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Topic: Cognate


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In the News (Tue 20 Aug 19)

  
  Cognate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cognates need not have the same meaning: dish (English) and Tisch ("table", German), or starve (English) and sterben ("die", German), or head (English) and chef ("chief, head", French), serve as examples as to how cognate terms may diverge in meaning as languages develop separately, eventually becoming false friends.
In some cases, one of the cognate pairs has an ultimate source in another language related to English, while the other one is native, as happened with many loanwords from Old Norse (which was mutually intelligible with Old English) borrowed when the Vikings conquered part of England.
False cognates are words that are commonly thought to be related (have a common origin) whereas linguistic examination reveals they are unrelated.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cognate   (758 words)

  
 Cognate - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Examples of cognates are the words night (English), Nacht (German), noc (Czech), nox (Latin), and nakti- (Sanskrit), all meaning night and all deriving from a common Indo-European origin.
Cognates may not have the same meaning: dish (English) and Tisch ("table", German), or starve (English) and sterben ("die", German), or head (English) and chef ("chief, head", French) serve as examples as to how words may diverge in meaning as languages develop separately.
False friends are similar to false cognates, but differ in that false friends, though they have different meanings, may in fact be cognates.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Cognate   (589 words)

  
 False cognate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
False cognates are a pair of words in the same or different languages that are similar in form and meaning but have different roots.
As an example of false cognates, the word for "dog" in the Australian Aboriginal language Mbabaram happens to be dog, although there is no common ancestor or other connection between that language and English (the Mbabaram word evolved regularly from a protolinguistic form *gudaga).
One difference between false cognates and false friends is that while false cognates mean roughly the same thing in two languages, false friends bear two distinct (sometimes even opposite) meanings.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/False_cognate   (779 words)

  
 Cognate
These words are cognates since they originate in the same root (English borrowing "to pay" from Norman French, and French inheriting venir by the course of language evolution from Vulgar Latin).
False cognates are words that people often think to be related while they're really not.
Although perhaps not technically accurate, the term "false cognate" is sometimes used to refer to false friends, pairs of words in different languages that look like they might mean the same thing but don't.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/co/Cognate.html   (295 words)

  
 Cognate Encyclopedia Article @ LandCompany.com (Land Company)
In Historical linguistics, cognates are words — in one or more languages — that have a common origin, meaning that they are descended from the same word, possibly in a common predecessor language.
Cognates need not have the same meaning: dish (False cognates) and Tisch ("table", Kurdish), or starve () and sterben ("die", Catalan), or head (Greek) and chef ("chief, head", French), serve as examples as to how cognate terms may All articles lacking sources as languages develop separately, eventually becoming Romanian.
In addition to having separate meanings, cognates through processes of linguistic change may no longer resemble each other phonetically: cow and beef both derive from the same Indo-European root *gʷou-, cow having developed through the Old Norse while beef has arrived in English from the Italo-Romance family descent.
www.landcompany.com /encyclopedia/Cognate   (900 words)

  
 Seminar in Second Language Acquisition   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Criteria for cognate pairing is based on whatever address is activated in the mental lexicon regardless of the etymological relationship (or lack thereof) between entry and input.
It was concluded that cognate recognition played a major part in the students’ successful strategies because the scores were deemed highest for words which were "similar or almost similar in pronunciation to their Swedish translational equivalents", that is, they most often recognized the cognates that sounded the same.
One concern to be addressed is that cognate pairing is not the majority rule, that is, it is by far the lesser, not the greater part of the modern German vocabulary meanings that may be surmised in this way.
webgerman.com /caplan/Portfolio/Caplan/cognates/index.html   (5061 words)

  
 Cognate BioServices : Experienced Team in Cell and Biological Therapy Commercialization
Cognate BioServices, Inc. was formed to provide full commercialization support to companies developing varied cellular technologies, encountering translational challenges in development, manufacturing, quality, regulatory and delivery.
Cognate has a fully integrated company with highly experienced technical staff and management team, along with a fully validated cGMP Manufacturing facility and state of the art research and development laboratories.
Cognate also has the ability to rapidly advance technology from early research stages through pre-clinical & process development, GMP manufacturing and scale-up, regulatory submission to the clinic.
www.cognatetherapeutics.com   (261 words)

  
 False cognate - Glasgledius   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
A pair of false cognates consists of two words in different languages that appear to be or are sometimes considered cognates when they're really not.
Although perhaps not technically accurate, the term "false cognate" is sometimes used to describe a false friend.
The difference between a false cognate and a false friend is that while a false cognate means roughly the same thing in both languages, a false friend generally means either the opposite (Welsh ie = "yes" vs. Japanese iie = "no") or something completely unrelated.
www.glasglow.com /E2/fa/False_cognate.html   (206 words)

  
 false cognate Information Center - english false cognates
A pair of false cognates consists of two words in different languages that appear to be or are sometimes considered cognates (words in different languages with a common root) when they false spanish cognates are in fact not.
Similarly, false cognate the Korean word manhi (an adverb meaning "plentifully") resembles the English "many" and in the Japanese language the word 'to occur' happens to be okoru.
According false cognates to Jakobson, these words are the first word-like english false cognates sounds made by babbling babies; and parents tend to associate the first sound babies make with themselves.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Linguistic_Topics_Cr_-_G/false_cognate.html   (560 words)

  
 ¡Colorín Colorado! Using cognates to develop comprehension in English
Cognates are words in two languages that share a similar meaning, spelling, and pronunciation.
Cognate awareness is the ability to use cognates in a primary language as a tool for understanding a second language.
As students move up the grade levels, they can be introduced to more sophisticated cognates, and to cognates that have multiple meanings in both languages, although some of those meanings may not overlap.
www.colorincolorado.org /introduction/cognates.php   (654 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Cognate   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Examples of cognates are the words night (English), Nacht (German), nicht (Scots), noc (Czech), nox (Latin), and nakti- (Sanskrit), all meaning night and all deriving from a common Indo-European origin.
In all of these cases, one of the cognate pairs has an ultimate source in another language related to English, while the other one is native.
Cognates may not have the same meaning: dish (English) and Tisch ("table", German), or starve (English) and sterben ("die", German), or head (English) and chef ("chief, head", French) serve as examples as to how cognate terms may diverge in meaning as languages develop separately.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Cognate   (613 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Cognate
Veda [Sanskrit,=knowledge, cognate with English wit, from a root meaning know ], oldest scriptures of Hinduism and the most ancient religious texts in an Indo-European language.
The authority of the Veda as stating the essential truths of Hinduism is still accepted to some extent by all Hindus.
Cognate Therapeutics Announces Appointment of Brandon J. Price as Chief Executive Officer.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Cognate   (421 words)

  
 [No title]
This cognate prepares candidates for leadership in music education as teacher educators, music education administrators, and music education curricular leaders.
Cognate To be eligible for the Music Education cognate, an admitted doctoral student would need to hold a master’s degree in either music education or music.
Dissertation Committee The dissertation committee composition, for those students pursuing the Music Education cognate, would consist of at least one faculty member from the Leadership faculty of SEHS plus at least one faculty member from MTD, or a combination of MTD, SEHS, and/or other CAS faculty with appropriate expertise.
www.oakland.edu /senate/musiccognate.doc   (296 words)

  
 Re: use.of.'cognate'?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
There is the cognate of form, and the cognate of substance.
Robertson distinguishes between formal cognate and "quasi-cognate": It may be either that of inner content,..., objective result..., or even a kindred word in idea but a different root, as DARHSETAI OLIGAS (PLHRAS, Lu.
Considerable freedom must thus be given the term 'cognate' as to both form and idea.
www.ibiblio.org /bgreek/archives/97-05/msg00274.html   (199 words)

  
 Cognate - RecipeFacts   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
[1] In lingustics, cognates are words in one or more languages that have a common origin, meaning that they are descendents of a same word, possibly in a common predecessor language.
In addition to having separate meanings, cognates through processes of linguistic change may no longer resemble each other phonetically: cow and beef both derive from the same Indo-European root *gTemplate:PIEou-, cow having developed through the Germanic language family while beef has arrived in English from the Italo-Romance family descent.
Template:Main False cognates are words that are commonly thought to be related (have a common origin) whereas linguistic examination reveals they are unrelated.
www.recipeland.com /facts/Cognate   (681 words)

  
 FALSE COGNATE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
False cognates are particularly common in core or common vocabulary, as shown by this last example.
Such cognates often occur in kinship terms (!Kung ba and French papa ; or Navajo má, Chinese mā, and English "mother") or in numbers.
The term "false cognate" is sometimes misused to describe a false friend.
www.yotor.org /wiki/en/fa/False%20cognate.htm   (170 words)

  
 FALSE COGNATE : Dictionary Entry
A word that appears to be cognate - to have a shared linguistic origin to a given word, but is in fact unrelated.
English have and Latin habere are thought to be false cognates (have is more likely cognate to capere).
Thus, they are only false cognates in sense 2.
www.bibleocean.com /OmniDictionary/false_cognate   (117 words)

  
 Cognate Details, Meaning Cognate Article and Explanation Guide
Cognates are words of different languages that have a common etymology, that is they derive from a common root.
Examples of cognates are the words night (English), nacht (German), noc (Czech), noche (Spanish), nuit (French) and notte (Italian), all meaning night and all deriving from a common Indo-European root.
The English word milk is clearly a cognate of German Milch and of Russian moloko, but less obviously of French lait, Spanish leche and Greek galaktos.
www.e-paranoids.com /c/co/cognate.html   (477 words)

  
 cognate
Either way, through the ME specialties, the students receive deeper insight into an area of study in which they, and possibly their co-op employer, are interested in.
The Cognate is an alternative to the specialty for some ME students to address the unique engineering needs of their employer and/or their career objectives.
The Cognate is designed to give the students flexibility in the field of Medical Engineering without jeopardizing the fundamentals of the Mechanical Engineering discipline.
www2.kettering.edu /~tbrown/cognate.html   (409 words)

  
 Cognate Foundations
A limited number (one or two) learning outcomes should be added to the current learning outcomes for each of the four Cognate Areas that explicitly build on and advance those for the Foundations for Inquiry (BSC 100), and meet SUNY Turstees' Critical Thinking learning outcomes.
All courses in each Cognate area must include all learning outcomes, and meet all criteria for inclusion in that area.
All committee recommendations are subject to ratification by the IFOC and the College Senate Curriculum Committee and may be appealed via established procedures to the College Senate Curriculum Committee.
faculty.buffalostate.edu /koritzdg/cognates.htm   (1856 words)

  
 ltccognate.htm
Many doctoral programs include the requirement or expectation that a student's doctoral program will include a "cognate" or area of study outside their specialization, which commonly means taking 3 or 4 courses (9 to 12 credits) outside the main requirements of the program.
Such a cognate is designed to both encourage and allow students to broaden their program of studies.
Note that the title of your cognate is not constrained to an official title but should reflect an area you wish to foreground in your studies and career.
www.msu.edu /user/pdickson/ltcweb/ltccognate.htm   (532 words)

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