueurs.
Clotted Cream with Grand Marnier is the decadent choice to serve with fresh strawberries, or on pancakes, crepes and croissants.
Clotted Cream with Drambuie is unmistakably aromatic and warming; wonderful on traditional Christmas fare such as mince pies and plum puddings, or for topping a festive trifle.
www.efoodexpert.com /food_news/clotted_cream_p2.htm   (548 words)

  
 Questions and Answers - Crème Fraiche vs. Clotted Cream vs. Devonshire Cream
The cream would then become much thicker and develop a golden crust, which is similar to butter.
Today however, the cream is extracted by a separator, which extracts the cream as it is pumped from the dairy to the holding tank.
The separator is a type of centrifuge, which extracts the surplus cream at the correct quantity so that the milk will still have enough cream to be classified as milk.
whatscookingamerica.net /Q-A/CremeFraiche2.htm   (410 words)

  
 New Window - Waitrose.com - Glossary Term - Cream
Clotted cream is the thickest and richest type of cream available and is traditionally made in Devon or Cornwall.
This is fresh cream which is treated with a bacteria culture that thickens it and gives it a slightly sour taste.
Organic thick cream is made from milk produced on farms practising organic farming methods to Soil Association standards.
www.waitrose.com /frontend/popups/rec_gloss.asp?uidstr=117   (1115 words)

  
 Home Manufacturing   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
This specialty of Devonshire, England (which is why it's also known as Devonshireor Devon cream) is made by gently heating rich, unpasteurized milk until a semisolid layer of cream forms on the surface.
Clotted cream can be refrigerated, tightly covered, for up to 4 days.
Whisk in the sour cream and sugar; continuing to beat until the mixture is very thick.
drinc.ucdavis.edu /hman2.htm   (358 words)

  
 Clotted cream   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Clotted cream is a treacle -thick yellow cream made by heating and then leaving unhomogenised cow's milk out in shallow pans overnight.
Clotted cream is a required ingredient of a cream tea, which is indeed known outside the United Kingdom as a Devonshire Tea.
A snack consisting of ice cream (1) in a wafer cone.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Clotted_cream.html   (763 words)

  
 Cook's Thesaurus: Milk & Cream
Light whipping cream = whipping cream (with a butterfat content of 30 - 36%) and heavy cream = heavy whipping cream (with at least 36% fat) are heavy enough to whip, and aren't as prone as lower-fat creams to curdling in sauces.
Europeans go for even heavier creams, like double cream (with a butterfat content of 42%), extra-thick double cream, and clotted cream = Devonshire cream, which is often spread like butter over scones.
Cream sauces made with lower-fat cream substitutes also tend to have less body; to correct for that, consider adding 1 tablespoon flour or 2 teaspoons cornstarch to the sauce for every cup of evaporated milk substituted.
www.foodsubs.com /Dairyoth.html   (1713 words)

  
 Devonshire Cream - Joyofbaking.com
evonshire (or Devon) Cream is a clotted cream produced commercially in Devon, Cornwall, and Somerset England.
It is a thick, rich, yellowish cream with a scalded or cooked flavor that is made by heating unpasteurized milk until a thick layer of cream sits on top.
Clotted cream has 55-60 percent fat content and is so thick it does not need whipping.
www.joyofbaking.com /DevonshireCream.html   (555 words)

  
 Cream - Glossary - Hormel Foods
Clotted Cream contains a minimum of 55% fat content and is similar to Double Cream which contains at least 48% fat.
The Clotted and Double Creams are often added to savory food dishes such as Cream soups or risotto to deepen the richness of the flavors.
This type of Cream is made with the use of a natural latic acid culture that is added to create the sour and tart flavor.
www.hormel.com /kitchen/glossary.asp?id=33211&catitemid=   (760 words)

  
 Mock or Faux Devonshire Cream
Originally from Devonshire County, England, it is a thick, buttery cream often used as a topping for desserts.
It is still a specialty of Devon, Cornwall, and Somerset as this is where the right breed of cattle are raised with a high enough cream content to produce clotted cream.
Before the days of pasteurization, the milk from the cows was left to stand for several hours so that the cream would rise to the top.
whatscookingamerica.net /DevonshireCream.htm   (169 words)

  
 clotted cream - Allrecipes
This specialty of Devonshire, England (which is why it's also known as Devonshire or Devon cream) is made by gently heating rich, unpasteurized milk until a semisolid layer of cream forms on the surface.
The traditional English "cream tea" consists of clotted cream and jam served with SCONES and tea.
Clotted cream can be refrigerated, tightly covered, for up to 4 days.
allrecipes.com /HowTo/clotted-cream/Detail.aspx   (132 words)

  
 Frog Hollow Farm | Clotted Cream | Frog Hollow farm grows the sweetest and juiciest organic peaches and fruit in the ...
As to making clotted cream, in the nineteenth century, Cornish mining and farm families typically kept a shallow pan of fresh milk on a warm spot on the wood or coal burning stove that would have had a banked fire going most of the time.
The cream, after sitting in a cool place for a period first, and having now risen to the top, would thicken and form a wrinkly golden crust.
Place the bowl of milk and cream over the water and heat to about 175°F. If your stove doesn't hold a low, even temperature well, you may have to turn the heat from low to off at intervals that will hold the milk between 165°-180°F for a minimum of an hour and a half.
www.froghollow.com /kitchen/miscR1.cfm   (1497 words)

  
 Boston.com / A&E / Dining/Food
Clotted cream differs from whipped cream in both flavor and texture.
As it cooks, it develops a slightly caramel flavor and thickens to the consistency of a soft cream cheese.
Lightly brush the surface with the cream and sprinkle with the reserved sugar.
www.boston.com /dining/recipes/s/scones_with_clotted_cream_and_jam.html   (383 words)

  
 Clotted Cream vs. Double Devon
Clotted Cream has a minimum fat content of 55% while Double Devon has a minimum fat content of 48%.
Clotted cream is made by pouring milk from high-fat bred cows into shallow pans; after settling the cream rises to the top.
Clotted cream is the most widely used product for cream teas.
www.theteahousetimes.com /creams.htm   (400 words)

  
 Questions and Answers - Crème Fraiche vs. Clotted Cream vs. Devonshire Cream
It is still a specialty of Devon, Cornwall, and Somerset, as this is where the right breed of cattle is raised with a high enough cream content to produce clotted cream.
The cream would then become much thicker and develop a golden crust, which is similar to butter.
The separator is a type of centrifuge, which extracts the surplus cream at the correct quantity so that the milk will still have enough cream to be classified as milk.
www.whatscookingamerica.net /Q-A/CremeFraiche2.htm   (410 words)

  
 Cornish Clotted Cream, the cream from Cornwall
The leading Cornish Clotted Cream company in Cornwall is Rodda who do sell through most UK supermarkets.
The cream is then scalded to 70 to 80º C, but not allowed to boil, for a minimum of one hour during which time a thick crust forms.
Clotted cream has all the usual uses of whipped cream, but is much thicker and tastier.
www.cornwall-calling.co.uk /food/clotted.htm   (631 words)

  
 clotted cream definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta
clotted cream definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta
Search for "clotted cream" in all of MSN Encarta
U.K. thick cream from heated milk: a thick cream made by removing the cream from the top of heated milk
encarta.msn.com /dictionary_1861687823/clotted_cream.html   (84 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Clotted cream 6oz-pack 2 jars: Gourmet Food   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Clotted cream from the Devon creamery has a higher butter fat content than regular Devon Cream.
You make clotted cream by heating and cooling milk, allowing the cream to rise in "clots," and then skimming the clots from the top.
Clotted cream is rich and extremely dense, and spreads thicker than cream cheese.
www.amazon.com /Clotted-cream-6oz-pack-2-jars/dp/B0000TMYQY   (722 words)

  
 Clotted Cream, Devon Cream, great with scones!!
Clotted Cream 1 oz and 2 Jams 1 oz
These thick creams are absolutely delicious, and are best explained as a cross between cream and butter.
must be chosen for all clotted cream during the months of March through October to guarantee the clotted cream will arrive to you in good condition.
www.englishteastore.com /british-store-cream-tea.html   (278 words)

  
 Cornish Clotted Cream -homemade scones, with real fuit jam
No Short Break to Cornwall is complete without sampling a delicious proper Cornish Cream Tea- scones heaped in strawberry jam served with dollops of Clotted Cream.
This is the method that my grandmother, Cornish and a true Cornwall countrywomen, used to make what she called scalded cream, but which all the cookery books today seem to describe as clotted cream.
This is the method my grandmother used to make clotted cream some 40 years ago when she was still farming in Cornwall.
www.cornishlight.co.uk /cornish-clotted-cream.htm   (473 words)

  
 The Great British Kitchen
Traditionally this is made by pouring milk into shallow pans and leaving, undisturbed, for 24 hours allowing the cream to rise.
When the surface cream has developed a thick, rich, yellow wrinkled crust, Turn off the heat and allow the pans to cool slowly.
Once cold, skim the cream off and serve with scones, fruit or fruit pies.
www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk /recipes_result.asp?name=clottedcream2   (113 words)

  
 The Rich Source of Indulgence
Clotted cream is made by scalding either whole milk or fresh cream.
In winter, when the cows must eat fodder, the clotted cream is the color of hazelnuts, but when the grass in the pastures is green, the cream is yellow as a jonquil.
Lake milks her herd morning and evening, separates the cream from the milk and puts the cream into a shallow enamel pan.
www.nytimes.com /2003/06/11/dining/11DEVO.html?ex=1370664000&en=cc039111bd880151&ei=5007&partner=USERLAND   (771 words)

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