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Topic: Confederated Tribes of Siletz


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  Confederated Tribes of Siletz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Confederated Tribes of Siletz in the United States is a federally-recognized confederation of 27 Native American tribal bands that once inhabited a range from northern California to southwest Washington.
In 1977, the Confederation became the second tribe in the U.S. to have its federal status restored.
It includes remnants of the Siletz, a Coast Salish people who inhabited the area up until the middle 19th century but who are no longer counted separately in the larger confederation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Confederated_Tribes_of_Siletz   (408 words)

  
 The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon: Tribal Government Operations, Child Welfare Code
The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon recognizes that its future as a social and political entity depends greatly on the Youth of the Tribe.
B. Upon the intervention of the Tribe in a non-tribal proceeding, responsibility for the legal aspects of the case shall be the tribal attorney's with advice and assistance from the Committee and the Family Advocate.
The Siletz Tribal Council may petition a court of competent jurisdiction on behalf of the Confederated Tribes to invalidate any action for foster care placement or termination of parental rights under state law where such action is alleged to have violated the Indian Child Welfare Act.
doc.narf.org /nill/Codes/siletzcode/silcode15childwelfare.htm   (4266 words)

  
 Oregon Judicial Department - Publications
The parties agree that because Siletz is a federally recognized Indian tribe, it is not subject to ORS chapter 657 in the absence of an election to be treated as such.
Siletz expressly asserted in its 1979 election that it was an "employing unit." To qualify as an "employing unit," Siletz had to satisfy one of the alternative definitions specified in ORS 657.020(1) (1977).
Siletz argues, in a footnote to its brief on review, that if EAB had granted its request for reconsideration, Siletz would have introduced affidavits by tribal members averring that the eleven employees for whom coverage was elected excluded tribal council members.
www.publications.ojd.state.or.us /A104705.htm   (4301 words)

  
 Printable Version
This is the 28th year the Siletz Tribe has celebrated the signing of Public Law 95-195, which re-established government-to-government relations between the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians and the federal government.
The Siletz Tribe was among the tribes of Western Oregon that were terminated from federal recognition in August 1954.
The Siletz Tribe was the second in the nation - and the first in Oregon - to achieve restoration.
www.newportnewstimes.com /articles/2005/11/11/community/community08.prt   (381 words)

  
 Siletz - Ethnos - Books about the Siletz People
Siletz (tribe) is a Native American tribe in western Oregon in the United States.
The Confederated Tribes of Siletz are actually a confederation of 27 tribal bands ranging from Northern California to southwest Washington state.
The tribe was forcibly moved onto their reservation in 1855; in 1955, the tribe's federal recognition status was terminated.
www.almudo.com /ethnos/Siletz.htm   (143 words)

  
 HUD's Daily Message - Nov 25, 2002   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians - From the Brink of Oblivion to Front Runners in Achievement
Through the years, the size of the Siletz Reservation was reduced to 225,279 acres, and continued to shrink until 1954 - when the Siletz Tribe, along with many tribes in western Oregon, lost federal recognition.
They were the second tribe in the nation to be restored and recognized, and one of the tribes that became an early member of the Self-Governance Demonstration Project.
www.hud.gov /news/focus.cfm?content=2002-11-25.cfm   (933 words)

  
 Native American Documents Project
The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians are the descendants of a large number of tribes and bands of coastal Indians who were grouped on the 1.4 million acre Coast Reservation in Oregon in the 1850's.
Termination of the Siletz Tribe has meant that while unemployment, health problems, alcoholism, and the school dropout rate have risen dramatically since the time of termination, the means for dealing with these problems have been withdrawn.
The Confederated Siletz are the contemporary representatives of a large number of tribes and bands of western Oregon Indians, many of which were forcibly removed by the Army from their homelands and transported to the Coast Reservation in the 1850's.
www.csusm.edu /nadp/d126.htm   (3985 words)

  
 History of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz - Siletz Tribal Business Corporation
In November 1977, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz was the second tribe in the U S and the first in Oregon to be restored to federal recognition.
The Siletz Reservation reached from Cape Lookout in Tillamook County on the north to near the mouth of the Umpqua River on the South.
After years of working together as a united people, the Siletz Tribe was restored and reasserted their Indian identity with the enactment of the Siletz Restoration Act, PL 95-195 on November 18, 1977.
www.stbcorp.net /home.cfm?dir_cat=35718   (703 words)

  
 Cow Creek/Umpqua Tribe: Oregon Tribes
The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians are the aboriginal inhabitants of the central and south-central coast of Oregon.
Federal recognition was restored to the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians in October of 1984.
It is the land of the Warm Springs, Wasco and Paiute Native American Tribes, stretching from the snowcapped summit of the Cascade Mountains to the palisaded cliffs of the Deschutes River.
www.cowcreek.com /tribes/index.html   (709 words)

  
 C O N S T I T U T I O N OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF SILETZ INDIANS OF OREGON
We, the members of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon, being a federal Indian tribe and organized pursuant to the Act of November 18, 1977, 91 Stat.
Upon receipt and verification by the Election Board of a petition of at least one-third of the General Council of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon, it shall be the duty of the Tribal Council to call a special election to consider the recall of the elected tribal official named in the petition.
This Constitution may be amended by a majority vote of the qualified voters of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon voting at an election called for that purpose by the Secretary of the Interior.
www.tribalresourcecenter.org /ccfolder/siletz_const.htm   (2457 words)

  
 The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon: Tribal Government Operations, Liquor Control Ordinance
The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon does not agree with the alleged authority of the United States or the State of Oregon to interfere with the Siletz Tribe's sovereign authority to regulate the control of liquor within Siletz Indian country.
No consent to jurisdiction in the courts of the State of Oregon and no consent to limited waiver of the Siletz Tribe's sovereign immunity shall be implied or inferred except through negotiation and express consent to jurisdiction and limited waiver of sovereign immunity in a valid intergovernmental agreement.
Amendment or modification of regulation by the Siletz Tribe of the sale and possession of liquor shall not be effective until this Ordinance has been validly amended pursuant to STC §14.39, and such amendment has been approved by appropriate officials of the United States Department of the Interior, as required by federal law.
www.narf.org /nill/Codes/siletzcode/silcode24liqcontrolord.htm   (3116 words)

  
 The People are Dancing Again - Multimedia Collection
For more than a century, the various tribes and bands that make up the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians endured war, removal, death, and loss of their homeland at the hands of the Europeans who were attracted by the rich resources that existed on our ancestors' homeland.
The Siletz Reservation was whittled down from 1.1 million acres to the allotments (about 44,000 acres) and five sections of tribal timber.
The Siletz Tribe was restored in 1977, the first in Oregon and the second in the nation to regain federal recognition.
osulibrary.oregonstate.edu /video/nat45.html   (255 words)

  
 [No title]
For purposes of this section "Siletz blood" is defined as all Indian blood derived from a direct ancestor who was named on any roll or records of Siletz tribal members prepared by the Department of the Interior prior to the effective date of this Constitution.
VOTERS All duly enrolled members of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon who are eighteen (18) years of age or older shall have the right to vote in all tribal elections.
A R T I C L E V I I I AMENDMENT This Constitution may be amended by a majority vote of the qualified voters of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon voting at an election called for that purpose by the Secretary of the Interior.
www.cwis.org /fwdp/Resolutions/Tribal/siletzcn.txt   (2282 words)

  
 Resources on the Confederated Tribes of Siletz
In November of 1977 the Confederated Tribes of Siletz was the second tribe in the
Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians 201 SE Swan Ave Siletz, OR 97380 E...
The tribe's federal recognition status was terminated in 1955, but in 1977, the Confederation became the second tribe in the U.S. to have its federal status restored.
www.mongabay.com /indigenous_ethnicities/north_american/Confederated_Tribes_of_Siletz.html   (858 words)

  
 Oregon Blue Book Tribal Information
In 1977, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz won restoration; followed by the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians in 1982; the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde in 1983; the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians in 1984; the Klamath Tribes in 1986 and the Coquille Tribe in 1989.
A reservation community includes enrolled members of the tribe or tribes for whom the reservation was established, as well as Indians from other tribes living on the reservation.
Reservations are in various stages of planning for the Klamath Tribes, the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians and the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw.
bluebook.state.or.us /national/tribal/tribal.htm   (916 words)

  
 Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge consists of some of the most scenic estuarine habitat along the Pacific Coast Scenic Byway.
Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge was established to protect salt marsh, brackish marsh, tidal sloughs, mudflats, and coniferous and deciduous forestland.
Siletz Bay Refuge is closed to public use, except during special events.
www.fws.gov /oregoncoast/siletzbay   (306 words)

  
 JTR: State and Tribal Profiles - Confederated Tribes of Siletz
Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon (‘94 - Fish Waste and Wood By-Product Compost Operation)
The Siletz Tribe worked to establish a joint-venture fish waste and wood by-product compost operation.
The enterprise was designed to provide employment and financial opportunities to the tribal community, while reducing the amount of waste entering municipal solid waste landfills.
www.epa.gov /epaoswer/non-hw/recycle/jtr/state/siletz.htm   (99 words)

  
 Confederated Tribes Of Siletz
The discovery of gold in the land of the Takelma in the rogue River Valley during the winter of 1851 brought white miners by the thousands.
In 1956 through PL 588, the Western Oregon Termination Act, the government terminated the Siletz tribe, declaring they are not longer "Indians." The remaining Siletz lands were sold and Government Hill was given to the city of Siletz.
The tribe set goals long ago to build a tribal cultural and community center to maintain its unique relationship with the land.
oregonstate.edu /instruct/soc204/plazad/native2/marya/marya.htm   (609 words)

  
 Siletz School Profile
Siletz School is located in the Lincoln County town of Siletz, near the center of a large bend in the Siletz River.
A nearby landmark is Government Hill, a traditional spiritual center of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz.
Siletz School offers students the opportunity to learn about the cultural history of their town.
www.pioneer.net /~PEAS/Peas_Siletz_Profile.htm   (165 words)

  
 NAGPRA NOTICES OF INVENTORY COMPLETION: Notice of Inventory Completion: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, ...
The Alsea/Siuslaw tribe was a signatory to the Oregon Coast Treaty of 1855.
The Alsea/Siuslaw tribe is one of the member tribes of the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon and by 1875, the Alsea/Siuslaw tribe was residing on the Siletz Reservation.
The Alsea/Siuslaw tribe is a distinct and separate tribe, and distinguished from the Alcea band of Tillamooks, which brought a land claim to the Indian Claims Commission in 1955.
www.cr.nps.gov /nagpra/fed_notices/nagpradir/nic0869.html   (956 words)

  
 Reservation Life Document Siletz Reservation Map 1900
Allotment, which began on the Siletz in 1887, involved the survey of the reservation land base and its division into a rationalized grid of townships, sections, and quarter-sections.
In 1954, the federal government terminated the Siletz and liquidated what little remained of their reservation.
The federal relationship with the Siletz was reestablished in 1977 after years of organizing and lobbying by tribal members.
www.ohs.org /education/focus_on_oregon_history/RLO-Document-Siletz-Reservation-Map-1900.cfm   (401 words)

  
 Oregon Judicial Department - Publications
Midway through the trial, the tribe filed a motion to transfer jurisdiction over the two older children to the tribe.
Mother and the tribe also assign error to the trial court's denial of her motion to dismiss the petitions.
He is recognized by the tribe as being knowledgeable in tribal customs, including knowledge of social and cultural standards relating to child rearing practices within the tribe.
www.publications.ojd.state.or.us /A112136.htm   (2508 words)

  
 Department of Land Conservation and Development Government to Government Relations
The 2001 Oregon Legislature enacted SB 770 (ORS 182.162-.168) formalizing the government-to-government relationship that exists between Oregon´s Indian tribes and the State of Oregon.
Agency managers and others who communicate with the tribes are to be trained in tribal matters, participate in annual meetings and prepare annual reports.
Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians
www.lcd.state.or.us /LCD/govtogov.shtml   (205 words)

  
 NADAG: North American Database of Archaeological Geophysics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Rogers, M. Detection of Burials at the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians Historic Period Cemetery, Oregon: A Comparison of Ground-Based Remote Sensing Methods.
Without a characterization of the geophysical signature of the marked burials, it is difficult to identify unmarked burials at the Siletz cemetery.
Due to the success of the radar at "seeing" all four marked burials it may be possible to identify areas free of unmarked burials.
www.cast.uark.edu /nadag/projects_database/Rogers3/Rogers3-abs.htm   (245 words)

  
 The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon: Tribal Government Operations and Tribal Court Code
The purpose of this Section is to provide for the issuance of these tags by the Tribe to tribal members and the regulation of their use in accordance with the Agreement.
All fish caught under this Section shall be reported to the Committee and shall be prepared or preserved as appropriate and distributed to elderly and needy members of the Tribe or used for tribal gatherings at the discretion of the Committee.
The Tribe and its members have the right to gather eels (lampreys), seaweed and fresh water mussels within Lincoln County for non-commercial uses subject to the State's right to regulate for conservation purposes.
www.tribalresourcecenter.org /ccfolder/silcode14huntingetcord.htm   (3573 words)

  
 | The Isaac I. Stevens and Joel Palmer Treaties, 1855–2005 | Oregon Historical Quarterly, 106.3 | The History ...
62 of the 109 tribes and bands terminated by the U.S. government in the Termination Act of 1954 were native to Oregon.
     Attended by delegates from the confederated tribes of the Makah, viz: Neah Waatch, Tsoo-Yess, and Osett.
     Attended by delegates of the confederated tribes of the Flathead, Kootenay, and Upper Pend d'Oreilles.
www.historycooperative.org /journals/ohq/106.3/reference.html   (514 words)

  
 Medford District Office - Table Rock   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
In the early 1970’s the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians began reorganizing and holding meetings again.
After the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin was restored to federal recognition as a tribe in 1973, the Siletz people started on the same path.
In 1977, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians became the second tribe in the nation to have their termination act repealed with passage of the Siletz restoration Act.
www.blm.gov /or/resources/recreation/tablerock/table-rock-takelma-today.htm   (284 words)

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