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Topic: Congregationalist Church


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In the News (Sat 25 May 19)

  
  Congregationalist church governance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Consequently, with the onset of the Enlightenment, Congregationalist churches easily adopted and contributed to the Enlightenment ideal of the Individual, against which there has simultaneously been a continuous revolt as it is perceived to have eroded legitimate Congregationalist principles of authority and connectionalism.
The United Church of Christ is the result of a series of Unions constructed according to liberal congregationalist theory, as a union between the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches.
In the United Kingdom, the United Reformed Church is the merger of the Presbyterian churches and the Congregational churches, on congregational principles of union.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Congregationalist_church_governance   (1169 words)

  
 Congregationalist church   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
As such, the Congregationalists were a reciprocal influence on the Baptists, differing from them in that they counted the children of believers in some sense members of the church unlike the Baptists, because of baptism.
Congregationalists are the Pilgrims of Plymouth Rock, and the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which were organized in union by the Cambridge Platform in 1648.
Thus the Congregationalist churches were at the same time the first example of the American theocratic ideal and also the seed-bed from which American liberal religion and society arose.
www.encyclopedia-1.com /c/co/congregationalist_church.html   (505 words)

  
 Congregational church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Some Congregational churches trace their descent from the original Congregational Church, a family of Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by in 1592 and arising from the Nonconformist religious movement in England during the Puritan reformation.
Congregationalists include the Pilgrims of Plymouth and the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which were organized in union by the Cambridge Platform in 1648.
In 1957, The Congregationalists in the U.S. merged with the to form the United Church of Christ.
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Congregationalist_Church   (828 words)

  
 Congregationalist church governance -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Congregationalist chuch governance, often known as congregationalism, is a system of church governance in which every local (A group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given church) congregation is independent.
Autocephaly is strictly (A member of the Episcopal church) episcopalian, and assures the self-government of distinct (The jurisdiction of a patriarch) patriarchates within a structure of common doctrine, comparable practices, with some degree of mutual accountability through which they remain in communion with one another.
The (Merger of the Congregational Christian Church and the Evangelical and Reformed Church in 1957) United Church of Christ is the result of a series of Unions constructed according to liberal congregationalist theory, as a union between the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/C/Co/Congregationalist_church_governance.htm   (1157 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Congregationalist-Church
Some Congregational churches trace their descent from the original Congregational Church, a family of Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by Robert Brown in 1592 and arising from the Nonconformist religious movement in England during the Puritan reformation.
In 1972, the English Congregationalists merged with the Presbyterian Church of England to form the United Reformed Church, (URC); and subsequently, in 1981, the URC merged with the Re-formed Churches of Christ and, in 2000, with the Congregational Union of Scotland.
In 1957, The Congregationalists in the U.S. merged with the Evangelical and Reformed Church to form the United Church of Christ.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Congregationalist_Church   (630 words)

  
 HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH*   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Christ established a visible church with apostles, as authorized teachers and rulers, and with two sacred rites, baptism and the holy communion, to be observed to the end of the world.
For the church it is a process of self-purification, and the assertion of the holiness and moral dignity which essentially belong to her.
Deputies or clerks of the churches, corresponding to the shelichai of the synagogues.
www.ccel.org /s/schaff/history/1_ch10.htm   (8595 words)

  
 A Short Course in UCC History: Congregationalism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Westminster Confession of 1646, the design for Presbyterian church government and an expression of Reformed faith and doctrine, was revised for church polity and discipline at the Cambridge Synod of 1648.
Churches were to preserve communion with one another in mutual covenant with Christ.
In 1750, Edwards was dismissed from the Northampton church.
www.ucc.org /aboutus/shortcourse/congo.htm   (2634 words)

  
 DFC History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Church meetings were held in the various member's homes, in the schoolhouse or in a barn built in 1812.
The Methodist and Congregationalist communities were organized into a new unit in 1929 by a Cornell professor that included the Brooktondale, Slaterville, Caroline, Morris Chapel, West Danby and Danby areas.
This stately 180 year old New England style church was selected in 1981 to be photographed for the Department of Interior, Washington,D.C. The photographs are stored in the National Archives to be opened and viewed in 2081 for the next generation.
people2.clarityconnect.com /webpages4/danbyfed/DFC_history.html   (411 words)

  
 [No title]
Though the Congregationalists represented the smallest number of the founding churches of the United Church of Canada, the present freedom, independence, and autonomy of congregations within the United Church to choose their own administrative structure, Christian education materials, worship style, and to call their own clergy, is a direct result of the Congregationalist influence.
The open bible was used on The United Church crest to symbolize the Congregationalist church in recognition of the Congregationalist emphasis on the importance of individuals to choose their own beliefs based on biblical teachings rather than the adherence to specific doctrines.
The early Methodist church was less concerned with the development of new doctrinal statements, or the building of new churches, than it was with encouraging people to develop their personal faith, and have a constructive influence on the lives of others.
www.storm.ca /~bcuc/Sermons/srmmay28.htm   (1536 words)

  
 Non-belief in the United States: An Influential Minority Tradition
The new, state sponsored universities, because of the separation of church and state, were free from obligations to adhere to religious ideas (Lippy and Williams, 735).
In addition, his education in the sciences was continuing, and the creation story that the church continued to endorse made no more sense to him than any of the other seemingly random rules and beliefs of the church.
She had to adjust to her own switch from Congregationalist to Wesleyan while trying to understand and accept that her new faith was superior to the others in the area, and others in her own family.
are.as.wvu.edu /murphy.htm   (2678 words)

  
 Articles - Reformed churches   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Reformed Church of France survived under persecution from 1559 until the Edict of Nantes (1598), the effect of which was to establish regions in which Protestants could live unmolested.
Toleration for the Reformed churches in Germany was established under the Peace of Westphalia, in 1648, but political difficulties at the end of the 17th century almost eliminated them.
United Reformed Church (URC) in the United Kingdom is the result of the union of Presbyterian and Congregational churches.
www.gaple.com /articles/Reformed_churches   (1598 words)

  
 Articles - Congregational church   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Many Congregational churches trace their descent from the original Congregational Church, a family of Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by Robert Browne (theologian) in 1592 and arising from the Nonconformist religious movement in England during the Puritan reformation.
Wales traditionally is the part of Europe which has the largest share of Congregationalists among the population, most Congregationalists being members of the Undeb yr Annibynwyr Cymraeg (Union of Welsh Independents), which is particularly important in Carmarthenshire and Brecknockshire.
In 1957, the main body of Congregationalists in the U.S. (viz., the Congregational Christian Churches) merged with the Evangelical and Reformed Church to form the United Church of Christ.
lastring.com /articles/Congregational_Church?...   (863 words)

  
 United Church of Christ in Indiana
The United Church of Christ, however, was formed by the merger of four denominations with a long and vital history in early Indiana - the Christian Church and the Congregational Church as well as two predominantly German faiths, the Evangelical Church and the Reformed Church.
The English-speaking segment of the church was concentrated in the southern half of the state.
When the merger of the Congregational Christian Church and the Evangelical and Reformed was accomplished in 1957, it was the strength of the German church that gave it such a strong presence in Indiana.
www.connerprairie.org /historyonline/ucc.html   (2566 words)

  
 Just a Bump in the Beltway: Idolatry v. Religion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Congregationalist Church is a Christian denomination that preaches a personal relationship with God without a strong hierarchal structure guiding it.
It is a type of church administration practiced by a number of Christian denominations, Unitarian Universalism, all of the Jewish denominations, and most Islamic, Buddhist and Hindu mosques and temples.
Identifying Dean as a "congregationalist" with a large C indicates that it is a definable denomination.
www.node707.com /archives/000252.html   (7718 words)

  
 The Baptist Story 2
The denial of infant baptism was a blow at the very foundations of the Puritan theory of Church and State, and Dunston immediately became a dangerous enemy of the Commonwealth.
In New Jersey, the Congregational Church was the official church of that colony, and anyone who was not a member of said church could not be elected of public office, or serve in any military capacity of leadership, nor even be allowed to vote in public elections.
Mayer notes n p272 "At the beginning of the 1800's the majority of Baptists in the South held that all church practices not specifically commanded in the New Testament are contrary to the Scriptures.
www.gospelcenterchurch.org /baptiststorytwo.html   (6048 words)

  
 Dad 3 New England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The first church was smaller than this, and it blew down in the Great Gale in the early 1800's, and then it was rebuilt like this.
Perhaps a little before that, the church was part of a Unitarian Movement within the Congregationalist Church, and became Unitarian along with about 125 others, including 80% of the oldest 25 New England churches.
The Congregational Church eventually couldn't tolerate these Harvard-grad ministers and their radical beliefs, and in the early 1800's the Unitarian movement within the Congregationalist denomination allowed the churches to choose.
home.comcast.net /~bob.davis3/Dadne3.htm   (387 words)

  
 HOW THOMAS JEFFERSON'S "WALL OF SEPARATION" REDEFINED CHURCH-STATE LAW AND POLICY by Daniel L. Dreisbach   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In 1800, Jefferson’s Federalist Party opponents, led by John Adams, dominated New England politics, and the Congregationalist Church was still legally established in Connecticut.
In the Danbury letter, Jefferson deftly transformed the political principle into the constitutional principle of separation between Church and State by equating the language of separation with the text of the First Amendment.
First, Jefferson’s trope emphasizes separation between Church and State—unlike the First Amendment, which speaks in terms of the nonestablishment and free exercise of religion.
www.chroniclesmagazine.org /Chronicles/May2003/0503Dreisbach.html   (1639 words)

  
 DGW
In October of 1721 a meetinghouse for The First Congregationalist Church of Providence (later to be The First Unitarian Church) was only a gleam in the eyes of the Massachusetts Congregationalist clergy.
There is nothing about Edes's twenty-seven years of service to the church except for three documents tucked in among Hall's papers, none of which gives any general information about his life, person, or ministry.
The church histories say that the ministries of Hitchock and Hall ended with their deaths.
members.aol.com /nanvan2/dgw.htm   (1311 words)

  
 Welsh Congregationalist Church, Sharon
The church edifice on Pennsylvania Avenue was erected in 1856.
A church was erected, in Penn avenue, about 1856.
The members of the Welsh churches are employese of the iron-works.
www.rootsweb.com /~pamercer/PA/PL/Church/Sharon/welshcong.htm   (217 words)

  
 LIBERTARIAN HERITAGE PURITAN CONGREGATIONALIST CHURCH
The Early Church believed (as the Scriptures teach) in the Second Coming of Christ, when He will establish His Kingdom on Earth, with His throne in Jerusalem, from where He will rule in peace (with His saints) for a thousand years.
Amillennialism is often used to justify a variety of prejudices and abuses of law; and many of today's churches that profess to be Premillennial are subtly mixing in a great deal of Amillennialism.
It is only later, after the church leaders have built and stored up much, sometimes after many years they attempt (with subtlety) to lead the people astray.
www.geocities.com /c2777/lhc/lhc1.html   (869 words)

  
 The Congregational Federation in Wales - Congregationalist Beliefs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Taking their lead from the Acts of the Apostles, Congregationalists believe that everyone who accepts Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour is able to speak with Jesus through prayer.
Each Church member has as much right to express his or her understanding of the Divine will as does his neighbour.
The Church Meeting at which each member has the right to speak and vote is Sovereign in the affairs of the Church.
www.haverfordwest.freeserve.co.uk /cfwales/beliefs.html   (222 words)

  
 Congregationalist Church, Greenville
After due deliberation, on account of their former clerk having left this section of country, and not being able to find any records of the church, the members were reorganized.” So reads the old minute book of a congregation that was once vigorous with active Christian endeavor.
No report is recorded, but notice is made of regular church meetings having been held in the public school-house, in the Presbyterian and in the Methodist Episcopal Churches.
The last record of the Greenville Congregational Church states that a “meeting was held May 21, 1863, at the house of
www.rootsweb.com /~pamercer/PA/PL/Church/Greenville/congreg.htm   (455 words)

  
 Brief Biographies of Jackson Era Characters (W)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Born in Hampton Connecticut to Ludovicus Weld, graduate of Harvard, and pastor of the town's Congregational Church.
His brother, Samuel, was on the opposite side of the Congregationalist church split.
Became pastor of the Tabernacle Church of Salem, MA.
www.jmisc.net /BIOG-W.htm   (5410 words)

  
 Welsh Congregationalist Church
The church services are held at present in the school-house, as no regular church building has yet been built, but it is the intention to commence the erection of a suitable chapel in the near future, The congregation has a membership of thirty three.
The Welsh residents of Wheatland organized a Congregational church in August, 1872.
The congregation worshiped in the village schoolhouse and elsewhere until the erection of their church.
www.rootsweb.com /~pamercer/PA/PL/Church/Wheatland/Welsh.htm   (241 words)

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