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Topic: Codified constitution


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 Constitution   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
For example, in the Constitution of Australia, most of its fundamental political principles and regulations concerning the relationship between branches of government, and concerning the government and the individual are codified in a single document, the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Australia.
Codified constitutions, unlike uncodified constitutions are the not the product of an "evolution" of laws and conventions over centuries, they are usually the product of dramatic political change, such as a revolution.
A "constitutional violation" is an action or legislative act that is judged by a constitutional court to be contary to the constitution, that is, "unconstitutional".
www.totalbike.com /wiki/Constitution   (3848 words)

  
 United States Constitution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America and is the oldest codified written national constitution still in force.
The U.S. Constitution styles itself the "supreme law of the land." Courts have interpreted this phrase to mean that when laws (including state constitutions) that have been passed by state legislatures, or by the (national) U.S. Congress, are found to conflict with the federal constitution, these laws are null and have no effect.
The Constitution of The United States has also served as a model for the constitutions of numerous other nations, including the second oldest codified constitution, the May Constitution of Poland, which was written in 1791.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/United_States_Constitution   (5255 words)

  
 Constitution - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
An example from the constitutional law of nation-states would be a provincial government in a federal state that may not have authority over banking under the federal constitution.
Countries that adopt constitutions usually do so by a process of ratification.The process by which a country adopts a constitution is closely tied to the historical and political context driving this fundamental change.
The United States Constitution of 1787 (ratified 1789), heavily influenced by the (by then considerably modified) Magna Carta, plus the writings of Polybius, Locke, Montesquieu, and others, is often considered the oldest codified constitution, and in any case remains the oldest such document still in effect.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /constitution.htm   (1512 words)

  
 CONSTITUTION FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The term ''constitution'' comes from the Latin ''constitutio'', which referred to any important law, usually issued by the emperor, and was widely used in canon_law to indicate certain relevant decisions, mainly of the pope.
However, the presence of statutes with constitutional significance, namely the Statute_of_Westminster, as adopted by the Commonwealth in the Statute_of_Westminster_Adoption_Act_1942, and the Australia_Act means that Australia's constitution is not completely contained in a single constitutional document, so it differs in codification from the Constitutution of the United States.
States such as the United Kingdom that have uncodified constitution are usually ones in which there is parliamentary_supremacy and in which the constitution can be changed by a simple statute law and in which the courts do not have the authority to strike down statutes passed by parliament and declare them to be unconstitutional.
www.amysflowershop.com /constitution   (3849 words)

  
 Constitution [Definition]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Modern codified constitutions have evolved in the 18th century(17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800....
In states using uncodified constitutions, the difference between constitution law and statuteA statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published.
A constitutional court is normally the court of last resortThe supreme court in some countries, provinces, and states, is the highest court in that jurisdiction and functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be appealed.
www.wikimirror.com /Constitution   (7344 words)

  
 Constitution -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Countries that adopt constitutions usually do so by a process of (Making something valid by formally ratifying or confirming it) ratification.The process by which a country adopts a constitution is closely tied to the historical and political context driving this fundamental change.
Possibly the most common usage of 'constitution' is to describe a single, written, fundamental law that defines how a nation or a subdivision is (The body of people who are citizens of a particular government) governed, (Law enacted by a legislative body) legislation is passed, power and authority are distributed, and how they are limited.
In these systems, the difference between a constitution and a (An act passed by a legislative body) statute is somewhat arbitrary, usually depending on the traditional devotion of popular opinion to historical principles embodied in important past legislation.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/c/co/constitution.htm   (1241 words)

  
 Constitution   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
In democratic systems, the constitution is considered a fundamental social contract among citizen s (following Rousseau's writings), where government receives its powers from the people, not the monarch or a parliament, and is bound by an express set of human rights.
This is considered the model followed by the United States Constitution, which is the oldest such document still in effect today, soon followed in Europe by Polish Constitution of the May 3rd 1791 and the French one in 1792.
Utah Constitutions A short history of the Utah Constitution, with links to text of the original Constitution, scanned images of a facsimile of that Constitution, and the text of the Constitution as currently amended.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Constitution.html   (1274 words)

  
 Constitution   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The United States Constitution of 1787 (ratified 1789), heavily influenced by the writings of Rousseau and others, is often considered the oldest codified constitution, and in any case remains the oldest such document still in effect.
However it is sometimes used incorrectly when referring to an uncodified constitution, usually in the context of a constitution where certain rights are not protected or entrenched and could be abolished by the country's law making body.
Again, to say a country has no constitution is a common mistake made by someone referring to a country that has an uncodified constitution.
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/c/co/constitution_1.html   (1002 words)

  
 Articles - Constitution   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
That is, if there is a conflict between a legal statute and the codified constitution, all or part of the statute can be declared ultra vires by a court and struck down as unconstitutional.
States such as the United Kingdom that have uncodified constitution are usually ones in which there is parliamentary supremacy and in which the constitution can be changed by a simple statute law and in which the courts do not have the authority to strike down statutes passed by parliament and declare them to be unconstitutional.
Early examples of written constitutions include Solon's constitution of Athens (594 BC) and Cleisthenes' constitution, which reformed the constitution of ancient Athens and set it on a democratic footing in 508 BC.
www.sidepoint.com /articles/Constitution   (3739 words)

  
 Iowa General Assembly - Iowa Constitution
Senators and representatives, in all cases, except treason, felony, or breach of the peace, shall be privileged from arrest during the session of the general assembly, and in going to and returning from the same.
In all cases of elections to fill vacancies in office occurring before the expiration of a full term, the person so elected shall hold for the residue of the unexpired term; and all persons appointed to fill vacancies in office, shall hold until the next general election, and until their successors are elected and qualified.
This constitution shall be the supreme law of the state, and any law inconsistent therewith, shall be void.
www.legis.state.ia.us /Constitution.html   (6635 words)

  
 Distinguish between a Codified and an Uncodified constitution.
A written constitution would allow the British people to appeal to the courts with a written document to back up their claims; a codified document is a point of reference and the public will be able to read and understand our constitution a considerable amount more than they do presently.
A written constitution could be taught in schools; this would not only increase their insight into politics but also encourage them to respect the laws included in the constitution.
An entrenched codified constitution would also be an advantage to the British Judicial system, as laws would be clearly defined so judges would be able to recognise when laws are broken, and make fairer decisions.
www.coursework.info /i/26820.html   (404 words)

  
 Right call, wrong time | Samizdata.net
So many ill-informed Brits seem to think that a constitution is something only the Americans have; an impression which is probably driven home by the fact that they so often hear Americans citing and arguing about their constitution while, here in the UK, such talk dropped off the radar of debate years ago.
Any constitution that is carved out under the current hegemonic ideology is highly likely to greatly resemble the kind of monstrosity that the European Union is currently trying to foist on Europe.
Yet perhaps what is needed is not a codified Constitution, but another Magna Carta: an articulation of the traditional rights of citizens that must be observed by the Crown and its government.
www.samizdata.net /blog/archives/005166.html   (3159 words)

  
 The soc.culture.new-zealand FAQ
Our constitution, like the British, consists of parliament's own conventions and rules of conduct, some legislation such as the New Zealand Constitution Act (1986, not enacted), and fundamental rules applied by the Courts which go back into English history.
The flag of NZ is blue with the flag of the UK in the upper hoist-side quadrant with four red five-pointed stars edged in white centered in the outer half of the flag; the stars represent the Southern Cross constellation.
The monarch is said to "reign but not rule": except for a residual power to actually govern in the event of some complete breakdown of the parliamentary system, the monarch has merely ceremonial duties and advisory powers.
www.nz.com /NZ/nzfaq.html   (14951 words)

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