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Topic: Congenital problems


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  Lifespan's A - Z Health Information Library - Congenital heart disease
Congenital heart disease refers to a problem with the heart's structure and function due to abnormal heart development before birth.
Other problems, such as a small ventricular septal defect (VSD), may never cause any problems and some people with a VSD have normal physical activity and a normal life span.
Congenital heart disease is often divided into two types: cyanotic (blue discoloration caused by a relative lack of oxygen) and non-cyanotic.
www.lifespan.org /adam/healthillustratedencyclopedia/1/001114.html   (661 words)

  
  Congenital Syphilis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Congenital syphilis is an infection caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum (syphilis) passed from...
Congenital syphilis is a chronic infectious disease caused by a spirochete (treponema pallidum) acquired by the...
Congenital syphilis is an infection caused by the spirochete...
www.syphilis-information.com /congenital-syphilis_10.html   (1177 words)

  
 The Adult with Congenital Heart Disease: Health Topics: University of Iowa Health Care
The word congenital means born with, and this is different than the more common heart diseases that people acquire sometime after birth either from infection, coronary artery disease, trauma, and other problems.
Many children born with heart problems live to be active, normally functioning adults, and there are some heart conditions that people are born with that are so well tolerated that sometimes they are not even discovered until the person is a young adult or even elderly.
Congenital heart disease is not as common as high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, or some of the other problems discussed today.
www.uihealthcare.com /topics/medicaldepartments/internalmedicine/congenheartdisease/index.html   (1310 words)

  
 National Scoliosis Foundation
A: Congenital scoliosis is not a common problem: approximately one person in every 10,000 is affected, and that number has remained fairly stable over the years.
For example, with congenital bracing seldom works; the bones themselves are crooked or deformed and a brace on the outside simply can't affect a discrepancy on one side or the other of the vertebral column.
A: As I've said, with congenital scoliosis, one side of the spine is growing faster than the other, so to solve the problem- -since we cannot put growth tissue in a place where it doesn't exist--we do anterior (front) and/or posterior (back) 'growth arrest' surgery.
www.scoliosis.org /resources/medicalupdates/congenital.php   (1165 words)

  
 Heart Valve Problems
In 2 percent to 4 percent of heart valve problems, the heart defect is related to health or environmental factors that affected the mother during pregnancy.
Congenital aortic stenosis — When a child is born with congenital aortic stenosis, the problem is almost always a bicuspid aortic valve, meaning the valve has two flaps instead of the usual three.
Congenital pulmonic stenosis — In the relatively few newborns with severe congenital pulmonic stenosis, the child develops heart failure or cyanosis (a bluish color to the lips, fingernails and skin) within the first month of life.
www.health.am /diseases/more/heart_valve_problems   (1931 words)

  
 Congenital Heart Disease
Often, congenital heart defects are a result of one of these crucial steps not happening at the right time, leaving a hole where a dividing wall should have formed, or a single blood vessel where two ought to be, for example.
Problems that cause too much blood to pass through the lungs - These defects allow oxygen-rich blood that should be traveling to the body to re-circulate through the lungs, causing increased pressure and stress in the lungs.
Problems that cause too little blood to travel to the body - These defects are a result of underdeveloped chambers of the heart or blockages in blood vessels that prevent the proper amount of blood from traveling to the body to meet its needs.
www.chw.org /display/PPF/DocID/23403/router.asp   (1588 words)

  
 Congenital Anomalies and Inherited Disorders of the Horse
Congenital Anomalies and Inherited Disorders of the Horse
Congenital anomalies and inherited disorders of the horse include all of the physical abnormalities which are present upon birth of the foal and those that are diagnosed later in life.
Foals are born with difficulty (dystocia), fail to stand or nurse and have neurological problems (intermittent joint rigidity and rapid eye movements).
www.omafra.gov.on.ca /english/livestock/horses/facts/info_congenital.htm   (2524 words)

  
 Congenital Heart Defects - Children's Hospital Boston   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Problems that cause too much blood to pass through the lungs -- These defects allow oxygen-rich (red) blood that should be traveling to the body to re-circulate through the lungs, causing increased pressure and stress in the lungs.
Problems that cause too little blood to pass through the lungs — These defects allow blood that has not been to the lungs to pick up oxygen (and, therefore, is oxygen-poor) to travel to the body.
Problems that cause too little blood to travel to the body -- These defects are a result of underdeveloped chambers of the heart or blockages in blood vessels that prevent the proper amount of blood from traveling to the body to meet its needs.
www.childrenshospital.org /az/Site486/printerfriendlypageS486P0.html   (869 words)

  
 Cardiovascular Disorders - Overview of Congenital Heart Disease   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Often, congenital heart defects are a result of one of these crucial steps not happening at the right time, leaving a hole where a dividing wall should have formed, or a single blood vessel where two ought to be.
Some heart problems are likely to occur if the mother had a disease while pregnant and was taking medications, such as anti-seizure medicines.
Some heart problems can be watched by the child's physician and managed with medications, while others will require surgery, sometimes as soon as in the first few hours after birth.
www.driscollchildrens.org /esp/Greystone/cardiac/ochd.htm   (595 words)

  
 Congenital Heart Disease - Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Often, congenital heart defects are a result of one of these critical steps not happening at the right time, leaving a hole where a dividing wall should have formed, or a single blood vessel where two ought to be, for example.
problems that cause too much blood to pass through the lungs These defects allow oxygen-rich blood that should be traveling to the body to re-circulate through the lungs, causing increased pressure and stress in the lungs.
problems that cause too little blood to travel to the body These defects are a result of underdeveloped chambers of the heart or blockages in blood vessels that prevent the proper amount of blood from traveling to the body to meet its needs.
www.chop.edu /consumer/your_child/wellness_index.jsp?id=-8754   (1505 words)

  
 Congenital Heart Disease
Congenital heart disease is a type of defect or malformation in one or more structures of the heart or blood vessels that occurs before birth.
Congenital heart disease is often first detected when your doctor hears an abnormal heart sound or heart murmur when listening to your heart.
Most adults with congenital heart disease should be monitored by a heart specialist and take precautions to prevent endocarditis (a serious infection of the heart valves) throughout their life.
www.webmd.com /heart-disease/guide/congenital-heart-disease?page=1   (569 words)

  
 Overview of Congenital Heart Disease
Nine out of every 1,000 babies born in the United States have a congenital (present at birth) heart defect - a problem that occurred as the baby's heart was developing during pregnancy, before the baby is born.
A new subspecialty within cardiology is emerging as the number of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) is now greater than the number of babies born with CHD, as a result of the advances in diagnostic procedures and treatment interventions that have been made since 1945.
Knowledge about specific congenital heart conditions and expectations for long-term outcomes and potential complications, and risks must be reviewed as part of the successful transition from pediatric care to adult care.
www.healthsystem.virginia.edu /UVAHealth/peds_cardiac/chd.cfm   (1750 words)

  
 Years Later, Adults See Problems from Congenital Heart Defects
The problem is, few are aware of their risk, including some primary-care physicians, says Michael G. Earing, MD, an Assistant Professor of Medicine/Pediatrics at the Medical College of Wisconsin.
The chief reason so many patients with congenital heart defects have survived into adulthood, Dr. Earing notes, goes back to the invention of the pulmonary bypass machine, which made open-heart surgery possible and allowed the development of innovative surgical techniques to treat congenital heart disease.
To further address the problem, the American College of Cardiologists and the American Heart Association are developing new guidelines for treating adult congenital heart patients, including recommendations for specialized training for doctors.
healthlink.mcw.edu /article/1031002671.html   (878 words)

  
 Types of CHD and their Descriptions
Congenital aortic stenosis occurs in 3 to 6 percent of all children with congenital heart defects.
Congenital heart block, when detected at or before birth in a structurally normal heart, is strongly associated with autoantibodies reactive with certain proteins.
In this congenital heart defect, the aorta (the main artery that carries blood to the body) originates from the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery (the artery that carries low-oxygen blood to the lungs) from the left ventricle.
www.congenitalheartdefects.com /typesofCHD.html   (7813 words)

  
 Cardiac, Adult Congenital Heart Disease
As innovations have dramatically improved the prognosis of children with congenital heart disease, surviving adults now present unique problems as a result of both their anatomy and complications from their pediatric repairs.
While the number of adult survivors of significant congenital heart problems was small, the development of successful pediatric cardiac surgery was beginning to vastly improve the prognosis for these patients.
We were beginning to see problems that had never been seen before," recounts Dr. Rosenbaum, Director of the Schneeweiss Adult Congenital Heart Disease Center at Columbia and one of the few specialists in the United States who devotes full time to this field.
www.columbiasurgery.org /pat/cardiac/congenital.html   (533 words)

  
 Duodenal Obstruction - Definition, Description, Demographics, Causes and symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prognosis, ...
In infants and children, congenital defects (anomalies) usually cause duodenal obstruction, and symptoms are present at birth or shortly after when the infant attempts to feed.
The duodenum may have a membrane reducing the channel size (lumen), or two blind pouches instead of one duodenal channel, or a gap or flap of tissue may be present.
Obstruction of the duodenum occurs in infants as a result of congenital causes.
www.healthofchildren.com /D/Duodenal-Obstruction.html   (1913 words)

  
 Penn State Plastic Surgery:  Hand & Wrist Surgery: Congenital Abnormalities
Congenital abnormalities of the hand and upper extremity are differences from normal that are present at birth.
Some genetic problems are new occurrences where the baby is the first to have the condition but the child may pass it on to his or her children.
Congenital problems often occur with not feasible explanation as to why.
www.hmc.psu.edu /plasticsurgery/services/adult/hand/congenital.htm   (693 words)

  
 Congenital Aortic Stenosis treatment options at Mayo Clinic
Congenital (present at birth) aortic stenosis (AS) is a narrowing of the aortic valve or the area just below or above the aortic valve, which causes resistance to the forward ejection of blood from the left ventricle.
Close cooperation and interaction exists between the highly specialized adult congenital heart disease cardiologists and the cardiovascular surgeons who have special expertise in congenital heart disease, the pediatric cardiologists, the high-risk obstetricians and any other special health professionals that might benefit the patient.
Close follow-up by both the congenital cardiologist and the obstetrician throughout the course of pregnancy, labor, delivery and after delivery is strongly recommended for patients who have congenital heart problems.
www.mayoclinic.org /congenitalaorticstenosis-rst   (884 words)

  
 Treatment Options for Congenital Heart Disease at Mayo Clinic
Congenital heart defects can be so severe that life cannot be maintained, or they can be so mild that trouble is not even suspected.
Some congenital problems are very hard to diagnose without difficult, risky and expensive tests, which are done only if there is a high suspicion of an abnormality.
With some congenital defects, such as ventricular septal defect, if an operation to close the defect is postponed too long, the damage can be so severe that an operation to correct the problems is no longer helpful because of the high lung (pulmonary) artery pressure.
www.mayoclinic.org /congenital-heart/treatment.html   (540 words)

  
 Birthcare - Neonatal Problems: Congenital Toxoplasmosis
Women with a history of ingestion of raw meat in pregnancy, who travel to a region with high rates of infection (e.g., France) or who acquire a kitten and handle kitty litter should be tested.
The diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis in the newborn infant should be considered in the presence of positive maternal serology and/or suggestive clinical findings often associated with abnormalities of ophthalmological examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and cranial CT scan.
The treatment of choice for congenital toxoplasmosis in the neonate is the combination of pyrimethamine, sulphadiazine and folinic acid administered for one year.
www.mybirthcare.com /toxoplasmosis.asp   (425 words)

  
 [No title]
At the onset of congenital syphilis, Treponema pallidum, the bacterium responsible for syphilis, is liberated directly into the circulation of the foetus resulting in widespread dissemination.
Late manifestations of congenital syphilis are the result of scarring from the early systemic disease and include involvement of the teeth, bones, eyes, and gummas in the viscera, skin, or mucous membranes.
However, the diagnosis of congenital syphilis in neonates is complicated by the transfer of maternal IgG antibodies to the foetus across the placenta.
www.hon.ch /Dossier/MotherChild/neonatal_problems/congenital_syphilis.html   (637 words)

  
 Canine Health Problems by Breed
Prospective pet owners of a breed with possible health problems may want to obtain a written health guarantee and only buy pets with both parents OFA certified (for breeds susceptible to Hip Dysplasia) and CERF certified (for breeds susceptible to hereditary eye conditions).
Even if a breed is not prone to health problems, it does not mean that a particular dog may not have that problem.
However, females have tendency toward ovarian cysts and infertility and they can be susceptible to back problems caused by their long back and excessive high-jumping.
www.uexplore.com /health/healthproblems.htm   (950 words)

  
 eMedicine - Nasolacrimal Duct, Congenital Anomalies : Article Excerpt by: Mounir Bashour, MD, CM, PhD, FRCSC, FACS
Although diverticulum of the lacrimal sac may occur, a congenital fistula of the lacrimal sac, which has been termed lacrimal anlage duct by Jones, is more common.
Congenital atresia, supernumerary or double puncta, and congenital slits of the puncta all may occur.
Tearing and mattering: Newborns who have congenital dacryostenosis may not develop acute dacryocystitis with a mucocele or pyocele of the sac in the early neonatal period but may simply have tearing with a chronic mucopurulent discharge, which usually manifests at 2 weeks.
www.emedicine.com /oph/byname/nasolacrimal-duct-congenital-anomalies.htm   (589 words)

  
 Congenital Heart Disease
There are several congenital heart defects that are detected and treated early in infancy.
Manyost of them are abnormal connections among the veins, and arteries of the heart, and arteries (such as the aortic and pulmonary arteries).
Children and adults with congenital heart disease should be treated by a cardiologist who specializes in congenital heart disease.
www.webmd.com /content/pages/9/1675_57849.htm   (811 words)

  
 Congenital Problems & Genetic Defects in Ferrets
Some common congenital defects are present at birth and cause death of the newborns.
Some congenital defects interfere with normal birth, such as necks bent almost double that cannot be straightened.
Kits with white heads (pandas) may be congenitally deaf, which is hard to assess in ferrets and causes no problem if they are confined to a safe, indoor environment.
www.peteducation.com /article.cfm?cls=11&cat=1281&articleid=542   (659 words)

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