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Topic: Congregationalist church governance


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
  Presbyterian church governance - Wikinfo
Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of an assembly of presbyters, or elders.
The ordained ministry possesses responsibility for preaching and sacraments, government and practical care for the church, in a sense that the congregation does not have, although it is granted this responsibility for the sake of the local congregation.
Congregationalist churches are sometimes presbyterian also, with the difference that every local congregation is independent, and that aspect of the elder's office is emphasized in which he is regarded as a representative of the people in the affairs of the church.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Presbyterian_church_governance   (3208 words)

  
  Congregationalist church governance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In Christianity, it is distinguished from presbyterian church governance, which is governance by elders, and from episcopalian church governance, which is governance by a hierarchy of bishops.
The United Church of Christ is the result of a series of Unions constructed according to congregationalist theory, as a union between the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches.
In the United Kingdom, the United Reformed Church is the merger of the Presbyterian churches and the Congregational churches, on congregational principles of union.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Congregationalism   (1168 words)

  
 Congregational church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Many Congregational churches trace their descent from the original Congregational Church, a family of Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by Robert Browne (theologian) in 1592 and arising from the Nonconformist religious movement in England during the Puritan reformation.
Congregationalists include the Pilgrims of Plymouth and the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which were organized in union by the Cambridge Platform in 1648.
Thus, the Congregationalist churches were at the same time the first example of the American theocratic ideal and also the seed-bed from which American liberal religion and society arose.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Congregationalist_Church   (842 words)

  
 Qwika - Baptist
Congregationalist church governance gives autonomy to individual local churches in areas of policy, polity and doctrine.
The original objection was opposition of the monarchy or government setting religious agenda for churches or a "National Church" and did not imply a retreat by Christians from the political realm or involvement in the political process.
The office of elder, common in some evangelical churches, is usually considered by Baptists to be the same as that of pastor, and not a separate office.
wikipedia.qwika.com /wiki/Baptist   (4173 words)

  
 Episcopalian church governance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Episcopalian government in the church is rule by a hierarchy of bishops (Greek: episcopoi).
The Catholic churches of Rome and Byzantium (Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox in modern terms) are episcopalian, as are the Oriental Orthodox churches.
In these latter cases, the form of government is not radically different from the presbyterian form, except that their councils of bishops have hierarchical jurisdiction over the local ruling bodies to a greater extent than in most Presbyterian and other Reformed churches.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Episcopacy   (1253 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Congregationalist church governance
Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders.
The United Church of Christ is the result of a series of Unions constructed according to liberal congregationalist theory, as a union between the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches.
The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States, generally considered within the Reformed tradition, and formed in 1957 by the merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Congregationalist-church-governance   (1866 words)

  
 Congregational church Summary
Many Congregational churches trace their descent from the original Congregational Church, a family of Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by the theologian Robert Browne in 1592 and arising from the Nonconformist religious movement in England during the Puritan reformation.
Congregationalists include the Pilgrims of Plymouth and the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which were organized in union by The Cambridge Platform in 1648.
In 1925, the United Church of Canada was founded by the merger of the Canadian Congregationalist and Methodist churches, and two-thirds of the congregations of the Presbyterian Church of Canada (or in French, Église Presbyterienne du Canada).
www.bookrags.com /Congregational_church   (1792 words)

  
 Congregationalist church governance -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Congregationalist chuch governance, often known as congregationalism, is a system of church governance in which every local (A group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given church) congregation is independent.
Autocephaly is strictly (A member of the Episcopal church) episcopalian, and assures the self-government of distinct (The jurisdiction of a patriarch) patriarchates within a structure of common doctrine, comparable practices, with some degree of mutual accountability through which they remain in communion with one another.
The (Merger of the Congregational Christian Church and the Evangelical and Reformed Church in 1957) United Church of Christ is the result of a series of Unions constructed according to liberal congregationalist theory, as a union between the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/C/Co/Congregationalist_church_governance.htm   (1157 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Congregational church
Many Congregational churches claim their descent from the original Congregational Church, a family of Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by the theologian Robert Browne in 1592 and arising from the Nonconformist religious movement in England during the Puritan reformation.
Congregationalists include the Pilgrims of Plymouth, whose ecclesiastical tradition is in the Unitarian church, and the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which were organized in union by The Cambridge Platform in 1648 and are now the contemporary Congregational church.
The first Unitarian church in America was established in Boston, Massachusetts in 1785 and by 1800, all but one Congregationalist church in Boston had Unitarian preachers teaching the strict unity of God, the subordinate nature of Christ, and salvation by character.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Congregational_church   (1966 words)

  
 Baptist - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Congregationalist church governance gives autonomy to individual local churches in areas of policy, polity and doctrine.
Baptist churches are not under the direct administrative control of any other body, such as a national council, or a leader such as a bishop or pope.
Landmarkism is the belief that Baptist churches and traditions have preceded the Catholic Church and have been around since the time of John the Baptist and Christ.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Baptist   (2751 words)

  
 Congregational churches - Theopedia
Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs.
The history of Congregational churches in the United States is closely intertwined with that of the Presbyterian church, especially in New England where Congregationalist influence spilled over into the Presbyterian church.
Some local churches did not follow the 1957 UCC merger and continue today as the National Association of Congregational Christian Churches or as members of the Conservative Congregational Christian Conference.
www.theopedia.com /Congregational   (825 words)

  
 Presbyterian church governance -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of (An elder in the Presbyterian Church) presbyters, or elders.
Thus, the presbyters (elders) govern together as a group, and at all times the office is for the service of the congregation, to pray for them and to encourage them in the faith.
Presbyterianism is also distinct from (System of beliefs and church government of a Protestant denomination in which each member church is self-governing) Congregationalism, in that individual congregations are not independent, but are answerable to the wider church, through its superior courts (presbyteries and assemblies).
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/P/Pr/Presbyterian_church_governance.htm   (1051 words)

  
 Ecclesiology information - Search.com
Ecclesiology is a branch of Christian theology that deals with the doctrines pertaining to the Church itself as a community or organic entity, and with the understanding of what the "church" is: its role in salvation, its origin, its relationship to the historical Christ, its discipline, its destiny (see Eschatology) and its leadership.
It is, therefore, the study of the Church as a thing in itself, and of the Church's self-understanding of its mission and role.
In addition to describing a broad discipline of theology, ecclesiology may be used in the specific sense of a particular church or denomination’s character, self-described or otherwise.
domainhelp.search.com /reference/Ecclesiology   (769 words)

  
 Baptist - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Most Baptist churches do not have an age restriction on membership, but will not accept as a member a child that is considered too young to fully understand and make a profession of faith of their own volition and comprehension.
Exceptions to this local form of democratic congregational governance include a few churches that submit to the leadership of a body of elders, as well as some Reformed Baptists who are organized in a Presbyterian system and the Congolese Episcopal Baptists that have an Episcopal system.
Though this does not follow the practice of congregationalist church governance, it is consistent with the principles of individual church autonomy.
www.proxygasp.com /index.php?q=aHR0cDovL2VuLndpa2lwZWRpYS5vcmcvd2lraS9CYXB0aXN0   (6374 words)

  
 Reformed Church Encyclopedia Article, Definition, History, Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
A sub-family of the Reformed churches, called Reformed Baptist churches, adheres to modified Reformed confessions, and have Baptist views of the sacraments and of church government.
The Reformed Church of France survived under persecution from 1559 until the Edict of Nantes (1598), the effect of which was to establish regions in which Protestants could live unmolested.
United Reformed Church (URC) in the United Kingdom is the result of the union of Presbyterian and Congregational churches.
www.karr.net /search/encyclopedia/Reformed_Church   (1798 words)

  
 Baptist - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
However, Baptist churches will often associate in organizations such as the Southern Baptist Convention in the United States, which is the largest Baptist association in the world, and the second-largest Christian denomination in the USA, after the Roman Catholic church.
Some Baptist megachurches lean towards a strong clergy-led style, whereby the membership has little or no oversight into the affairs of the church leadership; though this does not strictly follow the practice of congregationalist church governance it is consistent with the principles of church autonomy.
The office of elder, common in some evangelical churches, is usually considered by Baptists to be the same as that of pastor, and not a separate office; however, some churches, especially those in other countries such as Australia, acknowledge the position of elder, and others even dispose of the position of deacon altogether.
soldir.solutionsadvancing.com /wiki/index.php/Baptist   (5550 words)

  
 Unitarian Universalism Information
Unitarian churches were formally established in Transylvania and Poland (by the Socinians) in the 16th Century.
These churches, which may still be seen today in nearly every New England town square, trace their roots to the division of the Puritan colonies into parishes for the administration of their religious needs.
The Univeralist National Memorial Church is a church built by the former Universalist Church of America to commemorate Universalist soldiers and sailors who served in World War I, and to serve as the "Cathedral" of Universalism in the nation's capital.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Unitarian_Universalism   (4086 words)

  
 Articles - Baptist   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
This backronym is used by some Baptist churches as a summary of the distinctives or distinguishing beliefs of Baptists.
The original objection was opposition of the monarchy or government setting religious agenda for churches or a "National Church" and did not imply a retreat by Christians from the political realm or involvement in the political process.
The office of elder, common in some evangelical churches, is usually considered by Baptists to be the same as that of pastor or deacon, and not a separate office.
www.poncier.com /articles/Baptist_Church   (3492 words)

  
 Baptist - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Support of Seperation of Church and State does not imply a retreat from the political realm; it should be noted that Baptists, like many other citizens in democracies, do not generally eschew involvement in the political process.
It can be shown however that churches holding many of the Baptist beliefs existed prior to the reformation (thus they are not Protestant) and that there is no known point of origin if their claim is not correct.
The term Anabaptist is one that was given to a broad category of churches that "rebaptized" former members of other churches that did not share their beliefs.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=3979   (2308 words)

  
 Baptist - Free net encyclopedia
Baptist churches are often regarded as an Evangelical Protestant denomination.
This belief is, however, inaccurate in most Baptists' churches, as they represent the independent "Local New Testament Church" movement of the original Jerusalem church congregation, related in some ways to Landmarkism.
Image:Calvary baptist church lex ky.jpg Congregationalist church governance gives autonomy to individual local churches in areas of policy, polity and doctrine.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Baptist   (4287 words)

  
 Christian Denominations: Baptists - ReligionFacts.com
Many Baptists trace their denomination's origins to the early church, a period when the church consisted of committed believers who were baptized upon confession of faith as adults.
Baptist churches tend to be evangelical in doctrine and Reformed in worship.
Baptism is seen as a public identification of the person with Christianity and that particular church and is often used as a criterion for membership in Baptist churches.
www.religionfacts.com /christianity/denominations/baptists.htm   (2112 words)

  
 Baptist - Christianity Knowledge Base   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Baptist churches are often regarded as an Evangelical Protestant denomination, though they were not necessarily started in protest to anything.
Authority of the Scriptures or sola scriptura states that the Bible is the only authoritative source of God's truth in contrast to the role of Apostolic tradition in the Roman Catholic Church, or personal revelation in charismatic circles.
The choice in music style is often correlated to the predominant age of the members, with older congregations preferring traditional hymns played with piano and/or organ and featuring a choir.
christianity.wikia.com /wiki/Baptist   (4162 words)

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