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Topic: Confucianism


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  Confucianism
Confucianism survived its suppression during the Qin Dynasty partly thanks to the discovery of a trove of Confucian classics hidden in the walls of a scholar's house.
Study of the Confucian classics became the basis of the government examination system and the core of the educational curriculum.
One theme central to Confucianism is that of relationships, and the differing duties arising from the different status one held in relation to others.
www.crystalinks.com /confucianism.html   (1135 words)

  
  Confucianism - Search View - MSN Encarta
Confucianism, major system of thought in Chinese philosophy, developed from the teachings of Confucius and his disciples, and concerned with the principles of good conduct, statecraft, practical wisdom, and proper social relationships.
Confucianism has influenced the Chinese attitude towards life, set the patterns of living and standards of social value, and provided the intellectual underpinning for Chinese political theories and institutions.
Nevertheless, the Confucian Classics continued to be the chief source of learning for scholars, and with the restoration of peace and prosperity in the Tang dynasty (618-906), the spread of Confucianism was encouraged.
uk.encarta.msn.com /text_761553693__1/Confucianism.html   (2531 words)

  
 Confucianism
Confucianism intertwined with the doctrines of the yin-yang and the Five Elements and even with the popularly apocryphal writings, in which Confucianism was interpreted in religious, mystical and prophetic terms, and Confucius himself was taken as the 'uncrowned king'.
Confucianism in the 19th century was puzzled by the advances made by western powers and the contrasting weakness of China, a perception which caused many people to adopt a critical and suspicious attitude toward traditional values.
Reformed Confucianism was propagated in the name of reviving the New Text School of the Han dynasty, and for a while became a powerful current in the establishment of Confucianism as the state religion, as Christianity was in the west.
philtar.ucsm.ac.uk /encyclopedia/confuc/geness.html   (1586 words)

  
  Confucianism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Confucianism as passed down to the 20th and 21st centuries derives primarily from the school of the Neo-Confucians, led by Zhu Xi, who gave Confucianism renewed vigour in the Song and later dynasties.
Confucianism survived its suppression during the Qin Dynasty partly thanks to the discovery of a trove of Confucian classics hidden in the walls of a scholar's house.
As a result Confucianism was promoted and the corporation of men it produced became an effective counter to the remaining landowner aristocrats otherwise threatening the unity of the state.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Confucianism   (4845 words)

  
 Confucianism - ReligionFacts
Confucianism is a way of life taught by Confucius in the 6th–5th century BC.
The terms "Confucianism" and "Confucian," derived from the Latinized Confucius, are not meaningful terms in Chinese.
A revival of Confucian thought in the 11th century produced Neo-Confucianism, a major influence in Korea during the Choson dynasty and in Japan during the Tokugawa period.
www.religionfacts.com /a-z-religion-index/confucianism.htm   (1240 words)

  
 Confucianism
There are five basic human relationships in Confucianism: (1) ruler to ruled; (2) father to son; (3) husband to wife; (4) elder brother to younger brother; and (5) friend to friend.
Confucianism had no need of war, because if everyone is following their proper role then there should be no war.
Confucianism continued to be stressed and taught to children in Japan right up to 1945.
www.openhistory.org /jhdp/intro/node35.html   (699 words)

  
 Confucianism
The Religion of China : Confucianism and Taoism.
Confucianism and Ecology : The Interrelation of Heaven, Earth, and Humans (Religions of the World and Ecology) ~
Tokugawa Confucian Education : The Kangien Academy of Hirose Tanso (1782-1856) ~
www.china-on-site.com /mall/confu.htm   (1410 words)

  
 The Spiritual Sanctuary Celebrates Confucianism
Confucianism ceased to be the state ideology in China and lost its privilege in other East Asian countries a long time ago.
It seems that Confucianism has no longer had any part to play in modern life, at least not in the life of the Chinese living in Mainland China; and that its influence, if any, is considered only negative or as some people like to say, conservative or even reactionary.
In this sense, we may say that Confucianism as a value system is still functioning in today's world and as a living force Confucianism holds not only the motives of social integration but also the solutions and resolutions of inter-religious conflict.
www.thespiritualsanctuary.org /Confucianism/Confucianism.html   (3144 words)

  
 Confucianism - MSN Encarta
Confucianism, an intellectual, political, and religious tradition, or school of thought, that developed a distinct identity in the 5th century bc from the teachings of Chinese philosopher Confucius.
In Chinese the name for this tradition is Rujia (also spelled Ju-chia), meaning “School of the Scholars.” Confucianism advocates reforming government, so that it works for the benefit of the people, and cultivating virtue, especially in government officials.
Confucianism began in China, but it spread from there to Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761553693/Confucianism.html   (712 words)

  
 Vietnam travel and holidays - Vietnamese Confucianism
Confucianism’s originator, K’ung Fu Tzu (Latinised to Confucius), was an official in the Chinese court.
Confucianism was firmly implanted in Vietnam during the thousand years of its occupation by China and mirrored its development.
However, the value of Confucianism as a moderating influence upon social behaviour is being rapidly superseded by the need for flexibility and openness in a developing society.
www.vietnam-holidays.co.uk /aboutvietnam/rconfucianism.htm   (579 words)

  
 Confucianism - ninemsn Encarta
Confucianism, major system of thought in Chinese philosophy, developed from the teachings of Confucius and his disciples, and concerned with the principles of good conduct, statecraft, practical wisdom, and proper social relationships.
The principles of Confucianism are contained in the nine ancient Chinese works handed down by Confucius and his followers, who lived during the Zhou dynasty in an age of great philosophic activity.
Nevertheless, the Confucian Classics continued to be the chief source of learning for scholars, and with the restoration of peace and prosperity in the Tang dynasty (618-906), the spread of Confucianism was encouraged.
au.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761553693/Confucianism.html   (2051 words)

  
 Confucianism, Confucius
The Confucian school functioned as a recruiting ground for government positions, which were filled by those scoring highest on examinations in the Confucian classics.
Confucian philosophy presupposes a view of human nature in which humans are essentially social animals whose mode of social interaction is shaped by li (convention or ritual), which establishes value distinctions and prescribes activities in response to those distinctions.
Confucianism emerged as a more coherent philosophy when faced with intellectual competition from other schools that were growing in the fertile social upheavals of preimperial China (c.
mb-soft.com /believe/txo/confuciu.htm   (1913 words)

  
 Confucianism - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Confucianism has often had to contend with other religious systems, notably Taoism and Buddhism, and has at times, especially from the 3d to the 7th cent., suffered marked declines.
The overthrow (1911-12) of the monarchy, with which Confucianism had been closely identified, led to the disintegration of Confucian institutions and a decline of Confucian traditions, a process accelerated after the Communist revolution (1949).
Elements of Confucianism survived as a part of traditional Chinese religious practice in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macao and among Chinese emigrants and have experienced a modest revival in China since the mid-1990s.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-confucia.html   (731 words)

  
 Background Essay no. 38 | Confucianism | AskAsia.org
Confucianism is often characterized as a system of social and ethical philosophy rather than a religion.
Confucianism was part of the Chinese social fabric and way of life; to Confucians, everyday life was the arena of religion.
Thus one side of Confucianism was the affirmation of accepted values and norms of behavior in primary social institutions and basic human relationships.
www.askasia.org /teachers/essays/essay.php?no=38   (1445 words)

  
 IDS 3313
Confucianism is not as much a religion in the traditional sense than a set of rules for proper human interaction, a system of social ethics concerned with the formal, external aspects of life.
Confucianism places much emphasis on the idea of the "superior man"--the individual who has trained himself to do what is socially demanded.
The Chinese concept of justice is not a cold intellectual principle, but a kind of compassionate wisdom (however, it is a wisdom which finds nothing at all amiss with torturing girls and women by breaking the bones of their feet in the foot-binding tradition).
www.usao.edu /~usao-ids3313/ids/html/confucianism.html   (1574 words)

  
 Neo-Confucianism
These were intimately linked, for in the Confucian view morality or humanity consisted primarily in the cultivation and conduct of proper social relationships, and the essence of government was morality.
Confucianism as a con­ventional social morality or a form of learning associated with gov­ernment service was commonly regarded as a complement to the more profound philosophy and spirituality of Buddhism.
The Analects, the classic containing the words of Confucius himself recorded by his direct disciples, remained, as always, fundamental: the Sung Confu­cians understood themselves as finally recovering the full meaning of the ancient deposit of sage wisdom, and it was necessary that the words of the Master himself inform and sanction their vision.
faculty.washington.edu /mkalton/NeoConfucianism.htm   (1141 words)

  
 Confucius, K'ung-fu-tzu
Confucian ethics are certainly clear and uncompromising, with points of similarity to Immanuel Kant and Christianity.
While the practice of Confucianism was not entirely consistent with these principles of Confucius just expressed, his attitude did have a significant effect on the conduct of Chinese religion, where popular gods possessed less status in terms of politics and high culture than we see in most other civilizations.
Confucians originally thought of Buddhists as similarly un-Chinese; but Buddhism became so popular after the fall of the Later Hàn Dynasty (220 AD) that, by the time of the Suí (590-618) and T'ang [Táng] (618-906), it was accepted as properly Chinese.
www.friesian.com /confuci.htm   (4105 words)

  
 Confucianism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Confucianism is most important because it acts as a cultural outline for China and all the countries China has had an influence on.
Confucianism is even reflected in Mao Tse Tung's works, but is more of an underlying theme, rather than the dominant role it had played for over two millennia.
Confucianism is a school on culture, and part of a culture is its folk songs and stories, the ceremonies and rituals.
www.barbaria.com /god/philosophy/zen/06.htm   (2677 words)

  
 Confucianism
Confucianism is humanism, a philosophy or attitude that is concerned with human beings, their achievements and interests, rather than with the abstract beings and problems of theology.
In the political chaos that followed the fall of the Han dynasty, Confucianism was overshadowed by the rival philosophies of Taoism and Buddhism, and the philosophy suffered a temporary setback.
Nevertheless, the Confucian Classics continued to be the chief source of learning for scholars, and with the restoration of peace and prosperity in the Tang dynasty (618-907), the spread of Confucianism was encouraged.
www2.sunysuffolk.edu /pecorip/SCCCWEB/ETEXTS/PHIL_of_RELIGION_TEXT/CHAPTER_2_RELIGIONS/Confucianism.htm   (2355 words)

  
 FORE: Religion- Confucianism-Introduction
Confucian ethics in its most comprehensive form relies on a cosmological context of the entire triad of heaven, earth, and humans.
With the Confucian emphasis on the continuity of the family there is a strong ethic of indebtedness to past generations and obligations to descendants.
Confucian education as essentially a form of moral cultivation has been viewed as a means of contributing to the betterment of the sociopolitical order.
environment.harvard.edu /religion/religion/confucianism   (1786 words)

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